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Editorial: Can Apple survive 2013? - Page 6

post #201 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post

The reason Apple isn't "winning" in emerging markets is because they don't have a low cost iPhone and haven't focused on gaining that market. It's debatable whether there's enough money to be made, even.

 

I think that the definition of "enough money" is relative.  

 

Apple went into the phone market only expecting to get a relatively small percentage, and yet that was "enough money" for them at the time.

 

Now when we're talking about markets with billions of potential buyers, even a smaller profit per device can become "enough"   1wink.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Well I think it's only fair to give Ive more than 6-8 months to prove he can do more than hardware design. iOS 7hasn't even shipped yet and people are already calling for him to be demoted.  Ridiculous.  Lets see how polished this new version of iOS is in a year or two.  

 

I dunno.  At this stage of iPhone existence, customers shouldn't have to use an unpolished version for a year or two while a new UI designer gains experience.  The smartest thing to do would be to wait to deploy it until it's more polished.  Apple already got one black eye with their maps going out a bit too soon.  That should be a wakeup call to not rush something out.

 

Quote:
But one thing is for sure, we're getting features from Federighi and Ive that we never got with Jobs and Forstall.  And now Federighi and Ive get to be tagged as the ones copying other OS's for giving us features we probably should have had in iOS 5.

 

Good point.  It is nice to see things put in that people have asked for (and jailbroken to get) for years now.

 

As for "copying", most consumers don't care one whit about who came first, so I don't think F and I worry about it either.

post #202 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by See Flat View Post

Headline is a question...

"Can Apple survive 2013?"

 

I will say YES!

 

and yes I did read the editorial but got bored and stopped. 

 

So you did not read it.

post #203 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


Let's see what great apps Android users are missing out on

Top Paid Apps

1. WhatsApp Msgr
2. Minecraft
3. Where's My Mickey?
4. Heads Up!
5. SponggeBob Moves In
6. Contra:Evolution
7. Icebreaker: A Viking Voyage
8. Facetune
9. AfterLight
10. Kick the Buddy: No Mercy

Top Free Apps

1. Despicable Me: Minions Rush
2. Sprinkle: Water splashing game
3. Candy Crush Saga
4. Nick
5.Google Maps (who would've thunk?)
6. Escape If You Can
7. Secret Passages: Hidden Objects
8. Battery Saver (wait, what? really?)
9. Vine
10. Can You Escape

Top Grossing Apps

1. Candy Crush Saga
2. Clash of Clans
3. Pandora
4. Modern War
5. MARVEL War of Heroes
6. The Simpsons: Tapped Out
7. Hay Day
8. Kingdoms Of Camelot
9. Minecraft
10. DoubleDown Casino


Looks like the vast majority of people use their iPhones as a glorified hand held gaming device. It really doesn't look like Androiders are missing much.


Trivial or not, most (maybe all?) of those are available in Google Play.

 

Platform wars are only for OS marketers and ardent fans; most serious devs (and nearly all of the profitable ones) don't choose, they simply deploy to both.

post #204 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrangerFX View Post

Even if you are a huge Apple fan... ...think for a moment about how much it would suck if there was no competing Android platform.

The world would be a better place and worthless idiots wouldn't be making money off of theft.
Quote:
Competition is a good thing

So maybe if we actually had some competition, we'd have a better thing, huh.
Quote:
I think that if I were not an iOS developer that I would prefer Android for its hacking potential and app anarchy.

You'd prefer having your app stolen 95% of the time, would you? 1hmm.gif
Quote:
I don't see Apple ever competing in that market. That is the kind of thing that competition brings. The vast majority of the world's population will never be able to afford an iPhone (not even a "low cost" iPhone).

Agreed, and Apple should never try to sell to them.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #205 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by aBeliefSystem View Post

I got halfway through and realised it was simply all 'internalised promotion material'. It completely forgets Apple's problem is the web and the fact that while Google makes up a major part of the web Apple has fat too low a presence here. I'd suggest Google needed Android for the web so Android works because it is such a major part of the web. IOS now has a major world problem, that being that world sales are emulating the history of Blackberry and Symbian. Apple's low web presence might in fact make it it a long slow process to recovery.

