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Apple holds 39% of US smartphone market, far ahead of Samsung's 23% - Page 2

post #41 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

 

But nothing you say is any different than any other large service provider from Amazon, Google to MS. It is true that each country requires its own deals but there is no question Apple is leading this charge and is, on the whole, WAY ahead of its nearest competitor (from 9 months back: http://www.macstories.net/stories/mapping-the-entertainment-ecosystems-of-apple-microsoft-google-amazon/). And yes, doing business in the EU costs substantially more than in the US. The EU gets a pretty darn good VAT tax (don't forget to add 5%-7% sales tax on US prices not shown) as well as a substantially higher warrantee cost. Even the Galaxy S4 (when released) costs more in Germany in Euros than the US in Dollars.

 

Thanks for the link, very interesting. I wasn't aware of the differences to Apple's competition to be honest, since I don't use any of their services. Clearly they seem to fare pretty well in comparison. However, as an EU customer I can safely say that I wish we'd have the same or a similar level of service US customers have.

 

Regarding S4 prices, you might be right, however also compare the difference in subsidies. Samsung and Android phones in general seem to be much more affordable on contract than iPhones.

 

However, I also believe Apple got a bit of a problem with brand perception in Europe. They don't seem able to clearly deliver the message about why they are better than their competition.

post #42 of 106
Apple will release a new iPhone with the internals of the 4 and lightning for $300-400 off contract.
post #43 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

You began, so don't begin whining now. 

 

As for the tax cost, it depends on the particular state where somebody lives, as tax rates are different from state to state.

 

It's almost 9% in my state, so that actually adds a bit of cost to the initial price of the phone.

 

Haha, I did indeed begin, however your statement was kind of ignorant, I stand by that.

 

Anyway, so let's add 9% to the US price, which is about $67 and the iPhone price goes up to $816. That's still a difference of more than $200 to European prices.

post #44 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


It is, so what's that to AI's international Apple devices owners who want the app ecosystem to do well where they are?
Strawman. Nobody HAS EVER ARGUED FOR SOMALIA. We talk about China, India, Europe, and South America where Apple can do better.
Americans need to get over their assumed position in the world. Western Europe has been as rich as America for decades now - present difficulties exist on both sides of the pond, and the BRICS have a growing middle class which needs to be captured. I am thoroughly sick of making this argument.

In any case this guy Apple[] also said "Other phone makers can tout their market share in crappy countries and places that don't matter. " and he clearly means anywhere not America.

 

I would argue winning the US in the software and services market is, by far, the first prize. Even then, however, Apple is doing very well in the EU regions:

 

http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_os-eu-monthly-201205-201306

 

Showing only minor downward trend during Android's explosive growth and holding pretty steady in usage in the past 7 months. I am much more interested in USAGE patterns than unit share since unit share without ownership is meaningless. I find it interesting Android is trending down in the EU while WP8 is showing very strong growth. In a growing market Apple is holding steady and this is very impressive given the competition dynamics and EU economics.

 

Apple is dead in South America and almost so in India (where Java based Series 40 phones still rule). In China, Apple needs China Mobile but is doing very well without them all things considered. They capture about 20% of the mobile web usage where a premium product is a hard sale. I would expect that to jump to about 40% if Apple can ever sign China Mobile. It takes decades to set up international distribution outlets and in this area, incumbents like Samsung, LG, Sony and HTC have a strong competitive advantage. I am amazed Apple has done so well.

 

And yes, "Apple II" is over the top but "crappy countries" is definitely referring to undeveloped nations.

post #45 of 106
Apple spent 2012 expanding the iTunes Store to more countries. Apple will continue to methodically increase distribution of the iPhone as it has here in the US. No point in expanding it too quickly as Apple would then be unable to meet demand.

2014 will be about network expansion to China mobile and more international networks to accommodate the demand for iDevices that the iTunes Store generates. Sure and steady wins this race.

Android with its crappy maleware ridden OS will start to feel pressure from Firefox OS on the low end and Apples relentless advance on the higher end. Samsung and Google will race to see who can stab who in the back faster (simply too much incentive to screw one another going forward).

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post #46 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post

Very true and very sad indeed. However, this will be no easy task for Apple and that's not entirely their fault. They just need to step up, especially when it comes to their ecosystem.

