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Safari 7.0 to bring web notifications to OS X Mavericks

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 
Apple is bringing its push notifications to the web, enabling support for websites to push updates to OS X Maverick users in Safari 7.0 even when their browser isn't running.

web notifications
Source: Apple


The new web push notification system in Safari 7.0 can be used to deliver websites' breaking news, sport scores, auction alerts (as depicted by Apple in its feature preview, above), or other information.

web notifications


As with Apple's existing native app and cloud service notifications, users must opt-in to allow access to the feature, as demonstrated in a test site set up (above) by Connor LaCombe at kandutech.net.

After a user allows access, the site lets them compose a new notification. The demo server then associates the user's push token with the message and forwards it to Apple's push servers, which then delivers it to the user.

web notifications
web notifications
web notifications


Managing notifications & Do Not Disturb mode



Web notifications look and work like any other notification alert. Their appearance can be customized by the user in System Preferences to show up as a temporary banner that vanishes on its own, or an alert that must be clicked to dismiss.

web notifications


The user can also turn off notifications by service or system wide using Do Not Disturb, a feature introduced in iOS 6 that will appear on the Mac in OS X Mavericks. As on mobile devices, users can set Do Not Disturb to disable incoming notification alerts during a set period, when the screen is asleep or during presentations.

web notifications


Macs running OS X Mavericks will automatically enter Do Not Disturb mode when a projector is attached or when using AirPlay Mirroring (a feature Apple's head of software development Craig Federighi noted in the WWDC keynote) although this can be turned off to allow updates.

A history of Apple's push notifications



With the opening the App Store in 2008's iOS 2.0, Apple's then head of iOS development Scott Forstall announced Apple would be setting up a centralized Push Notification Service as a mechanism for allowing apps to respond to updates from outside services without their needing to remain active in the background, constantly listening (and eating up battery power).

In addition to greatly lowering the iPhone's battery consumption compared to the prevailing background software model used by BlackBerry and Microsoft's Windows Mobile, Apple also used its new push notification system to power MobileMe's push messaging features.


iPhone's push notification service


Apple's overview of its push notification service.


However, Apple greatly underestimated the overwhelming demand for both apps and push notifications, sending the company back to the drawing board and delaying the rollout of Push notifications until iOS 3.0, after a stress testing beta program involving the Associated Press and other app developers.

In late 2009, Google, a major iOS developer, filed a patent for "notification of mobile device events," describing a feature it would later add to Android, albeit without a security model like Apple's. This resulted in both an adware/spam plague for Android users, but also bragging rights for Android enthusiasts who can now claim Apple simply copied its Notification Center from Android rather than having laid all the groundwork for touchscreen smartphones, a functional app store and secure, battery efficient notifications system.

In 2010, Apple brought push notifications to the Mac as an API, initially to support FaceTime notifications and then more broadly as a public API in 2011's OS X Lion.



Notification Center (above) appeared on the Mac as an end-user facing feature in OS X Mountain Lion last year (pictured above), after first making an appearance on Apple's mobile devices in iOS 5 the previous year.
post #2 of 42
That they call it Safari 7, is ridiculous.
post #3 of 42
Anyone remember PointCast? Let's hope Apple gets it right.
post #4 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by japm View Post

That they call it Safari 7, is ridiculous.

It's the seventh version of Safari. 1eek.gif1bugeye.gif1confused.gif1hmm.gif1rolleyes.gif1oyvey.gif

You'd prefer Safari 5S?

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #5 of 42
Safari is tremendously better, faster and smarter. Try it before you complain.
post #6 of 42

Better than Google's Chrome!  Their version numbering is out of control  It's hard to find the latest version number listed on their site nowadays.  Probably changes by the hour.

post #7 of 42
@kjf77 I do remember PointCast. Those people did some interesting things back in the day. Hated when it ended...
post #8 of 42
I thought we already had web notifications in the current safari, never found a website that uses it though
post #9 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

Safari is tremendously better, faster and smarter. Try it before you complain.
 