What world problem?

 

For example: if we look at the rise in web usage of the iPhone 5 to every single 1080p based screen phone (HTC One, GS4, LG Optimus G, Sony...) the web usage uptake from general availability looks like:

 

https://twitter.com/StevenNoyes/status/350629072201732096/photo/1

 

Now, this is just the single model iPhone 5 against many top-end flag ship model phones from several manufactures. So I ask, "What web problem does Apple have?" The OS with a web problem is Android. People do not seem to use Android as much for accessing the web and/or running applications. If we look at data world wide, iOS rules the web when compared to Android:

 

http://www.netmarketshare.com/?source=NASite

 

Take a look a the Mobile OS Trend and ask what Web Problem Apple has with iOS. If Android has been outselling iOS by 3:1 for the past year as the Android fans claim, why is Android's web presence so lacking?

post #206 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by poksi View Post

 

common storage area is equal to disk partition. means any file can be accessed by any app. security hole in general. are you familiar with sandboxing? this was original idea and it works: app have their own sandboxed file system, which is available only to application code. period. 

 

If the filesystem is properly implemented, any file can only be accessed by an app which has permission to read that file. A downloads folder need not be world-readable and world-writable. There are already many third-party filesystem apps which implement a sandboxed general storage area, but the user has to manually sync the files with other apps. If Apple were to bake a files app into iOS and provide APIs for other apps to sync with it, that might kill some of the more awkward workflows (such as attaching files to an email reply) without necessarily introducing security holes. 

post #207 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by aBeliefSystem View Post

 

Apple throttles web apps. Apple were never the ones promoting HTML 5 apps. They know full well you cannot monopolise them so why support them?

Apple has multiple sessions at WWDC talking about writing Web Apps. Do you even know what you are talking about? I don't think you do.

post #208 of 266
Why don't people update their software, even a month after release?
post #209 of 266
Did they mention the web throttling? Has it become dated news yet? The last I knew was that Apple iOS devices run web applications two-and-a-half times more slowly compared to Safari.
post #210 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by aBeliefSystem View Post

Did they mention the web throttling? Has it become dated news yet? The last I knew was that Apple iOS devices run web applications two-and-a-half times more slowly compared to Safari.


Didn't Apple fix that years ago?

post #211 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by aBeliefSystem View Post

Did they mention the web throttling? Has it become dated news yet? The last I knew was that Apple iOS devices run web applications two-and-a-half times more slowly compared to Safari.
Your information is amazingly dated and has been wrong for some time.
post #212 of 266
What a load of rambling BS, crapolla. Writers should have to get a license to write, revoke this writers. There went 5 minutes of my life I'll never get back. Apple isn't doomed, far from it. They are the solid rock that can't be broken.
post #213 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenapple3317 View Post

What a load of rambling BS, crapolla. Writers should have to get a license to write, revoke this writers. There went 5 minutes of my life I'll never get back. Apple isn't doomed, far from it. They are the solid rock that can't be broken.

Considering the point of the article was that Apple is NOT doomed, did you actually read it?
post #214 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by graxspoo View Post

Android is a great phone OS. I was an iPhone user for years, but I jumped to the Android side of things because I'm a cheapskate (saved over 2k over 2 years switching to Android on Virgin Mobile). I can do everything on my Android phone I could do on my iPhone. In some ways its more capable. I like being able to download stuff from the internet, for example. It's nice having a small file system on my phone that you can actually access. I like the way Google Voice integrates into the phone (Someone stalking you? Block their calls. Permanently.) I prefer Google services over Apple services, and mobile is a lot about the service back-bone rather than the actual device or OS. I think it's absolutely crazy that Apple is trying to do all this stuff (map service, cloud service etc etc) on their own. It leaves their customers with less choice, and it means that Apple has to devote significant resources to maintaining aspects of their operations which are not profit centers (how exactly are they going to monetize their map service?)
Apple makes fantastic hardware (though the glass on the back of the iPhone 4 and 5 is plain stupid) and their OS is solid (though I hate the games they play with developers and the app store) so it's a nice solution for a lot of people.
On the other hand, Android, while less reliable and more "tweaky", gets the job done as well, and is actually a better choice for people that want maximum flexibility, the best access to Google services, and are maybe even a little cheap. Plus, Widgets!