Europe consists of many (in comparison to the US) small countries, all with their own governments, regulation authorities, etc. Therefore it is extremely difficult to roll out services such as Movies, TV Shows, rentals related to such, etc in all of those countries, because separate negotiations need to take place. This seems cost and time intensive and I'm not even sure Apple is still pursuing this, as you still got many countries apart from the major ones such as UK, France, Germany where essential services are missing.

Add to this the fact that other popular services such as Netflix are not available in Europe either (ok, they are now in the UK) and as such offerings such as the Apple TV are extremely unattractive over there. The lack of iTunes Radio in Europe is just another example of this.



Percentage of world population with access to music in each ecosystem, respectively:






Percentage of world population with access to movies in each ecosystem, respectively:







Edited by MacBook Pro - 6/28/13 at 1:17pm
post #47 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post


Percentage of world population with access (to each ecosystem respectively):


 

Thanks for the graphic.

 

Yes, it's all nice and fine but those numbers are very general. Sure, lots of people can access the iTunes Music Store and the App Store. And both are fantastic. However, other services such as Movies and TV Shows, rentals, etc are still a major problem in many countries. That's what I meant in saying that it will still take a lot of time and effort to bring those services to many European markets.

post #48 of 106

Who cares about the cost of the phone?

 

I am an European with strong ties to US and Canada and have a Norwegian subscription iPhone 5, an ATT iPhone 4 (Company issued), a dumbphone US at ATT (my cost), and my youngest son and wife have a Canadian dumbphone each (Samsung, hate to say that, at Rogers) and an Erichson each (Android; aways screws up the blutooth in my car to the point that I have to turn over and turn off ignition to reset the d.... system), which incredibly enough never happens on my 6 years old Windows Mobile HTC.

Well I guess you can say I have some experience with phones and carriers. Regarding phones, well in my opinion there is not much choice if you want quality, but costwise it obviously is about the cost of the service, and here is my opinion:

 

Europe: White collar crime, but getting better

US: Highway robbery

Canada: Organized crime

post #49 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

The bottom line is that Apple is kicking ass in the US, and the iPhone continues to remain supreme, and will continue to do so in the future also.

 

Yep, the iPhone "sells" well anywhere that there are subsidies (or other incentives) to cover most of its price.  

 

So yes, the US is an especially important market for Apple, as almost 1/4 of their iPhone sales come from there.  (Only about 1/20 of Samsung's smartphone sales do.)

post #50 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

So Apple needs to start making cheap phones to cater to Europe?

Don't forget jumbotron-size screens.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #51 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post

No, but Apple needs to get three things in order in Europe:

1.) Work with carries in order to ensure better subsidy rates, similar to the US ones.
2.) Stop screwing European customers over and charge appropriate prices, similar to US ones.
3.) Ensure you got an attractive ecosystem within iTunes in all European countries.

Regarding point number two, let me clarify. In Europe, I paid 789 Euros for a 32GB iPhone 5, whereas it costs 749 Dollars in the US. The European price is therefore about 1026 Dollars. I'd be really curious to see how many of those Apple would sell in the US at that rate. It's just crazy.
So how many Euros does a 32GB Galaxy S4 cost?
post #52 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post

However, other services such as Movies and TV Shows, rentals, etc are still a major problem in many countries.

Unless his post edit included said image, he already posted an image that answers your question.

Originally Posted by asdasd

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post #53 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post

 

Thanks for the link, very interesting. I wasn't aware of the differences to Apple's competition to be honest, since I don't use any of their services. Clearly they seem to fare pretty well in comparison. However, as an EU customer I can safely say that I wish we'd have the same or a similar level of service US customers have.

 

Regarding S4 prices, you might be right, however also compare the difference in subsidies. Samsung and Android phones in general seem to be much more affordable on contract than iPhones.

 

However, I also believe Apple got a bit of a problem with brand perception in Europe. They don't seem able to clearly deliver the message about why they are better than their competition.

