or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Chinese accessory maker claims to have 'permanently cracked' Apple's Lightning authentication
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Chinese accessory maker claims to have 'permanently cracked' Apple's Lightning authentication

post #1 of 90
Thread Starter 
A Chinese accessory maker claims to have "permanently" cracked the Lightning authentication feature built into Apple's iOS 7 operating system, opening up the possibility for a wide range of manufacturers to make Lightning-compatible iPad and iPod accessories without Apple's approval.



Chinese manufacturer iPhone5mod was already noted for offering non-Apple approved Lightning accessories last year even as the Cupertino company was still working out the details of manufacturer authorization. Now the accessory maker claims that it has developed a solution that keeps iOS 7 from warning users when they're using uncertified Lightning cables.

iPhone5mod's Lightning crack is said to be hardware-based. According to the company, Apple cannot negate the crack without reworking its own Lightning hardware.

So confident is the company in its circumvention of Apple's restrictions that it is offering money-back guarantees that its new cables will work with the final build of iOS 7.

The manufacturer now lists five cables on its homepage as "for iOS 7.0." These include a standard white Lightning cable,two iPhone 5 docks, and a Lightning extension cable.

iPhone5mod has drawn Apple's attention in the past. In August of last year, Apple sent the manufacturer a takedown notice warning it to stop offering a case modification that made an iPhone 4S look like an iPhone 5. The mod used both Apple's logo and the iPhone name, two factors that Apple said amounted to counterfeiting.

The Lightning connector standard made it possible for Apple to exert a much greater level of control over many of its accessory suppliers. With the built-in authentication chips ? first noted by AppleInsider last September ? the company is able to make sure that participants in its Made For iPhone/iPad program are making products of a certain quality.
post #2 of 90
And then 6.1.5 bypasses it.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply
post #3 of 90
In light of the concept for hacking devices via the lighting cable I wonder how successful their sales will be

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #4 of 90
Not to say these will not show up in the US, but Apple and Intel both can keep legit US companies from selling these products. Most of this crap usually shows up on Amazon and Ebay.

We know that Apple and Amazon are not friends these days so I wonder is Apple will attempt to force Amazon from letting the no name Chinese companies who sell the crap.
post #5 of 90
WTB an upcoming super power that doesn't encourage industries to antagonize American companies.
post #6 of 90
You would think that all the time spent on reverse engineering this cable the company could do something more productive.
Edited by Metrix - 6/24/13 at 12:04pm
post #7 of 90
Isn't this a legitimate patent issue?
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #8 of 90

Waiting for Chinese residents denying patent and copyright abuse in China.

post #9 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plagen View Post

Waiting for Chinese residents denying patent and copyright abuse in China.

Waiting for non-Chinese, generic anti-Apple people to claim how evil and horrible Lighting is in the first place.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply
post #10 of 90

Well, it's China after all.  Like they even remotely care about IP.

post #11 of 90

And Apple will soon announce that they have a software fix to permanently crack the permanently cracked cables.

Please update the AppleInsider app to function in landscape mode.

Reply

Please update the AppleInsider app to function in landscape mode.

Reply
post #12 of 90

hmm - maybe Apple approved cables have extra insulation - so that non Apple approved cables can have excess voltage pumped through them and cause a fire then no one will buy the cheap stuff again - or is it amps that do the trick?

post #13 of 90
Those Chinese, they crack me up.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #14 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post

hmm - maybe Apple approved cables have extra insulation - so that non Apple approved cables can have excess voltage pumped through them and cause a fire then no one will buy the cheap stuff again - or is it amps that do the trick?

Amps
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #15 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

Isn't this a legitimate patent issue?

Sure seems like one to me.....

Tallest Skil:


"Eventually Google will have their Afghanistan with Oracle and collapse"

"The future is Apple, Google, and a third company that hasn't yet been created."


 


 

Reply

Tallest Skil:


"Eventually Google will have their Afghanistan with Oracle and collapse"

"The future is Apple, Google, and a third company that hasn't yet been created."