 

Thanks. This is a great example of what you're supposed to do: if you like Android, buy it and be happy. Tell us what you like and don't like; opinions are welcome. When people start down the road of arguing that Apple (or its apologists) are wrong for not liking what they like, or wrong for not agreeing with the way they look at tech, then nothing is gained. The forum spirals into personal arguments. You kept an open mind about what other people like, and that's so rare on these forums!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post

Would someone be willing to explain the essential difference between a tablet and a notebook? I see this distinction made a lot but have never really understood its justification. With the except of form factor, the distinction seems like an artificial barrier rooted in culture rather than technical merit. To me, smartphones and tablets are highly portable computers with touch interfaces. They run general purpose operating systems, albeit optimized for touch and low-memory/low-power environments. Why, then, are concepts familiar from Macs (such as downloading files to a common storage area) to be feared on tablets? Do touch interfaces make downloading files more dangerous? Why is it more secure if you associate a file with a program immediately rather than later?

 

A serious question that deserves a serious answer. Here's my take.

 

Apple and Microsoft take polar opposite stances on tablets. Yours is closer to Microsoft's: a tablet is another PC form factor, as Steve Ballmer said at All Things D. This has always been Microsoft's vision, going back to the tablet PC of the early 1990s. The stylus replaced the mouse, but otherwise, the tablet was a keyboard-less Windows laptop with a touch screen. With Windows 8, Microsoft simply gave its old tablet PC idea a new coat of (Metro) paint and added the capacitive touch screen.

 

Apple takes a more radical approach. Even before iOS, I remember Steve Jobs saying to Walt Mossberg that eventually, the file system (Finder) would be something that only "pros" would use, and that Spotlight would be how Mac users would someday launch apps, find files, etc. Spotlight is effectively "google search for your local system hard drive" and more or less eliminates location as something users have to know (or care) about. So iOS took that idea one step further: if you don't need to know where a file is to access it, you don't need Finder (file browser). You cannot open files outside of an app, iOS adopted an app-centric user interface: you browse your files within the app. And for most people who use iOS devices, that's sufficient, and the upside is that operating system functions such as "choosing programs to associate with file (types)" don't intrude on their user experience. They just see apps and content ("my picture", "my video", "my songs"), never the file system beneath it. If you saw the Mavericks demo, and you recall the new Category and Tagging features of the file system, you'll see that this eventually will obviate the need to use folders to organize your files because you can more easily sift and sort files by category and/or tag. 

 

As for your question about the difference between a tablet and notebook, this file management example is just one expression of a broader philosophical difference between Apple and Microsoft on tablets. Apple's uses the term "post-PC" to describe computing devices that aren't the classic "personal computer" as we knew it over the last 30 years. Things like iPhones, iPods, iPads, and AppleTV are examples of this. They are purposeful information processing devices. Apple TV, for example, lets me rent and watch HD movies and TV shows over the Internet (iTunes), right on my TV. iPad lets me run apps, surf the web, read email, read magazines, play games, message and FaceTime friends. A lot of those things were previously only possible with a personal computer. Why not just make personal computers? Because the post-PC devices are simplified, curated, ultra-portable, and maintenance free. When people who have never used any kind of computer pick up and just start using iPads, that's Apple's post-PC vision paying off.