Yeah it's tremendously better to manage my giant bookmarks collection in a stupid little sidebar instead of the whole window.

 

That's so smart.

post #10 of 42
@kevinneal HTML5 notifications are different than push notifications. With HTML5 notifications, Safari had to remain open, with the website open in a tab. With push notifications, Safari doesn't have to be running and when you click a notification, it'll open the URL passed with it in whatever your default browser is.
post #11 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by japm View Post

 

Yeah it's tremendously better to manage my giant bookmarks collection in a stupid little sidebar instead of the whole window.

 

That's so smart.

 

Well, I for one actually think that sidebar bookmarks are long overdue.

 

Never liked managing bookmarks in this separate window, always takes you completely out of context every time you need to move bookmarks around.

post #12 of 42
"That they call it Safari 7, is ridiculous."

Well, 7 does come after 6. Since we're at Safari 6 right now, what exactly would you call it?
post #13 of 42
This seems like a replacement for having to actualy check a website. Do people really need do not disturb on a Mac, Can't they turn the darn thing off, takes 10 seconds or so.

I get why during a meeting and so, but do that many people use it, and even more so, do those people need it.
post #14 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post

 

Well, I for one actually think that sidebar bookmarks are long overdue.

 

Never liked managing bookmarks in this separate window, always takes you completely out of context every time you need to move bookmarks around.

 

I've got a wild idea! Let the user do it both ways. It could even have a place to select which model the user prefers (they could even have a window where the user could decide which one they prefer and call it Preferences). I think I remember seeing something like this before in Mail, or was it iTunes, I know it was the Finder, naw maybe it was...

 

Note to self: better trademark that term 'Preferences' before someone else claims it is too generic. 

post #15 of 42
People still _manage_ bookmarks manually?
post #16 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by japm View Post

Yeah it's tremendously better to manage my giant bookmarks collection in a stupid little sidebar instead of the whole window.

 

That's so smart.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrian M View Post

People still _manage_ bookmarks manually?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

You should just stay off the Internet until you have something useful and meaningful to say, which appears likely to be never.

 

@anonymouse:

 

I guess that means me too since I prefer choice.

post #17 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

You should just stay off the Internet until you have something useful and meaningful to say, which appears likely to be never.

 

Hey anonymouse,

 

This is the comments section of a Safari 7 article...

...and I made the comment that I don't like the changes to the bookmarks, because it cripples functionality that I need.

 

Why exactly does that bother you?

 

Why should I "stay off the internet" because of it?

 

Isn't this the soul purpose of a comments section... to comment?

 

You are basically telling me to shut up because you don't agree with me, which is not very "useful and meaningful" either.

post #18 of 42
Chrome is a pile of bloat. WebKit 2 is already smoking from trunk since the Blink fork. So glad that happened.
post #19 of 42
Isn't it ironic how, despite the lauding of HTML etc. based apps on crapforms ("crap"'s similar enough to "plat" - WebOS, Windows whatever, Blackberry, Firefox: basically platforms with no developers), Apple not only spear-headed web apps but have given them great support in iOS and OS X.

Ha.
post #20 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by japm View Post

 

Yeah it's tremendously better to manage my giant bookmarks collection in a stupid little sidebar instead of the whole window.

 

That's so smart.

 

You're bookmarking it wrong

Help! I'm trapped in a white dungeon of amazing precision and impeccable tolerances!

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Help! I'm trapped in a white dungeon of amazing precision and impeccable tolerances!

Reply
post #21 of 42

Daniel Eran Dilger, padding out articles since 2005.

 

Seriously, the 5 year old history of push notifications was deemed necessary for a current news article?

 

Hire an editor and ditch the superfluous fluff AI.

censored

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censored

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post #22 of 42
The memory management of Mavericks Safari is so much better on my late 2008 Air than Mountain Lion. Like actually noticeably better.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #23 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Daniel Eran Dilger, padding out articles since 2005.