 


 

Reply
post #16 of 90
Of course, in order to sell the products in America they will have to put a warning on the box... "Warning: You will not be warned about using this cable."
post #17 of 90

It's one of the consequences of US business shipping 50,000 factories (and jobs) overseas. The chinese are stealing our IP and not just cables, but defense, aerospace, etc., etc.

 

Ugh!

post #18 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNSF View Post

Of course, in order to sell the products in America they will have to put a warning on the box... "Warning: You will not be warned about using this cable."

Or 'pwease inert corwectry' lol.gif
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #19 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

It's one of the consequences of US business shipping 50,000 factories (and jobs) overseas. The chinese are stealing our IP and not just cables, but defense, aerospace, etc., etc.

 

Products can be reverse engineered without needing to be produced in the same country.  Once you put a successful product out there, chances are someone will figure out how to recreate it cheaper.

 

The real problem is that there are a lot of technically adept people in China, but not enough innovative companies to put their skills to good use (i.e. creating new products rather than reverse engineering and recreating existing products).  Then again, this phenomenon isn't exactly unique to China.

 
Reply
 
Reply
post #20 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

Isn't this a legitimate patent issue?

That is a very good question and frankly I'm not convinced that the answer is clear. Mainly because there are some protections in place for interoperability. Frankly i think Apple has gone off the deep end with Lightening anyways as it is more of a disincentive than a positive feature. We will see how this plays out long term. Frankly I'm a bit surprised that there is much in the Lightening port that is patentable as new technology.
post #21 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

And then 6.1.5 bypasses it.

Nope, wrong again. This is a hardware encoding and the point version of an iOS update would never block use of a lightning cable since that would also potentially block legitimate cables or people that had not updated. Besides the fact that the encoding and authentication in lightning has nothing whatsoever to do with an iOS point release. 

 

Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. 

Reply

 

Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. 

Reply
post #22 of 90

I recently saw a bowl of similar cables for sale at a UPS Store. The new franchisee owner promoted them as a good deal because the cables from Apple were expensive. For the owner, he priced these several times his cost. I told him that he was part of the problem and reminded him about the research and development cost that is factored into his phone. I also reminded him of the risk of damaging a customers phone. 

Cubist
Reply
Cubist
Reply
post #23 of 90
and yet another lawsuit is underway
post #24 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

Well, it's China after all.  Like they even remotely care about IP.

 

They only care when it's their own IP.
post #25 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

It's one of the consequences of US business shipping 50,000 factories (and jobs) overseas. The chinese are stealing our IP and not just cables, but defense, aerospace, etc., etc.

 

Ugh!



How would keeping those 50,000 factories (and jobs) in the U.S. have made any difference?  China could still get their hands on the cables, crack them, reverse-engineer them and be exactly where they are now.  Doesn't make one iota of difference.

What's a shame is that even with the media buzzing this, China's government doesn't stop for a moment to think "Gee, we really shouldn't be doing this."

All that R&D that Apple does just ends up saving the copycat artists from having to do their own development.  Leeches.

post #26 of 90
I see China's utter disregard for the IP of foreigners as being analogous to Germany's militarism in the 1930's. I see the same feckless response to those who are witnessing the blatant violation. Whether it's going to be limited to a US vs. China confrontation, or whether it's going to be WWIII, I don't know, but their egregious theft of our technology will require a response.
post #27 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

It's one of the consequences of US business shipping 50,000 factories (and jobs) overseas. The chinese are stealing our IP and not just cables, but defense, aerospace, etc., etc.

Ugh!
Yes, but no evil unions to deal with!
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #28 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Those Chinese, they crack me up.

 

Personally, I think anyone that believes that they have irreversibly circumvented Apple's technological IP must be permanently cracked.

post #29 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by city View Post

I recently saw a bowl of similar cables for sale at a UPS Store. I told [the new franchisee owner] that he was part of the problem . 