 

Microsoft's is not interested in replacing the PC with a post-PC device (you could argue that Surface RT is just like the iPad, but it's not bold enough at shedding its PC-era design cruft, such as the classic desktop, and ends up being a half-hearted attempt at a post-PC tablet) The odd thing is that Microsoft groks the post-PC idea, and they in fact sell a post-PC device: the Xbox. It's based on a PC, but Microsoft won't, for example, allow it to operate outside of the walled garden of (signed) Xbox games and Xbox Live content. You can't side load any app or game not approved by Microsoft, and you can't even surf the web, or use a mouse and keyboard. It's deliberately limited in purpose. It's not a PC.

 

Since you already stated your preference for having a general purpose operating system on a tablet, Microsoft has your needs covered.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #215 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrangerFX View Post

Even if you are a huge Apple fan (like I am) think for a moment about how much it would suck if there was no competing Android platform. Competition is a good thing no matter how you look at it (unless you are a monopoly). I think that if I were not an iOS developer that I would prefer Android for its hacking potential and app anarchy. If there is something to take away from this article it is that Apple has a very profitable mobile platform while Google and the rest of the Android world have a very low margin, highly fragmented market.

It is impressive to walk into the supermarket and see a fully functional pre-paid Android phone for less than $100. If you just want a decent MP3 player and the ability to load apps, that's a pretty nice device even if you never use it as a phone. I don't see Apple ever competing in that market. That is the kind of thing that competition brings. The vast majority of the world's population will never be able to afford an iPhone (not even a "low cost" iPhone).

 

I don't think about competition in terms of good or bad. I don't wish it away. Competition is an inevitable outcome of any free market with relatively low barriers to entry. Copying is inevitable. While I don't condone copying, it is inevitable, and companies should defend their IP lest their competitors walk all over them with impunity. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post

 

It seems slightly ironic that the US is consuming media increasingly via apps when the iPhone was originally billed as a platform for HTML5 web apps (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Vq993Td6ys)

 

Yes. As far as I can tell, the App Store and its popularity took Apple and Steve Jobs by surprise. But then Steve was also wrong about not wanting to make iPods and iTunes compatible with Windows.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #216 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

[...] I could next write about the prospects of other Android licensees to more effectively take over and destroy Apple, but that would strain credulity.

 

No, it would strain credibility. It cannot affect credulity as that is not within the writer's control.

post #217 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrangerFX View Post

... Competition is a good thing no matter how you look at it (unless you are a monopoly). ...

 

No it's not. Competition itself is entirely neutral about the outcome it produces. It may be good, but it may just as likely be bad.  It may just as easily (perhaps more so) lead to a race to the bottom as a race to the top. There is no law of nature, physical or human, that guarantees that the results of competition will be "good".

post #218 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post

If the filesystem is properly implemented, any file can only be accessed by an app which has permission to read that file. A downloads folder need not be world-readable and world-writable. There are already many third-party filesystem apps which implement a sandboxed general storage area, but the user has to manually sync the files with other apps. If Apple were to bake a files app into iOS and provide APIs for other apps to sync with it, that might kill some of the more awkward workflows (such as attaching files to an email reply) without necessarily introducing security holes. 

Apple may eventually do something similar. For instance, you first-party apps can already share data; for instance, the Mail app can insert photos from the Photos app.

What Apple could do is create an API that allows third-party apps to "tag" specific types of data (photos, videos, documents, etc) that other Apps can access. It would essentially be a reverse of the "Open In" API.

This would be more of a sharing concept than a central file system, and would still be app-centric with no maintenance.

For instance, when inserting a photo into a Pages document, it would show a list of your albums, along with a list of other apps that have photos (such as Camera+), which would list like an album.
post #219 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post


Considering the point of the article was that Apple is NOT doomed, did you actually read it?

I read it and already knew Apple wasn't doomed. It was a very stupid title though and something like "Why Apple isn't doomed in 2013 or beyond" for example would have been a better choice.  But you know who else isn't doomed? Google and Samsung. They will keep on trucking on just fine. No one is doomed with the exception of the also rans like Sony (smart phone division not whole company), Blackberry, LG (again smart phone division only), HTC, Nokia, and others. I expect the Chinese to fill in the gap for the sub $350 phones and squeeze pretty much everyone out of that space including Samsung. If Apple decides to make a phone and sell it off contract for around $449 and another with one with a large screen then Samsung would be in deep doo doo since the Chinese would squeeze them at the  bottom under $350 market and Apple would squeeze them like an anaconda in the middle and upper end. I can imagine a lot of S4 owners trading them in if Apple had a phone with a display around 4.8"

 

Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. 

