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Apple's new Maps app in OS X Mavericks extends tools for reporting, fixing errors

post #1 of 62
Thread Starter 
Apple has brought its iOS Maps to OS X Mavericks, adding enhanced error reporting tools to leverage crowdsourcing in order to improve its mapping service, search results, location information and directions.

OS X Mavericks Maps
Source: Apple


The upcoming release of OS X Mavericks brings Apple's Maps to the Mac desktop in the form of a native app, giving it an enormous advantage over the web-only mapping services offered by Google, Nokia and others.

As a native Cocoa app, OS X Maverick Maps is blazing fast, supports familiar multitouch gestures like pinch to zoom, directly integrates with Contacts, syncs location Bookmarks with iCloud and can share locations and directions using standard Share Sheets via email, iMessage, nearby users with AirDrop or to Twitter and Facebook.

One of the primary notable features in OS X's new Maps app, as demonstrated by Apple's head of software engineering Craig Federighi at WWDC earlier this month, is the ability to plan a trip at home and then forward the route, via iCloud, directly to your iPhone for turn by turn directions in your car (below).

OS X Mavericks Maps
Source: Apple


Reporting maps errors made easier on the big screen



But another clear intent of putting Maps on the Mac involves leveraging lots of eyeballs to identify and report errors, something Apple has made easier to discover and do on the Mac when compared to smaller-screened mobile devices.

Apple has always included a way to "report a problem" in iOS 6 Maps, but because it does so in the context of Yelp local search information, it's not readily obvious that this button is for reporting map errors rather than just filing a grievance against a business or Yelp's data (below).

iOS6Maps.92512.9.jpg


Additionally, once a user decides to report an issue, whether related to the contact information of a particular point of interest, an incorrect pin location or a nonexistent search result, the small size of a mobile device's screen also complicates this task.

On MacBook or Cinema Display, it's much easier to report an issue. Users can even open another window to perform a parallel search for the correct data of a particular location.

Where's the fire (station)?



Apple has also improved its Maps issue reporting process, a necessary function for a tool that depicts the entire globe and all of the changes, construction and location updates occurring by the millions every day.

One example of a significant, recent map change involves Fire Station 1, which was recently moved out of the way for an expansion of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

The museum contributed $10 million dollars to design and build a new station a couple blocks away, which was just completed a few months ago.

Apple Maps still shows the old location on Howard Street, information that's also incorrect on Yelp, where Apple gets the data. The change is recent enough that it doesn't yet even show up on the city's fire station map.

Google Maps
Source: Google Maps


Google Maps for iPhone, the current web version of Google Maps, and the new vector-based WebGL version of Google Maps that's now in beta (above) all pinpoint the station at its new location, at least if you explicitly search for "Fire Station 1." If you just search for "fire station," Google Maps shows you several surrounding locations but omits the new one.

All three versions also portray the site with outdated Street Views (below) that show (mostly obscured by trees at the street level) the previous building: the site of an illegal sweatshop the Feds shut down a decade ago.

Google Street View
Source: Google Maps


In Google's iOS Maps app (below top), you can see Street Views or, in standard satellite mode, you can see the building's roof. In the new web-only WebGL Google Maps beta, you can also see Google's Flyover-like view, although unlike Apple Maps, you can only view Google's 3D satellite images from fixed angles and the images are much lower quality.

Google Maps
Source: Google Maps

Google Maps
Source: Google Maps


Apple Maps also shows the old building on the new site (below). While Apple doesn't have Google's Street View images, it does pull street level, interior and other site relevant photos from Yelp and other sources for selected locations.

OS X Mavericks Maps
Source: Apple


In Flyover, you can also zoom in and around a 3D modeled satellite view of the old (below) and new sites, but as with Google's static satellite and Street Views, it's often hard to know how old the satellite images are and equally impossible to correct them on your own. You can, however, submit a report flagging an error, as described on the next page.

OS X Mavericks Maps
Source: Apple




Reporting a problem



With the Mac's increased screen size and windowing display, its now easier to report a problem in Maps. Apple presents "Report a Problem" in Maps application menu bar as well as in the detail panel of a selected location (below).

OS X Mavericks Maps


Reporting an issue presents a sheet featuring a drop down menu including "place does not exist," allowing you to simply note that the location has closed or enter a descriptive comment (below).

OS X Mavericks Maps


You can also select "information is incorrect" and suggest the correct data, which appears in red (below).