Honestly, I just can't follow you. You seem to be saying all these things about what Apple must do to court European consumers. You don't really understand Apple. They make the best products they know how without cutting the corners the way their competitors do while turning a sustainable profit to continue to exist and make more great products at enormous scale and efficiency. They build out retail stores and make carrier agreements to get those phones into the hands of as many consumers in as many markets as can sustain those purchases. If those consumers try the device and like it, they'll buy it. If they do not try it, well what more should Apple do? If they do try the device and like it, they'll buy it. Really, WHO CARES? Does Paul Smith shout from the rooftops about why his shirts are better at $250 each, as opposed to a shirt from the GAP that costs $30? Should he? I argue no on both counts. You can either feel the difference in quality and can afford it or you can feel the difference and do not care, or you cannot eel the difference and can't afford it, or whatever. No one can make you value another product and Apple does not try too hard to convince folks. 

 

If Europeans or Americans or anyone else cannot tell for themselves that there is an appreciable difference or doesn't appreciate that difference, Apple doesn't much care. You (they) are not their target market. Period. Again, I don't think it's Apple (but I don't know anything about their European marketing efforts). What I do know is that if Europeans buy lower build quality phones with more malware, less customer support, a less robust ecosystem, poorer update schedules and less resale value, then it's their problem, bad judgement, poor taste, what have you (and not Apple's problem). Apple is not trying to be all things to all people. 

 

Having said all that, I think they will address these markets with a ~$400 unsubsidized iPhone. But guess what, then you'll have folks that'll wonder why they can't make a $200 iPhone. That is what is called a race to the bottom, which you should know will only result in a corporate death spiral.

For your sake, I hope you're right.
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post #54 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carthusia View Post

Having said all that, I think they will address these markets with a ~$400 unsubsidized iPhone. But guess what, then you'll have folks that'll wonder why they can't make a $200 iPhone. That is what is called a race to the bottom, which you should know will only result in a corporate death spiral.
In some ways this is like opening up Pandora's box. Perhaps why Apple hasn't done it yet. Also we know Apple won't do crap and its hard to do nice on the cheap.
post #55 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

Yep, the iPhone "sells" well anywhere that there are subsidies (or other incentives) to cover most of its price.  

 

So yes, the US is an especially important market for Apple, as almost 1/4 of their iPhone sales come from there.  (Only about 1/20 of Samsung's smartphone sales do.)

I would also argue that iPhone sells better in those countries and regions where iPhone owners can take maximum advantage of the iOS ecosystem (iCloud, apps, iTunes, Apple retail stores/Genius bars, etc). As mentioned above, building out those resources globally is a tremendous effort beyond which practically no one (including myself) on this forum can comprehend. These services cannot just be slapped together.

 

Reducing the value and success of iPhone only to subsidies is wearing a bit thin. You personally seem to cherry-pick the negatives and marginalize the positives when it comes to Apple's value-added contributions to end-users. You try to come across as fair-and-balanced, yet this bias of yours is quite transparent to anyone reading your posts on a consistent basis.


Edited by Carthusia - 6/28/13 at 2:58pm
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post #56 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

So if these numbers are to be believed (and I'm always doubtful) does this mean in the US Samsung is taking market share from other Android manufactures and not Apple?

No. According to these charts, not only is Android the #1 mobile OS, also its market share growth was more than doubled iOS for the quarter. The growth came at the cost of other mobile OSes, particularly BlackBerry.

 

The takeaway from these charts is that this is a duopoly with all other mobile OSes having what little market share they hold continue to erode away. Or, in other words, BlackBerry is especially doomed given that their market share is continuing to decline even after BB10's release.


Edited by Negafox - 6/28/13 at 2:45pm
post #57 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carthusia View Post

You [KDarling] personally seem to cherry-pick the negatives and marginalize the positives when it comes to Apple's value-added contributions to end-users. You try to come across as fair-and-balanced, yet this bias of yours is quite transparent to anyone reading your posts on a consistent basis.