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Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. 

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post #220 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

But then Steve was also wrong about not wanting to make iPods and iTunes compatible with Windows.

I have never seen any indication of quote ever that Steve Jobs did not want iTunes and the iPod available on Windows. In Fact, he always wanted a cross platform tool chain but public release was killed.
post #221 of 266

This thread has been an interesting read, much popcorn was consumed. I love how the Android Paladins must ride in to defend their church, and make right every (perceived) wrong. I wonder why they care so much what Apple fanbois, deeply immersed in the kool-aid and irradiated by the RDF, say about it?

 

As for the article itself, it's a shame that it goes over the top and is clumsy in expressing some analogies/similies, however it makes some good points. A good editor would do wonders for DED's articles.

"We're Apple. We don't wear suits. We don't even own suits."
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"We're Apple. We don't wear suits. We don't even own suits."
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post #222 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyboyrls View Post

Good tongue in cheek article. Previous explanation for those that didn't see the humor!

"Android" phones are everywhere, but most of them have never seen an OS update, and NEVER will!

Not necessarily bad thing. Being and iPhone 3Gs user - while it sits good in marketing material that my phone can (and do) run iOS 6.x, in reality most new features are disabled on 3Gs, and I did lose some swiftness and, arguably, my battery does last a bit shorter (though this could be just a natural battery ageing).

If I could, I would revert back to iOS5 or even 4 - I recall that was silky smooth in every common scenario, while iOS6 can and will occasionally stutter even on basic tasks that were working fine before - like showing keyboard to reply to txt message or email, for example. It does not happen too often, but happen it does.

I'd revert back to older iOS if that could be easily done, but as it is, it is not worth the effort. It is not that my phone is unusable as it is, it is just that it did work, subjectively, a bit better before. Maybe Apple should have released additional tune-up to iOS 5.x (or even stick with 4.x?) for 3Gs rather than putting an effort to make iOS 6 work of it.
post #223 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post

Not necessarily bad thing. Being and iPhone 3Gs user - while it sits good in marketing material that my phone can (and do) run iOS 6.x, in reality most new features are disabled on 3Gs, and I did lose some swiftness and, arguably, my battery does last a bit shorter (though this could be just a natural battery ageing).

If I could, I would revert back to iOS5 or even 4 - I recall that was silky smooth in every common scenario, while iOS6 can and will occasionally stutter even on basic tasks that were working fine before - like showing keyboard to reply to txt message or email, for example. It does not happen too often, but happen it does.

I'd revert back to older iOS if that could be easily done, but as it is, it is not worth the effort. It is not that my phone is unusable as it is, it is just that it did work, subjectively, a bit better before. Maybe Apple should have released additional tune-up to iOS 5.x (or even stick with 4.x?) for 3Gs rather than putting an effort to make iOS 6 work of it.

It could be that your phone is just old, computers slow down over time. The flash memory, for instance, eventually slows.

You might also try restoring your phone and setting it up as a new phone.
post #224 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post

I read it and already knew Apple wasn't doomed. It was a very stupid title though and something like "Why Apple isn't doomed in 2013 or beyond" for example would have been a better choice.  But you know who else isn't doomed? Google and Samsung. They will keep on trucking on just fine. No one is doomed with the exception of the also rans like Sony (smart phone division not whole company), Blackberry, LG (again smart phone division only), HTC, Nokia, and others. I expect the Chinese to fill in the gap for the sub $350 phones and squeeze pretty much everyone out of that space including Samsung. If Apple decides to make a phone and sell it off contract for around $449 and another with one with a large screen then Samsung would be in deep doo doo since the Chinese would squeeze them at the  bottom under $350 market and Apple would squeeze them like an anaconda in the middle and upper end. I can imagine a lot of S4 owners trading them in if Apple had a phone with a display around 4.8"

You are contradicting yourself... the way you've put it, basically everyone else but Apple and Samsung is de facto doomed.