OS X Mavericks Maps


You can report a pin placed at a incorrect location, and drag it to the correct spot.

OS X Mavericks Maps


These are all things you can already report in iOS 6 Maps, although they're easier to perform on the Mac.

Reporting another problem



The new OS X Mavericks Map app also offers expanded, detailed issue reporting related to satellite images, labels, search and directions. For example, you can report a "problem with satellite image," noting that it is outdated, poor quality or enter a more specific problem (below) as well as positioning the map to show the problem you describe.

OS X Mavericks Maps


You can report an incorrectly labeled street or other feature (below), suggesting your own alternative.

OS X Mavericks Maps


You can also report an incorrect search result, selecting a particular pin as an "unexpected result," or noting that the results of a search selected the wrong pin.

OS X Mavericks Maps


Additionally, you can report a problem with the directions provided, specifying that the directions led to the wrong place, took longer than estimated, involved traffic or a closed road, or comment on another problem. You can even specify a problem with a specific step along the route, noting that it went the wrong way, involved a prohibited turn, a closed road or some other issue.

OS X Mavericks Maps


Apple's ambitious plans for Maps



OS X Maverick's new native Maps app and expanded reporting options demonstrate Apple's interest in rapidly improving upon the mapping service it launched last summer, when it debuted iOS 6 Maps using its own new 2D and 3D map and satellite visualizations, points of interest and directions with traffic information.

Apple was clearly aiming to free itself from dependance upon Google, which was already threatening to leverage its own Maps+Navigation as an Android exclusive over iOS the same way Microsoft used the popularity of its Office suite to entice Mac users to adopt Windows in the mid 1990s, similarly using exclusive features and better performance on its own platform to woo defection.

Rather than trying to replicate the existing Google Maps, Apple jumped upon the opportunity to introduce its own modern mapping service leveraging vector-based maps to enable enhanced offline use, as well as technology acquired with C3 to deliver 3D Flyover views.

Apple also partnered with a variety of third parties including Waze, TomTom for maps, DigitalGlobe for satellite imagery, reviews and points of interest from Yelp, and data supplied by NASA, European Space Agency, the U.S. Geological Survey and other American, Canadian, British and Australian government agencies. Compiling all of this information together on a global scale for iOS 6 Maps' debut last summer proved to be a massive undertaking.

Apple Maps immediately branded a failure, by Google



Despite years of coordinated work on Maps to replace Google's service, Apple's mapping efforts were often negatively reviewed for depicting flawed Flyover images, presenting incorrect place labels and delivering inferior or at least different search results.

When ExtremeTech compiled its five "biggest tech failures" of 2012, it listed Apple Maps alongside HP's $8.8 billion Autonomy disaster, Google's Nexus Q flop, Microsoft's Metro-rebranding that dragged down both Windows Phone and Windows 8, and BlackBerry's entire year of corporate collapse.

Google on Apple Maps


Search Google for "Apple Maps" and the first suggestion is "fail," a treatment that isn't applied to even massive technology boondoggles such as Microsoft's Zune, Palm webOS, or Google's own Android 3.0 Honeycomb, Nexus Q or Buzz.

Last winter, Google's Motorola even launched a misleading social network campaign using hashtag "#iLost" to denigrate Apple Maps.

iLost.092712.jpg


Of course, a major reason behind the search engine's depiction of Apple Maps as a failure may likely be that the iOS 6 introduction of Apple Maps shifted Google Maps from getting nearly all iOS-related data related to millions of affluent users' maps, directions, traffic and location requests into the position of being an optionally downloaded, third party app that now claims, according to Onavo, only an estimated 34 percent of the iOS navigation app market.

Apple's move has also stripped Google of getting third party app developers' mapping referrals by default, making Onavo's ranking (based on users' active app use patterns) an optimistically conservative view of Google's Skyhooking at the hands of Apple Maps.

Given that 96 percent of the active installed base of iOS users have migrated to iOS 6, it's no wonder why Google is not happy about Apple launching its own maps at the expense of its own.

With Apple now putting its Maps on the desktop of 72 million Mac users, combined with easier to use issue reporting tools, Google will increasingly face competition with a more sophisticated product from Apple even as it stands to lose even more location-based web search traffic, particularly the data pertaining to a market segment covering 90 percent of PCs that sell for more than $1000.
post #2 of 62
Still don't understand why maps.appple.com doesn't exist.

