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'Designed by Apple in California' ad ranks poorly in consumer survey

post #1 of 265
Thread Starter 
Apple's latest advertising campaign, touting the company's user-first corporate manifesto, has ranked poorly in a viewer analysis survey.



Of 26 Apple television ads in the last year, consulting firm Ace Metrix Inc. found that the subdued "Designed by Apple in California" spot earned the lowest score, Bloomberg reported on Thursday. Experts speculated that the new campaign could lack the excitement viewers feel when Apple unveils a new product.

The new ad, called "Our Signature," scored 489 on Ace Metrix's system, which is below the industry average of 542. It's also lower than past Apple campaigns that exceeded a score of 700.

Apple has gone for a softer approach in 2013, starting with a pair of ads dubbed "Every Day" that focus on popular features of the iPhone. The first ad, which debuted in April, showcased the iPhone's camera, while a second one launched in May touted its use as a music player.

The new "Designed by Apple in California" ad debuted earlier this month at the annual Worldwide Developers Conference, and began airing on television that same day. Rather than tout a single product, it gives something of a corporate philosophy for Apple, explaining its motives and focusing on the quality of its general product lineup.

The focal point of the new campaign is users interacting with Apple products, rather than talking about the devices themselves. In the first TV spot, a narrator says that Apple's mantra is to make a few great products that touch the lives of users.

"We spend a lot of time on a few great things, until every idea we touch enhances each life it touches," the narrator says. "You may rarely look at it, but you'll always feel it."

"This is our signature, and it means everything."
post #2 of 265
No surprise there.... It's boring
post #3 of 265
It ranked poorly because there was little reference to Apple in the ad, except for the last line.

People probably didnt know what the ad was for.
post #4 of 265

Do people really care where it was designed?  Not likely, they care more about what the product will do for them.  There's no value-add for where it was designed.

 

Mind you, Ikea might beg to differ.

post #5 of 265
Let's see, who do I place more trust in? World famous advertising firm Chiat-Day or a "consulting firm" nobody has ever heard of spouting negativity about Apple? Let me think about that for a second.

Really, AI? You decided to print this?
post #6 of 265
Why are we looking at that guy's underwear?
post #7 of 265

Ikea is crap. 

 

There is no flash to this ad, it's purpose is subliminal, therefore the Kardashian/Real Housewives/BOGO set will not be that into it--which is fine, because they'd only have an Apple product if it were given to them anyway...jussayin.

post #8 of 265
Total andcdote, but twice I've been in loud bars with TVs and the commercial came on and there was something about the quietness of it that made nearly everyone stop talking and watch it.

Obviously these spots aren't going to make someone run out and buy an Apple product, but I think it's a smart move to shore up their brand attributes during this new product lull.
post #9 of 265

post #10 of 265
Apple should evoke the thought of new, mind-blowing technology, not your grandma showing a slide-show
post #11 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

Apple should evoke the thought of new, mind-blowing technology, not your grandma showing a slide-show

 

Look again...she was watching the slideshow--or whatever was being shown on the big screen--not hosting it.

post #12 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

Apple should evoke the thought of new, mind-blowing technology, not your grandma showing a slide-show

Like Google Glass?

post #13 of 265
I agree with the stupid survey, Apple is displaying an awful lot of angst about its own importance with this icky new ad. It has the same effect on the stomach as too much sugar. The buoyant, Pixar-like video that opened WWDC this year was far more interesting.
post #14 of 265

I think the ad lacks the poetic touch "Think Different" had. "Think Different" was poetic and inspiring. This is rather bland, Cook obviously lacks Job's linguistic flair.

post #15 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakeb View Post

Total andcdote, but twice I've been in loud bars with TVs and the commercial came on and there was something about the quietness of it that made nearly everyone stop talking and watch it.

Obviously these spots aren't going to make someone run out and buy an Apple product, but I think it's a smart move to shore up their brand attributes during this new product lull.

The other factor is that this is the type of ad that requires repetition. A single viewing (as in this survey) really wont' accomplish much. But after repeated viewings, it will start to have an impact.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #16 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by dnd0ps View Post

I think the ad lacks the poetic touch "Think Different" had. "Think Different" was poetic and inspiring. This is rather bland, Cook obviously lacks Job's linguistic flair.