 

Hold it. First let's agree on what "the problem" is. To me, the problem is that Apple prices their Lightning accessories at $20-$30. That means when I got a new iPhone that I didn't exactly pay bottom dollar for, I also had to go pay $100 for new cables. If these Chinese companies can sell functionally-equivalent cables for half what Apple is selling them for and still make a profit, then Apple's profiteering is "the problem." Your local UPS franchisee is a symptom, not part of "the problem."

post #30 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

Nope, wrong again. This is a hardware encoding and the point version of an iOS update would never block use of a lightning cable since that would also potentially block legitimate cables or people that had not updated. Besides the fact that the encoding and authentication in lightning has nothing whatsoever to do with an iOS point release. 

Well, we only have the company's word that this is cannot be blocked. If they're wrong, good luck getting your money back.
post #31 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

Isn't this a legitimate patent issue?

If it is, and it sure seems like it should be, they will have to sneak them into the US. Apple hires some detectives, they find who is importing them, then the Feds go cut some locks, but in the rest of the world it'll be a different story.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #32 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

This is a hardware encoding...

Even if true, all future devices block them. Cake.
Quote:
...and the point version of an iOS update would never...

'Kay.
Quote:
Besides the fact that the encoding and authentication in lightning has nothing whatsoever to do with an iOS point release. 

Keep living the dream, man.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply
post #33 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktappe View Post

 

Hold it. First let's agree on what "the problem" is. To me, the problem is that Apple prices their Lightning accessories at $20-$30. That means when I got a new iPhone that I didn't exactly pay bottom dollar for, I also had to go pay $100 for new cables. If these Chinese companies can sell functionally-equivalent cables for half what Apple is selling them for and still make a profit, then Apple's profiteering is "the problem." Your local UPS franchisee is a symptom, not part of "the problem."

I would like to see lower prices on Apple necessity accessories as oppose to just accessaries too, but you can't just go into a store and steal something because you believe it is too expensive. I assume this to be consistent with what you would teach your children. 

Cubist
Reply
Cubist
Reply
post #34 of 90
What is it about Asia that makes that part of the world want to rip off technologies developed by American companies? Seriously, this crap needs to stop. Don't Asians learn personal responsibility growing up? Don't they understand the concept of stealing? Or do they just think they are entitled to everything the world creates without paying for those creations?
post #35 of 90

I think it's time to order a few drone strikes. We might as well use that technology for something useful.

post #36 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post


Yes, but no evil unions to deal with!


Yes. Look at how well the Chinese people are doing at Foxcon without a union.

post #37 of 90

Import ban in 5...4...3...2...

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #38 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZREOSpecialist View Post

What is it about Asia that makes that part of the world want to rip off technologies developed by American companies? Seriously, this crap needs to stop. Don't Asians learn personal responsibility growing up? Don't they understand the concept of stealing? Or do they just think they are entitled to everything the world creates without paying for those creations?

I don't think it is healthy to make such broad generalizations about people's ethnicity. If the US did not have such a highly developed judicial system, Americans would still be wearing six shooters, murdering, robbing, slaughtering native people and decimating the natural environment just like they did in the wild west. Not to mention the history of human trafficking and enslavement of Africans. One should take in to consideration that the US is a couple centuries ahead of many other cultures with regard to modern civilization and industrialization.


Edited by mstone - 6/24/13 at 8:02pm

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #39 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I don't think it is healthy to make such broad generalizations about people's ethnicity. If the US did not have such a highly developed judicial system, Americans would still be wearing six shooters, murdering, robbing, slaughtering native people and decimating the natural environment just like they did in the wild west.

Hey we stop slaughtering the natives years ago.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #40 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


Even if true, all future devices block them. Cake.
'Kay.
Keep living the dream, man.

Only someone without a clue how hardware authentication works would make such naive comments. M'Kay Mr. Mackey. How exactly would current iPhones and iPads be expected to authenticate cables if they changed the standard? Wow you are batting a cool .000 today. 

 

Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. 

Reply

 

Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. 

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
  • Chinese accessory maker claims to have 'permanently cracked' Apple's Lightning authentication
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Chinese accessory maker claims to have 'permanently cracked' Apple's Lightning authentication