Interestingly, the address doesn't 404 though. 1smile.gif
post #3 of 62

What if Google buy Yelp?

post #4 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Still don't understand why maps.appple.com doesn't exist.

Interestingly, the address doesn't 404 though. 1smile.gif

Maybe because you spelled apple with one "p" too many? 1biggrin.gif

post #5 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by matrix07 View Post

What if Google buy Yelp?

 

any sane anti-cartel commission should not allowed it. however, we live in insane world. what I miss are actually better maps. TomTom is not very good in some parts of Europe. still I like the product much more over Google's and I'm looking forward to success of desktop app. Apple will do better than Google here. As anywhere else. but what I would really like is Apple's Search...


Edited by poksi - 6/26/13 at 4:25am
post #6 of 62
I already pushed the "report a problem" button on my Iphone 4-5 times in the last 9 months to inform that the telephon number of my business here in Luxembourg is wrong.
Nothing changed :-(
post #7 of 62
Wanna know a way that'll pretty much guarantee to get Maps on the desktop of every Mac bought in the past 5 years? 1. Included it as a default app in Mavericks. Check! 2. Make Mavericks a free download. Check?

I think if Apple has any sense they'll release Mavericks for free. 1. They'll get everyone to install it. 2. It'll make the whole platform stronger. 3. It'll make Mac developers job far more streamlined, enticing, and easy. 4. It'll make buying a Mac more appealing: 'you mean to say I'll get cool new features and technologies and a new OS every year, for free!? Here's my credit card'. 5. It's good karma; it's good business.

Here's the year where Apple can make history. Let's do it!

In conclusion: of the people I know locally who have Macs, none of them have Mountain Lion installed. Yes: none of them. By making Mavericks free I can guarantee Apple that everyone I personally know will install it. Everyone I know with a Mac will be on Macericks. That's the bottom line. And that will apply to practically everyone everyone knows who has a Mac. That's the point! That's why 96% of iPhone users are on iOS 6: because it's free. And from that point on the same will apply to OS X. And that'll be a great thing!
Edited by Ireland - 6/26/13 at 4:41am
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post #8 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Wanna know a way that'll pretty much guarantee to get Maps on the desktop of every Mac bought in the past 5 years? 1. Included it as a default app in Mavericks. Check! 2. Make Mavericks a free download. Check?

I think if Apple has any sense they'll release Mavericks for free. 1. It'll give all its users great new features and technology for free. It'll get everyone to install it. It'll make the whole platform stronger. 4. It'll make Mac developers job far more streamlined, enticing, and easy. 5. It'll make buying a Mac more appealing: 'you mean to say I'll get cool new features and technologies and a new OS every year, for free!? Here's my check book. 6. It'll good karma; it's good business.

Here's the year where Apple can make history. Let's do it!

 

hell, why not free 15" retina for everybody! :)

 

joke beside:

 

1. Yes, by all means!

2. What, it's already cheap compared to Windows. Making it free could make it look bad.

post #9 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teamracer View Post

I already pushed the "report a problem" button on my Iphone 4-5 times in the last 9 months to inform that the telephon number of my business here in Luxembourg is wrong.
Nothing changed :-(




 

 

there are zillions reports like that. they are being forwarded to content providers. they are most probably overwhelmed with such reclamations. they also need to check every info for accuracy not to repeat a problem or make it worse. I am not looking for excuses, I'm just trying to point out how this is all simple to you and hoe time consuming and complicated it may be for other side...

post #10 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by poksi View Post

hell, why not free 15" retina for everybody! 1smile.gif

joke beside:

1. Yes, by all means!
2. What, it's already cheap compared to Windows. Making it free could make it look bad.

I disagree. By that logic iCloud or iOS would look bad because they are free. Apple can market this a feature and use it as one more way to make fun of Microsoft. "This other company gets its partners to make your computer and then tries to rip you off with new OS install fees." "At Apple we make great computers, we charge for them, and then we take care of you." It's a great selling point.
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post #11 of 62
Apple Maps seems just fine to me... except for 1 glaring exception integrated public transit information. I believe Apple would be smart to add an extension architecture to Maps, that way added functionality or services can be added to the users 1 Maps app.
post #12 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teamracer View Post

I already pushed the "report a problem" button on my Iphone 4-5 times in the last 9 months to inform that the telephon number of my business here in Luxembourg is wrong.
Nothing changed :-(

I know! Didn't everyone? That's the problem. It's sort of a joke at this point. Apple should have hired 100 additional people simply to handle Maps error reports. They should have 100 people doing that full time there. They clearly don't. It's a no brainier.
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post #13 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


I disagree. By that logic iCloud or iOS would look bad because they are free. Apple can market this a feature and use it as one more way to make fun of Microsoft. "This other company gets its partners to make your computer and then tries to rip you off with new OS install fees." "At Apple we make great computers, we charge for them, and then we take care of you." It's a great selling point.