Seriously, the 5 year old history of push notifications was deemed necessary for a current news article?

Hire an editor and ditch the superfluous fluff AI.

It's informative for me. If you don't like it, just skip it.
post #24 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

The memory management of Mavericks Safari is so much better on my late 2008 Air than Mountain Lion. Like actually noticeably better.

Pretty cool. Can't wait to try it out on my 2012 Air.
post #25 of 42

I can see many people liking notifications. I find them distracting and I dislike applications moving to the front, interrupting my work (because they're so much more important than me, I guess). As long as the interruptions can be disabled, there's no harm.

 

Pushing updates via force-feeding is another thing. That would NOT be cool. It can quickly turn into a major mess.
 

Hot tub blonde, pouring champagne: "Say when..." Dangerfield: "Right after this drink."
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Hot tub blonde, pouring champagne: "Say when..." Dangerfield: "Right after this drink."
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post #26 of 42

Alright. Can we have this on iOS please, so we don't have to install CNN just for a breaking news?

post #27 of 42
First kill RSS, then add the "novel" and proprietary push notifications.
The RSS subscriptions could have been picked up by a background task and locally added to the notification section just like new mail is added, but then the NSA would have a harder time figuring out who's interested in what...
post #28 of 42

Sooo true.

 

The RSS implementation was awesome in Safari, there was no reason to take it away.

post #29 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Daniel Eran Dilger, padding out articles since 2005.

 

Seriously, the 5 year old history of push notifications was deemed necessary for a current news article?

 

Hire an editor and ditch the superfluous fluff AI.

 

 

He provided the history of Apple's notifications in order to counter Android fanboys' bogus claim that iOS7 copied Android's notifications feature.

post #30 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by japm View Post

Sooo true.

The RSS implementation was awesome in Safari, there was no reason to take it away.

Particularly since it would have been easy to tie it into the Notifications system.
post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcfa View Post


Particularly since it would have been easy to tie it into the Notifications system.

 

The feeder extension optionally supports Notifications and (less intrusively) its toolbar badge displays the new article count.  Even though it only displays article titles it's been a satisfying replacement for Safari's built-in functionality for a few feeds I prefer monitoring directly from the browser.  For the majority of feeds I've always used dedicated OS X and iOS apps feed reader apps.

post #32 of 42
The IOS 7 multitasking looks almost like the multiple page (also full safari history) using same design.
post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by japm View Post

Yeah it's tremendously better to manage my giant bookmarks collection in a stupid little sidebar instead of the whole window.
Then why not simply view them in a whole window?
Option Command B or menu Bookmarks > View.
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post

I've got a wild idea! Let the user do it both ways.
The user can already do it both ways.
post #35 of 42
Just to clarify, this is not a feature of Safari 7.0; instead it is a new feature of Mavericks' notification system that allows web sites to send notifications. It is listed under the 'Notifications' section on Apple's Mavericks web page and there is nothing about it that involves Safari; in fact it explicitly says that Safari is not required. "In addition, you can now sign up with your favorite websites to get breaking news, sports scores, auction alerts, and more %u2014 even if Safari isn%u2019t running."
post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregLomow View Post

Just to clarify, this is not a feature of Safari 7.0; instead it is a new feature of Mavericks' notification system that allows web sites to send notifications. It is listed under the 'Notifications' section on Apple's Mavericks web page and there is nothing about it that involves Safari; in fact it explicitly says that Safari is not required. "In addition, you can now sign up with your favorite websites to get breaking news, sports scores, auction alerts, and more %u2014 even if Safari isn%u2019t running."

If that is so, and RSS is not going away, can you see a method to use RSS to drive a notification? 