However, Sony seems to be growing well in Europe (third after Samsung and Apple) and home turf, Japan. Their new models are quite decent, much more desirable for me than Samsung, to be honest.

I also think Nokia will bounce back just fine. Not to previous heights, but to stability for sure. This based on their growth since shift to Windows Phone, which is actually faster than iPhone growth in the same time frame, and in much more competitive environment. Yes their numbers are still hardly significant, but momentum seems to be there.
post #225 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post

What Apple could do is create an API that allows third-party apps to "tag" specific types of data (photos, videos, documents, etc) that other Apps can access. It would essentially be a reverse of the "Open In" API.

Like most of the features that Apple supposedly lacks, such an API is available in iOS.

"Uniform Type Identifiers (or UTIs) are strings which uniquely identify abstract types. They can be used to describe a file format or an in-memory data type, but can also be used to describe the type of other sorts of entities, such as directories, volumes, or packages." UTIs were introduced in iOS 3.

Likewise, developers may choose to implement their own keyboard layout making said layout a universal option. That developers have not chosen to do so speaks less of iOS than of users who do not confuse variety with choice.

Furthermore, file management is available on iOS. Indeed, there are dozens, if not hundreds, of file managers that allow a user to download and install a variety of objects on their iPhone. In my opinion, Tagging is the future of file management. Tagging has quickly become my favorite feature of OS X 10.9 Mavericks.


I fail to understand how any rational, reasonable person could conclude that the iPhone isn't years ahead of the competition considering the dozens of features implemented in iOS that Android simply does not offer.
post #226 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post

It could be that your phone is just old, computers slow down over time. The flash memory, for instance, eventually slows.

You might also try restoring your phone and setting it up as a new phone.

I did factory default my phone at some point, but I still get occasional stutter/delay. It does not happen every time, so my phone is not slower in general... but every now and then, when you tap on txt windows to type message, nothing happens for a second or longer before keyboard shows on screen.

My lucky guess is that iOS 6 simple has bigger footprint than older iOSes, thus leaving less available RAM on old 3Gs to run apps, thus bottlenecking easier than older iOS would. In addition, iOS6 is more complex than iOS3 my phone came with, so extra processing muscle wouldn't hurt either.

There is really nothing wrong with this. I remember my wife's Toshiba Satellite 1000 delivered with 128MB of RAM back in 2001, later upgraded to 512MB. Served her well (enough) with XP. Just for fun, we tried to install Windows 7 on it, and, well... it worked. But not even remotely as smooth as my 3Gs works with iOS6 1wink.gif

So there's that. I'm not complaining re iOS updates, I'm just saying that, while they sound great on paper, they don't necessarily bring real benefits to older devices. Thus if I were Android user, I would not be too unhappy with lack of OS updates - especially if I'm using low cost handset that already runs on the edge of it's potential with whatever OS came with it.
post #227 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post


I fail to understand how any rational, reasonable person could conclude that the iPhone isn't years ahead of the competition considering the dozens of features implemented in iOS that Android simply does not offer.

Can you give us a few examples of these features.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #228 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post


Can you give us a few examples of these features.

 

@Macbook Pro's statement you are referring to is a bit too strong, of course, but his explanation of how functional can sandboxed environment be is accurate and it counters incredibly stupid comments of Fandroids how great and open Android is and how closed iOS is.

 

I can name you one feature that will never ever be implemented on Android even near to how on iOS is, though: security. It takes time, skills and whole lot of services to build functional and useful sandboxed OS. It will never happen on Android, Android is going Windows way.

post #229 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post

Lots of errors in your so called facts and corrections.  The first clones showed up in early 1995 so planning had to have started in 1994. I remember a presentation in mid 1994 showing a prototype Mac Clone so the date is really early to late 1990's so your "late 1990's is actually the date the program was aborted.