 

Well, that's an understatement.

post #58 of 106
According to BGR, Samsung's subsidies are 10% higher than Apple's in the US. Yet the media keeps pushing this canard that somehow only Apple benefits from subsidies...

http://bgr.com/2013/06/28/samsung-phone-subsidies-iphone/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheBoyGeniusReport+(BGR+%7C+Boy+Genius+Report)
post #59 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

 

I think Tim Cook has played a winning hand.  If you look at the adoption of all 1080p phones from Samsung, LG, HTC and Sony and compare them to Apple's single iPhone 5 model, the device web usage looks like this:

 

https://twitter.com/StevenNoyes/status/350629072201732096/photo/1

 

NOTE: StatCounter does not weight the data in any way so it will overweight countries like Turkey and slightly underweight countries like the US. If finally understand why Net Applications weights their data.

 

This looks like Apple has a very winning strategy on their most recent flagship model. Not shown is the current iPhone 5 usage curve is still trending upward at about the same rate as the time period between 28 to 84 days after its release. In short, it has maintained strong demand driving the relative web usage up at a near consistent rate. The 1080P phones are already showing a significant slowing trend meaning they have already starting to near saturation.

 

That must be why telcos like non-Apple phones. They get the contract and the phones never use data. They win on both sides. 

post #60 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post

 

Anyway, so let's add 9% to the US price, which is about $67 and the iPhone price goes up to $816. That's still a difference of more than $200 to European prices.

 

You're the one complaining! Why don't you tell us what the tax rate is where you live?

 

My guess 23%. There you go... there's your $ 200.00.

post #61 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Negafox View Post

No. According to these charts, not only is Android the #1 mobile OS, also its market share growth was more than doubled iOS for the quarter. The growth came at the cost of other mobile OSes, particularly BlackBerry.

The takeaway from these charts is that this is a duopoly with all other mobile OSes having what little market share they hold continue to erode away. Or, in other words, BlackBerry is especially doomed given that their market share is continuing to decline even after BB10's release.
I was referring to the top smartphone OEM chart. Only Apple and Samsung had positive growth between the two periods being measured. HTC, Motorola and Blackberry were all down. Which makes me wonder if Samsung is taking share more from HTC and Motorola than from Apple.
post #62 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post

 

No, but Apple needs to get three things in order in Europe:

 

1.) Work with carries in order to ensure better subsidy rates, similar to the US ones.

2.) Stop screwing European customers over and charge appropriate prices, similar to US ones.

3.) Ensure you got an attractive ecosystem within iTunes in all European countries.

 

Regarding point number two, let me clarify. In Europe, I paid 789 Euros for a 32GB iPhone 5, whereas it costs 749 Dollars in the US. The European price is therefore about 1026 Dollars. I'd be really curious to see how many of those Apple would sell in the US at that rate. It's just crazy.

 

You've already lost at number 1.)....  The rest of the world is not a fan of subsidies at all- it is far more likely that the subsidy racket in the US will go away than the rest of world will convert to it.

 

Unless...............  (doodeloo doodeloo doodeloo)....

 

Eddy Cue:  Hello 5 largest carriers in Europe...

Carriers: Hi....

EC:  We're Apple and we need high margins, but need you to sell more phones.  So... My proposal is this.  You continue to pay us $650 for our phones, but instead of selling them to consumers for $650 we want you to sell them to your customers for $200.

Carriers:  <crickets>.......

EC: So, who is on board?

Carriers:....   ummmm, Let me get this right, we'll be losing a ton of money in order to make you profits?.....

EC:  No, you won't.

Carriers:   ???

EC: You will change your rates to customers from $50/mo to $100/mo to more closely match US rates.  That will change your gross on a 2 year contract from $1200 to $2400.  That's $1200 more!  Taking out the Apple subsidy of $450, you still make $750 more!  Sure, the customers will end up paying more, but that's what we all want anyway, right?

Carriers:  Wow!  That sounds great!  But no way will they go for it.

EC:  They won't have a choice if you all agree to our plan.  But first, let me show you this carefully crafted document from our legal team that states we have no interest in setting prices or any concern for what you charge for rates on our competitors products.  So, ermm..... right, now that that's out of the way, where were we?

Carriers 1:  If I raise my rates to $100/mo and everyone else stays at $50/mo nobody will buy my product.

EC:  Well, you're right, and you are all not allowed to talk together to do that or it would be illegal.  But you know our terms and you know your counterparts have been offered the same terms so if you all agree to it simultaneously individually..... <wink> <wink> <nudge> <nudge>  Now this is important, we, Apple are not telling you the price to set, but if it is any more than $100/mo we're not doing it, and any less than that  your fine, but you are still paying us the same amount of money- so you really can't afford any less than that.