 

for now people are more or less still being prepared pay for the products and they expect to do so. however, services market is destroyed by google and apple itself tried to charge for MobileMe. Didn't work, so now iCloud is for free. As a user, of course: I'd live OS X for free as well!

post #14 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


I know! Didn't everyone? That's the problem. It's sort of a joke at this point. Apple should have hired 100 additional people simply to handle Maps error reports. They should have 100 people doing that full time there. They clearly don't. It's a no brainier.

 

Doesn't Apple push this forward to content providers?

post #15 of 62
When a user reports a map issue, how long after does the fix show up in the maps? 6 months?
post #16 of 62

Does anyone know if you can edit routes (drag the route to a new waypoint) on the OSX Maps application similar to how you can edit routes in Google Maps? I would love to be able to do this.

post #17 of 62
This maps app will work great with the macbook/magic trackpad.
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post #18 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by spoonyfork View Post

Does anyone know if you can edit routes (drag the route to a new waypoint) on the OSX Maps application similar to how you can edit routes in Google Maps? I would love to be able to do this.

 

I'm pretty sure we already have this function since the 1st version on iOS.

post #19 of 62

You can report any problems in the Map app just fine on the iPhone. If anything is ever done with those reports, I don't know.

post #20 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by eat@me View Post

When a user reports a map issue, how long after does the fix show up in the maps? 6 months?

 

If any of the problems I have submitted ever get fixed, I'll let you know.

post #21 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by DipDog3 View Post

 

If any of the problems I have submitted ever get fixed, I'll let you know.

 

Hear hear.

 

I have submitted a problem like 10 times on a stupid ice cream stand that they forgot the 'North' part of the address is "123 somestreet North"  so its in somebody's house.  Its right on yelp and google.

 

This was when ios 6 first came out, and its yet to be fixed.


Edited by dugbug - 6/26/13 at 8:48am
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post #22 of 62
I'm glad Apple is making it easier to report map errors. That's been Google's strength. A few years back I asked Google Maps to give me a bike route from my place to the University of Washington. The route they gave would have been great except that they had me traveling CW around a lake where only CCW bike traffic is permitted. I reported that and, a couple of weeks later, got a thank you email from Google.

Bringing Maps to Macs brings up a question that's mystified me for several years. GPS chips designed for cell phones are cheap. Why doesn't Apple add them to their laptops? It'd put them one up on their competition and make those Location-aware features more useful. Or perhaps simpler, Apple might create a Bluetooth link that'd allow an iPhone to share its GPS data with iPads and Macs.

Personally I'm not that concerned that Apple's Maps app doesn't do transit services well. That's better handled by dedicated apps for each city. Those apps can use real-time data to tell when a bus will actually arrive not just when it's scheduled to arrive. It's a bit much to expect Apple to stay abreast of the quirks of every local bus system on the planet. Much better to leave that to third-party developers who know their cities and can work closely with transit officials.
post #23 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

I disagree. By that logic iCloud or iOS would look bad because they are free. Apple can market this a feature and use it as one more way to make fun of Microsoft. "This other company gets its partners to make your computer and then tries to rip you off with new OS install fees." "At Apple we make great computers, we charge for them, and then we take care of you." It's a great selling point.

iDevices are high margin items that many people upgrade every two years and many own two. Therefore iOS and iCloud can be supported with those revenues. Macs on the other hand last most people much longer than that and most people have only one (if any).

The new versions of OSX already have faster adoption rates than any desktop os in the history of computing. Further apple already has a reputation for good customer service.

I'm not saying that it wouldn't be nice to have free upgrades. I am saying that I just don't see very much incentive to do this from apples point of view, and as a Mac owner, I don't see myself as being in a position to complain.
post #24 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by matrix07 View Post

 

I'm pretty sure we already have this function since the 1st version on iOS.