 

You're not suggesting Cook is the only one who had a say in it, are you? That would be silly.

post #17 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndrewofArabia View Post

I agree with the stupid survey, Apple is displaying an awful lot of angst about its own importance with this icky new ad. It has the same effect on the stomach as too much sugar. The buoyant, Pixar-like video that opened WWDC this year was far more interesting.

I think it's better in print. In TV it just felt similar to "Everyday" campaign. Should have run the animation one like you said.

post #18 of 265
Repeated viewing? More like... Nothing to see here.... Move along
post #19 of 265

While it is obvious that the ad has a decidedly subdued almost pensive feel to it, the message I get is that they're saying they don't crank out all kinds of crap like Samesung, just to see what sticks. I guess that's too subdued for many. The people in the ad clearly seem to be enjoying their Apple products or what they get from them, but perhaps the slow-mo footage was a bit too much.
 

post #20 of 265
This is why Apple is so effective... it's got it's mind on the ball, not whatever nonsense this firm is tracking.

That anecdote from the bar is more relevant.
post #21 of 265
I think it's because it's so PC that nobody takes it seriously. Utopian disingenuousness.
post #22 of 265
This article is entirely useless without:

- information on *why* they didn't like it.
- what the criteria for testing was
- a description of how "Ace Metrix's" system is set up

However, personally ... I agree.

When this ad isn't boring, it's smug, and talking about "we" without explaining until the very end who "we" is (consumer or company) is kind of a classic noob mistake. Surprised that such a prestigious firm made it.
post #23 of 265

Well, duh, of course it did.  There are 49 other states in the Union and most of them have a negative view of California. I'm glad they are so proud to be from California but it rankles me just as much as those people saying Texas should secede.  Apple is what Apple is because of their hiring practices which includes ALL of the US as well as the entire world. I mean, look at Johnny Ive for crying out loud.  Apple doesn't "belong" to California and their success has nothing to do with California.  In fact, given the taxes and such Apple would most likely be a much more lucrative company if they were based elsewhere.

post #24 of 265
Little wonder. It's a shitty, pompous advert that only serves to stroke Apple's ego.
post #25 of 265

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob55 View Post

 

You're not suggesting Cook is the only one who had a say in it, are you? That would be silly.

 

Nope, but Jobs would likely call this for what it is - a pile of sugary w@nk - and people would listen.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


The other factor is that this is the type of ad that requires repetition. A single viewing (as in this survey) really wont' accomplish much. But after repeated viewings, it will start to have an impact.

 Diabetes?


Edited by stike vomit - 6/27/13 at 6:49am
post #26 of 265

I find the "it means everything" tagline to be very weak.  If you've ever watched "American Idol", "America's Got Talent" or any other of these reality TV abominations, you see the ritual of the judge or the host ask a contender what winning would mean, and the idiot contestant invariably says it would mean "everything."  That sentiment has become meaningless.

 

And don't go with "amazing."  That word has lost its meaning as well and belongs on the jibber-jabber dungheap with "awesome."

post #27 of 265
Honestly, without the wordy narrator, the ad would have been pretty good. They didn't need to say a single word. The most powerful and profound things are the ones you can't explain and you can't say. Apple should know this by now - it's what defines their products. Not the bits you can explain, but the ones you can't, and you just know. My favorite recent ad that captures this is Photos Every Day.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NoVW62mwSQQ
post #28 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by matrix07 View Post

I think it's better in print. In TV it just felt similar to "Everyday" campaign. Should have run the animation one like you said.

I agree, the print version isn't quite as achingly sentimental, but I don't think it's really more effective, I think the photo and empty space that accompanies it is basically irrelevant. Phil Schiller is obviously a smart guy, but I don't think he has a common touch for marketing.
post #29 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by matrix07 View Post

Like Google Glass?