Carriers:  Wow, this is too good to be true....  But if Apple contracts go for $100/mo and Androids go for $50/mo all the business is going to go to Android.

EC: Well, we have this other clause in there...  We can't TELL you to raise your Android contracts from $50/mo, but our clause says whatever price you sell their contracts you have to match that price for Apple.

Carriers:  But if we do that and still have to pay you your guaranteed subsidy of $450 we'll lose our asses!

EC:  Indeed, you will, so you are probably best off setting your Apple price to $100/mo

Carriers:  But that means we would have to set our Android price to $100/mo

EC:  You said that, not me!  <wink>

Carrier Exec:  Ahhhhhh.....  I get it $$$$$$$!  Ohhhh.... and we don't have to guarantee the Android vendors the subsidy, so the extra $1200 from them will be pure profit!!!!

EC:  You are a revolutionary genius who is going to change the telecom industry, my friend!

Carriers:  Well alright then!

EC:  Who's in?

Carriers:  Ummm, we really cant sign this until the others have signed it.

EC:  I've got two in and two on the fence.

Fence sitter:  Marching orders from HQ, can't sign it unless you get the other fence sitter to sign on as well....

EC:  It would be shame for us all to lose this great deal even with 3 just because a 4th wouldn't sing.....  Besides if you sign, I'm sure they will <whistles>

FS: Okay, we're in

Other FS:  We're in too!!!!

 

That's pretty much what it would take to get subsidies in Europe, and that scenario would *never* happen in the real world


Edited by Frood - 6/28/13 at 3:33pm
post #63 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

So if these numbers are to be believed (and I'm always doubtful) does this mean in the US Samsung is taking market share from other Android manufactures and not Apple?

Like I've said multiple times, Samsung doesn't have to beat Apple they just need to beat everyone else, and that's exactly what they're doing.
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post #64 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


I was referring to the top smartphone OEM chart. Only Apple and Samsung had positive growth between the two periods being measured. HTC, Motorola and Blackberry were all down. Which makes me wonder if Samsung is taking share more from HTC and Motorola than from Apple.

There is not enough data to say given the charts are incomplete. The charts imply there was growth with other Android phone manufacturers besides those listed. I would suspect that Samsung directly reduced HTC's market share for that quarter given the popularity of the Galaxy phones. I would be curious to see how that changes now that the HTC One is available.

post #65 of 106
the only real news here is that Windows phone is Totally Failing in the US.

bye-bye
post #66 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogis
So if these numbers are to be believed (and I'm always doubtful) does this mean in the US Samsung is taking market share from other Android manufactures and not Apple?

Well,  no. I do not know to what school author of this article went, but I can tell you that math was not part of it. This chart shows that Apple gained 0.3% of the market and Samsung gained 1.7%. Last I checked, it means that Apple lost 1.4% to Samsung. So this is just "spin doctors" story.

post #67 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

So if these numbers are to be believed (and I'm always doubtful) does this mean in the US Samsung is taking market share from other Android manufactures and not Apple?

There is no right answer to that question when the overall market is growing.

post #68 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrzejls View Post

Well,  no. I do not know to what school author of this article went, but I can tell you that math was not part of it. This chart shows that Apple gained 0.3% of the market and Samsung gained 1.7%. Last I checked, it means that Apple lost 1.4% to Samsung. So this is just "spin doctors" story.

Apple and Samsung are the only companies that sell smartphones?
post #69 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrzejls View Post

Well,  no. I do not know to what school author of this article went, but I can tell you that math was not part of it. This chart shows that Apple gained 0.3% of the market and Samsung gained 1.7%. Last I checked, it means that Apple lost 1.4% to Samsung. So this is just "spin doctors" story.

Goodness, gracious, no! What school did you go to?

post #70 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrzejls View Post

Well,  no. I do not know to what school author of this article went, but I can tell you that math was not part of it. This chart shows that Apple gained 0.3% of the market and Samsung gained 1.7%. Last I checked, it means that Apple lost 1.4% to Samsung. So this is just "spin doctors" story.