First version of what on iOS? You can't edit a route by dragging in Apple's Maps iOS app or in Google's iOS Maps app. The question was whether one can edit a route by dragging in the OSX Maps app.

post #25 of 62
Apple Maps could not find a two-year old, large luxury hotel in Manhattan, close to Grand Central! (Westin Grand Central -- try it).

It is a nice, clean app but ridiculously hit-or-miss. I have essentially stopped using it because its content is useless.
post #26 of 62

What I would like Apple do with maps is take advantage of there faster method of scanning data (plane VS google street view)  The plus on that tech is then can show 3D rendering of everything in a scan region while street view, while more detail, is limited to what you can see... from the street.

 

So why not scan the entire world and make a 3D view of it? I was expecting to have a lot more 3D coverage in Apple maps. Granted Google has a huge head start with street view, but it should be faster to scan with planes.

 

imo, beside map accuracy and metadata inputs, 3D coverage is key here. Can Apple maps accept user pictures like google does?

post #27 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by poksi View Post

 

for now people are more or less still being prepared pay for the products and they expect to do so. however, services market is destroyed by google and apple itself tried to charge for MobileMe. Didn't work, so now iCloud is for free. As a user, of course: I'd live OS X for free as well!

 

I would pay for a big icloud drive. They should offer this imo.

I would also pay to have unlimited photo stream, not just 1000 pics.  I lost hundreds of pics when my imac drive fail, the pics where just out of the photo stream and I didnt had time to process, sort and backup my pics. So I lost them.

 

I now a time capsuled backup of the entire imac, but its too late.

post #28 of 62
Apple Maps branded a failure by Me too!

Perhaps in North America it is improving, but here in the UK its location database is so poor as to make it unusable (Yelp is also a vestigial service here). Occasionally I still fire it up, but locations known to Google are either absent, mistaken or shown as multiple results. A personal bug-bear is that Apple Maps fails to show railway stations until zoomed-in nearly all the way - which is no use at all when trying to locate public transport facilities in an alien environment.

I'll keep looking in on Apple Maps from time-to-time, but in the months since its inception it has improved not one jot in my hands, so I don't expect much improvement for an extended time.

In the meantime I hope Apple might accept its failings and allows users, via a preference setting, to default to Google (or other) Maps, so that tapping on an address in the Contacts app doesn't blindly point to Apple Maps.
post #29 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teamracer View Post

I already pushed the "report a problem" button on my Iphone 4-5 times in the last 9 months to inform that the telephon number of my business here in Luxembourg is wrong.
Nothing changed

1. They verify every report to make sure no one is pranking

2. If you are reporting a telephone number issue then you prosbby need to report that to Yelp directly (the button in question is likely for map errors only).
post #30 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Make Mavericks a free download. Check?
In conclusion: of the people I know locally who have Macs, none of them have Mountain Lion installed.

 

Not going to happen.

 

I don't know what that says about the people you know, but the actual adoption rate of Mountain Lion is currently about 35%, and as new Macs are sold that number of course keeps rising. For the 65% who aren't using ML there are likely many reasons. Some have older Macs that don't lend themselves to the current OS; many non-technical users probably don't even know what OS version they have, or that there are newer ones, or have no idea why one might want to upgrade. I'm sure we all know plenty of people like that.

 

But here's one thing I'd bet on: there's no more than a tiny percentage of Mac owners who decline to update because they're not willing to drop $20.

post #31 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by eat@me View Post

When a user reports a map issue, how long after does the fix show up in the maps? 6 months?

 

Took around 4 months for the first one I reported, and 5 months for the second (they were actually reported at about the same time).

 

These weren't small errors either, the railway station in Darlington (town of 100,000, annual passengers 2.5 million), wasn't shown at all, but a tiny station 4 miles away, called Croft Station (village of 470, annual passenges 0 since the station closed in 1969 and was demolished in the 1970s) was.

 

Reporting the problem on the phone was a piece of cake.  I'm not sure why DED needed to go out of his way to suggest it's too difficult or complicated.  I stopped reporting issues because the slow response from Apple made me decide that if they can't be bothered to accept my help in a timely manner, I'm not going to offer it anymore.

 

I actually decided to finally give up on Apple Maps on Monday.  I really like it as an application, I like how clear the maps are to read, how quickly it loads data, how well it zooms etc., but on Monday having just arrived at an unfamiliar airport on a business trip and asked it to direct me to the nearest CVS, it took me to a location that didn't exist.