Thnx

post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by nbiquity View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by GregLomow View Post

Just to clarify, this is not a feature of Safari 7.0; instead it is a new feature of Mavericks' notification system that allows web sites to send notifications. It is listed under the 'Notifications' section on Apple's Mavericks web page and there is nothing about it that involves Safari; in fact it explicitly says that Safari is not required. "In addition, you can now sign up with your favorite websites to get breaking news, sports scores, auction alerts, and more %u2014 even if Safari isn%u2019t running."
If that is so, and RSS is not going away, can you see a method to use RSS to drive a notification? 
Thnx

I must assume this is a rhetorical question...
...obviously, one could write code into the notification system where it, instead of Safari, subscribes to the RSS feed. The notification system and Safari could use IPC or some other mechanism to exchange that information with each other, just as Safari is involved when subscribing to one of the new-fangled notifications.

The only difference, is that RSS was while maybe not the most perfect thing, a standard thing, while this new stuff is tied into Apple's eco system. Apple starts doing what made me hate M$ so much: try to turn the open internet into an environment degraded by proprietary "enhancements". Meanwhile your new notification subscriptions go straight to the NSA, so they likely are notified before you 1wink.gif
post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by japm View Post

 

Yeah it's tremendously better to manage my giant bookmarks collection in a stupid little sidebar instead of the whole window.

 

That's so smart.

You can still manage your giant collection in a whole window. Now even without the blue Collections sidebar.

JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
Reply
JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
Reply
post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcfa View Post


I must assume this is a rhetorical question...
...obviously, one could write code into the notification system where it, instead of Safari, subscribes to the RSS feed. The notification system and Safari could use IPC or some other mechanism to exchange that information with each other, just as Safari is involved when subscribing to one of the new-fangled notifications.

The Notification Center would be a terrible RSS reader if you have more than a few feeds, and checking subscribed feeds is the exact opposite of getting things pushed.

 

Someone could write a service that takes RSS feeds and pushes them to your Mac.

 

 


Quote:
Meanwhile your new notification subscriptions go straight to the NSA
 

They are probably more likely to know who get the RSS feeds.


Edited by JLL - 8/1/13 at 3:36am
JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
Reply
JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
Reply
post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLL View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by rcfa View Post

I must assume this is a rhetorical question...

...obviously, one could write code into the notification system where it, instead of Safari, subscribes to the RSS feed. The notification system and Safari could use IPC or some other mechanism to exchange that information with each other, just as Safari is involved when subscribing to one of the new-fangled notifications.
The Notification Center would be a terrible RSS reader if you have more than a few feeds, and checking subscribed feeds is the exact opposite of getting things pushed.

Nobody said anything about the notification center being an RSS reader, it's just about that: being notified that new articles are ready. After all, it's not an e-mail reader, either, yet I see when I get new e-mails and the subject line and the first few lines. So it's about as well or as badly suited to let me know about new e-mails as it is for letting me know about new RSS article.

Also, E-mail isn't pushed, either. Some may (iCloud), but certainly not POP, and random third party e-mail servers. What obviously must be happening is that Apple's Message framework somehow checks for e-mails in the background and then pushes the notifications. So really nothing much different than would be needed for RSS. Heck, there was a time when Mall could be used as an RSS reader, and so that would have been working in one go: just tag the resulting notifications differently such as to allow for differentiating between RSS and E-mail messages.

The biggest issue I have with Apple's latest software strategy is that it's app centric, rather than document centric, things get split up, rather than unified. Whatever happend with concepts like "global inbox", or "unified time management" (splitting calendar and todo/reminder items into different apps, WTF?) ?
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLL View Post

Someone could write a service that takes RSS feeds and pushes them to your Mac.

Yes, could. Someone also could write a Finder replacement, or a Mail.app replacement, or an iWork replacement. Fact however is, that these third party solutions will never as well integrated as something Apple does, because what Apple does becomes a platform standard that all sorts of third party developers can adopt and tie into. Third party solutions always compete with each other, and thus things get inconsistent, hence I prefer infrastructure type things to be done by Apple.
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