Your post is ridiculous.
post #71 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrzejls View Post

Well,  no. I do not know to what school author of this article went, but I can tell you that math was not part of it. This chart shows that Apple gained 0.3% of the market and Samsung gained 1.7%. Last I checked, it means that Apple lost 1.4% to Samsung. So this is just "spin doctors" story.

You should check your check.
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post #72 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrzejls View Post

Well,  no. I do not know to what school author of this article went, but I can tell you that math was not part of it. This chart shows that Apple gained 0.3% of the market and Samsung gained 1.7%. Last I checked, it means that Apple lost 1.4% to Samsung. So this is just "spin doctors" story.

1oyvey.gif1rolleyes.gif

I imagine you realised your mistake as soon as you hit the "SUBMIT" button.
post #73 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by rasimo View Post


Apple and Samsung are the only companies that sell smartphones?


And your statement rely to my post exactly how?

post #74 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayz View Post


1oyvey.gif1rolleyes.gif

I imagine you realised your mistake as soon as you hit the "SUBMIT" button.


No. I did not. I guess your math is not that good either. If you and I compete and you move forward 0.3 yards and I move 1.7 yards, guess where you are in relation to me. You are 1.4 yards behind me. I hope that this example helped you to understand.

post #75 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by piot View Post


Your post is ridiculous.


No math skills either, right?

post #76 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayz View Post


1oyvey.gif1rolleyes.gif

I imagine you realised your mistake as soon as you hit the "SUBMIT" button.

Lets look at it from Apple vs. Samsung perspective.

 

First quarter:

 

38.9 + 21.3 = 60.2 total

38.9 / 60.2 = 64.6% for Apple

21.3 / 60.2 = 35.4% for Samsung

 

Second quarter:

 

39.2 + 23.0 = 62.2 total

39.2 / 62.2 = 63.0% for Apple

23.0 / 62.2 = 37.0% for Samsung

 

Therefore, Apple lost some market share to Samsung.


Edited by Negafox - 6/28/13 at 5:33pm
post #77 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrzejls View Post

Well,  no. I do not know to what school author of this article went, but I can tell you that math was not part of it. This chart shows that Apple gained 0.3% of the market and Samsung gained 1.7%. Last I checked, it means that Apple lost 1.4% to Samsung. So this is just "spin doctors" story.

 

The numbers are a percentage of the market as it existed at the time.

The overall smartphone market grew tremendously, and Apples share of the larger market this year grew even larger. 

Samsung also did tremendously and grew as a percentage within that growing market.

 

So if you're on an Apple site the line will be:

Apple gains 0.3 market share!  Apples share much larger than Samsungs!

 

Which is true and makes it sound like Apple is "winning"

 

If you go to a fandroid site the line will be:

Samsung gains 1.7% market share!  Samsung's growth alone nearly 6x Apple's growth for the year!  Android market share still much larger than Apple's.

 

That is also true and makes it sound like Samsung is "winning"

 

Who is losing share to whom really can't be determined by the data.  Your statement is 'probably wrong but possibly true.'  If you could prove that Apple would have gained 1.7% market share, but only gained 0.3% because all those users that would have bought Apple phones bought only Samsung phones instead- then your statement is true.  Did HTC lose share because people chose Samsung instead, or because people converted to Apple?  Most likely some of both.

post #78 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post


So yes, the US is an especially important market for Apple, as almost 1/4 of their iPhone sales come from there.  (Only about 1/20 of Samsung's smartphone sales do.)

That's why Samsung's ASP is so pathetic, and why they are too embarrassed to reveal actual numbers sold.
post #79 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post


Haha, I did indeed begin, however your statement was kind of ignorant, I stand by that.

Anyway, so let's add 9% to the US price, which is about $67 and the iPhone price goes up to $816. That's still a difference of more than $200 to European prices.

'Haha' indeed. You appear to be the truly ignorant one on the issue. Please educate yourself about VAT, retail distribution costs, end-of-life takedown laws, labor and overtime costs (including the indirect costs of employment), exchange rate uncertainty, and more generally, pricing-to-market.
post #80 of 106
Didn't Shamesung launch their s4 that sold a billion units the first day? Thought they'd have a bigger jump from that.
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