 

You could continue on your so called "facts" pointing out the fact you really do not understand or remember the chain of events very well.

 

Th plan date is not the release date. The release date was 1995  which is mid 1990's. What it is not is early 1990's. The licensing program really got going in 1995-1997 and was abandoned only when Steve Jobs came back. 

 

In no sense then, would a program which started in a limited fashion in 1995 and lasted until 1999 or so ( although most clones were curtailed in 1997/98) be called early 1990's. Early 1990's is wrong. I should probably have said, mid-to-late 1990's but guess what: I am commenting below the line not above it.

 

The stats above the line need to be fact checked more rigorously than those below it. So go take that forensic abilities of yours and apply it to DED's original comments.

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post #230 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post


Like most of the features that Apple supposedly lacks, such an API is available in iOS.

"Uniform Type Identifiers (or UTIs) are strings which uniquely identify abstract types. They can be used to describe a file format or an in-memory data type, but can also be used to describe the type of other sorts of entities, such as directories, volumes, or packages." UTIs were introduced in iOS 3.

Likewise, developers may choose to implement their own keyboard layout making said layout a universal option. That developers have not chosen to do so speaks less of iOS than of users who do not confuse variety with choice.

Furthermore, file management is available on iOS. Indeed, there are dozens, if not hundreds, of file managers that allow a user to download and install a variety of objects on their iPhone. In my opinion, Tagging is the future of file management. Tagging has quickly become my favorite feature of OS X 10.9 Mavericks.


I fail to understand how any rational, reasonable person could conclude that the iPhone isn't years ahead of the competition considering the dozens of features implemented in iOS that Android simply does not offer.

 

I can't see tagging ever getting to iOS 7, though i would like it.

 

Interesting how small improvements make such differences. Tags are basically labels, and have been around for years. In Mavericks they have a decent UI - you can change the label/tag on save - and suddenly they are brilliant.  ( no sarcasm, they are).

I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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post #231 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Nope.  Translucency is one of the easiest graphics transformations and does not require much power.

 

(We were doing it years ago on lowly 200 MHz Windows Mobile smartphones.)

 

Is that when HTC couldn't even get the graphics drivers to work?

 

Back when they were called Dopod's iMates, O2's or any of the other brands HTC was acting as an OEM for?

 

Provide a link, as your roes coloured glasses seem to be tainted with crap.

Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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post #232 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by poksi View Post

 

@Macbook Pro's statement you are referring to is a bit too strong, of course, but his explanation of how functional can sandboxed environment be is accurate and it counters incredibly stupid comments of Fandroids how great and open Android is and how closed iOS is.

 

I can name you one feature that will never ever be implemented on Android even near to how on iOS is, though: security. It takes time, skills and whole lot of services to build functional and useful sandboxed OS. It will never happen on Android, Android is going Windows way.

 

Okay fair enough, I've never had a problem with security or malware but I'm sure users who don't know what their installing have. I put a lot of blame on Google for this, their should be a much larger scrutiny when allowing apps into Google Play. I no longer buy Android or iOS phones for personal use as I like supporting platforms with low market penetration. I have recently put in a preorder for a Jolla phone and I will also probably buy a Nokia Lumia EOS with the 40 MP camera when it's finally released. Work phone wise, well I really didn't have a choice there, as they are issued to me by my firm. This time around they gave me a BB Z10, no complaints though as it does everything I need a phone to do and I really dig the interface. It also has a great file-manager app that can access my work servers via VPN, which is probably the only criteria I have in a work phone.

 

As you might have guessed I love owning phones that are very unique, if I see to many of the same phone on the street chances are I will never buy one, MeegOS was one of my favorite mobile OS's of all time so the new Jolla phone is probably a good match for me.

When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #233 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Is that when HTC couldn't even get the graphics drivers to work?

Back when they were called Dopod's iMates, O2's or any of the other brands HTC was acting as an OEM for?