 

I'm not a huge fan of Google generally, but their maps have never taken me to somewhere that just isn't there.

post #32 of 62
Don't think Mavericks needs to be free, just need to explain to users compelling reasons to upgrade. Honestly that was missing from Mountain Lion... along with the fact that it broke a few apps.

Apple maps needs to have transit directions as well as cycling, and if they want to push things a bit go for NEV directions as well. Neighborhood Electric Vehicles aren't allowed on streets with speed limits over 25mph and there are a number of spots that causes a need for very convoluted routings.

For cycling, you need to know routes where bikes are unadvisable as well as various bike route levels.

It would be cool to have a user-input facade photo mechanism, but I can imagine that would be hard to screen...
post #33 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyperson View Post

"A personal bug-bear is that Apple Maps fails to show railway stations until zoomed-in nearly all the way - which is no use at all when trying to locate public transport facilities in an alien environment."
I think that's even a more generalized problem. Lots of features, including street names that one needs in order to navigate properly, don't appear until the zoom level is high enough that the big picture is lost.
I'd like to see a simple slider control to set the threshold for when map details are displayed.
post #34 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by ennerseed View Post

Apple Maps seems just fine to me... except for 1 glaring exception integrated public transit information. I believe Apple would be smart to add an extension architecture to Maps, that way added functionality or services can be added to the users 1 Maps app.

Integrated transit info means that it will almost always be wrong. Which is why I agree with the notion of extensions/plug ins, even in iOS. It's an idea my blogging cousin first mentioned to me and I think it makes a lot of sense. Not just for maps but fonts, themes (iOS and in apps) etc
post #35 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by DipDog3 View Post

If any of the problems I have submitted ever get fixed, I'll let you know.

I can say the same thing about mapquest and google maps. Been reporting errors with them for years and most of them have never been fixed
post #36 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by spoonyfork View Post


First version of what on iOS? You can't edit a route by dragging in Apple's Maps iOS app or in Google's iOS Maps app. The question was whether one can edit a route by dragging in the OSX Maps app.

I remember I tested it when the Map app came out by dragging to change to another route. Not sure why you can't do that.

post #37 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by dugbug View Post

 

Here here.

 

Agreed. But it's hear hear.

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post #38 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by dugbug View Post

 

Here here.

 

I have submitted a problem like 10 times on a stupid ice cream stand that they forgot the 'North' part of the address is "123 somestreet North"  so its in somebody's house.  Its right on yelp and google.

 

This was when ios 6 first came out, and its yet to be fixed.

 

That's inexcusable.

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post #39 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by iaeen View Post


iDevices are high margin items that many people upgrade every two years and many own two. Therefore iOS and iCloud can be supported with those revenues. Macs on the other hand last most people much longer than that and most people have only one (if any).

 

I don't buy that argument. It's like those who argue that Apple will never produce an integrated TV because people don't renew them every two years. It doesn't make sense. They'd be lucky if they make $30 profit on the current Apple TV, and people don't buy a new one of those every two years either.

 

No. I think making Mavericks free just makes too much sense for Apple not to be seriously considering it. And this is the first time in living memory where they didn't announce a price. Besides, by giving it away for it free it makes the Mac far more appealing; it will sell more Macs, makes Mac users happier, makes Mac developers' lives a lot easier; by making their potential sales pool much larger, would make the platform FAR stronger. There are just too many good points.

 

"You mean now the Mac works just like the iPhone? You get free major updates every year? Wow!"

 

That's very appealing.

 

And it'd be very excising. And it allows Apple to push new software directions and associate services a lot more easily.


Edited by Ireland - 6/26/13 at 8:29am
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post #40 of 62
Please someone correct me if I'm wrong here, but I'm not sure if Apple is even allowed to make Mavericks free if the wanted to. Something about accounting laws in the US, or Sarbane-Oakley thingy-law?

I personally have half of my clients upgraded, whereas the other half actually can't upgrade on many of their production machines due to outdated software still in use. Also, some of that software, like FreeHand, will never be updated because it's EOLed by Adobe and Adobe has taken away the ability in CS6 or CC to open FH files in Illustrator. Those clients just can't afford to throw away 20+ years worth of files and easy access to them.

Those clients and machines that aren't in the above situation have all been updated to ML (skipped Lion).... and they all enjoy it. 1tongue.gif
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
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