Shh...the nerds are asleep. You don't want to excite then or they'll never get back to sleep.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #30 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by dnd0ps View Post

I think the ad lacks the poetic touch "Think Different" had. "Think Different" was poetic and inspiring. This is rather bland, Cook obviously lacks Job's linguistic flair.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob55 View Post

 

You're not suggesting Cook is the only one who had a say in it, are you? That would be silly.

 

No, but he definitely needs to get off the "Steve is dead so Apple is doomed" bandwagon.

post #31 of 265

Designed by Apple in California - build by children in China.

However, aren't they all? Do we really have an option? Can't really hold that against Apple, but advertising where it was designed is almost deceiving. Just about every product sold by a US company was designed in the US. Few of them are actually BUILT in the US, which, to me, is a shame.

post #32 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

 

 

No, but he definitely needs to get off the "Steve is dead so Apple is doomed" bandwagon.

 

Apple isn't doomed, but Cook isn't the guy Apple needs right now, IMO. Apple needs vision and Cook seems to lack it. Admittedly, it's near impossible to follow a guy as charismatic as Steve Jobs. I wouldn't want to have to do that.

post #33 of 265
Their "signature" in these ads should have been an Apple logo.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #34 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by dnd0ps View Post

I think the ad lacks the poetic touch "Think Different" had. "Think Different" was poetic and inspiring. This is rather bland, Cook obviously lacks Job's linguistic flair.

It's a real contrast. The person who made this ad thinks that to appeal to everyone you have to include an example of everyone in an ad (young, old, white, black, ...). Steve knew better: to appeal to everyone you just need to use universally appealing *ideas* (such as the Think Different campaign).

post #35 of 265

Is there anything Apple does these days that doesn't either bring out the trolls or the Steve wouldn't have crowd?  1rolleyes.gif

post #36 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

Apple should evoke the thought of new, mind-blowing technology, not your grandma showing a slide-show

I disagree.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #37 of 265

Too subtle.

 

They could have saved 55 seconds by saying: "Apple is American and Samsung is a bunch of Korean crooks."  This line should be delivered by Clint Eastwood, Glenn Beck, Ted Nugent or a Charleton Heston impersonator.  It would be much more to the point.

post #38 of 265
Yes it's way too contrived and boring. That scene where the guy whips out his iPad Mini to take a photo at a Thai restaurant, I was expecting the guy next to him to punch him in the face. People hate the implied smug factor and the narcissistic gadget play, so why include it. Why not show a doctor or scientist using it in the field? Remember when Apple was for serious people? Also, Next keynote require Al Gore to bring an interesting guest.
post #39 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

However, personally ... I agree.

When this ad isn't boring, it's smug, and talking about "we" without explaining until the very end who "we" is (consumer or company) is kind of a classic noob mistake. Surprised that such a prestigious firm made it.

I actually love this. But I can see how it fails and why the ad is a mistake. I think it was intended as the new 'Crazy Ones'. A kind of mission statement. The trouble is it isn't needed, and so come off as a little smug. It is too low key, too subtle. It is very beautiful and I think the idea is very sophisticated and well executed, but I also think that what the ad is saying Apple shouldn't be saying. Let the public and the commentators say it. Or think it.

 

Apple is at pains to tell the world how much they suffer to bring us these amazing products. I think they should back off a little. They over-do it at every new launch. The Ive style introspection gets a little formulaic if repeated too often. The trouble with such introspective ponderings is that they lack excitement. We get Apple's depth and commitment, but lets be told how awesome and thrilling the products are.

 

I wonder if as Apple's products are used by all age groups Apple purposefully has been targeting an older audience. It seems that for quite while now parent and grand parents have been the focus.

 

I am not sure how many people remember the Jeff Golblum voiced ads. I despised those for their smug-ness. Its the Apple trait  I like the least. For me the most powerful ads were the dancing iPod ads, though as all ads, they were of their time, and targeted at quite specific market.

post #40 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Their "signature" in these ads should have been an Apple logo.

 

 

Agreed-  the  ( built by Apple in Cal..)   tag line creates an "awkward inward"  looking ending to a collage of images and ideas that are about the apple experience, 

which has been carefully crafted over the years.    

 

Better suited as an internal company piece that acknowledges employee efforts.   

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