Provide a link, as your roes coloured glasses seem to be tainted with crap.

Any particular reason you couldn't ask politely for a citation, or offer a counterargument without going "angry guy"? There's a handful of members who seem to always be looking for a fight instead of a discussion. We can change the tone here if enough of us choose to make an effort at it.
melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #234 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by gkelly View Post

This article does not hold up to the level of quality and professionalism I have come to expect from Apple Insider. Very silly and crude.

 

It's a Dilger "article." This is what you should expect from him (i.e., neither quality nor professionalism).

post #235 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Any particular reason you couldn't ask politely for a citation, or offer a counterargument without going "angry guy"? There's a handful of members who seem to always be looking for a fight instead of a discussion. We can change the tone here if enough of us choose to make an effort at it.

Noooo, go to hell! 1tongue.gif
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #236 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

I think that the definition of "enough money" is relative.  

Apple went into the phone market only expecting to get a relatively small percentage, and yet that was "enough money" for them at the time.


Now when we're talking about markets with billions of potential buyers, even a smaller profit per device can become "enough"   1wink.gif



I dunno.  At this stage of iPhone existence, customers shouldn't have to use an unpolished version for a year or two while a new UI designer gains experience.  The smartest thing to do would be to wait to deploy it until it's more polished.  Apple already got one black eye with their maps going out a bit too soon.  That should be a wakeup call to not rush something out.



Good point.  It is nice to see things put in that people have asked for (and jailbroken to get) for years now.

As for "copying", most consumers don't care one whit about who came first, so I don't think F and I worry about it either.
Oh I agree that they shouldn't rush something out. And I hope they don't (or are able to polish it up enough by sept/oct). My point is with the amount of time they had to do this re-design I don't think we'll fully get where they're going until iOS 8 or 9. Ive said this was just the beginning. Manton Reece, who used to work with Scott Forstall at Apple has a podcast called Core Intuition. He's actually been quite positive about iOS 7 (while agreeing its far from finished). What he's said now on several podcasts is how amazed he is at what Federighi, Ive & Co. were able to accomplish in just 6-8 months.

Sure I don't think anyone at Apple cares whether they're accused of copying or not. But I get annoyed with those who rip on iOS 7 (even though its still in beta) and say Scott Forstall needs to be brought back. There's features we're getting in iOS 7 that we should have gotten under Forstall and we never did. I think iOS was stagnating under him. Either he was out of new ideas or he was coasting on its success. I read through some of Forstall's videotape deposition from the Samsung trial and you get this sense of arrogance and that Forstall really hated Android and felt it was a complete ripoff of iOS. I wonder if perhaps he was so blinded by that hatred he didn't realize Android was passing iOS by in some respects.
post #237 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by sennen View Post

A good editor would do wonders for DED's articles.

 

A good editor wouldn't publish Dilger's trash "articles." They're not news articles. They're ego-stroking for Apple fans.

 

He really has only ever written one story: Apple is awesome! Microsoft/Google/(Insert Latest Company to Compete Against Apple Here) sux!!!!

post #238 of 266
Of course Apple can survive. I've spoken to a number of iOS users, and all of them carefully explained that they didn't want a neatly laid-out UI with thin fonts and flat style. They were perfectly happy with the way iOS 6 looked. I couldn't understand it. Now Apple has unveiled iOS 7, and the same people are excited about the new look. They won't be able to go back to the old look, but they don't mind. I don't understand that either. So you see, that's two things I have failed to understand, while Apple are so on the pulse that they know exactly when to make the change, and with pleasure and great applause. I can only look on and gape.
post #239 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by poglad View Post

Of course Apple can survive. I've spoken to a number of iOS users, and all of them carefully explained that they didn't want a neatly laid-out UI with thin fonts and flat style. They were perfectly happy with the way iOS 6 looked. I couldn't understand it. Now Apple has unveiled iOS 7, and the same people are excited about the new look. They won't be able to go back to the old look, but they don't mind. I don't understand that either. So you see, that's two things I have failed to understand, while Apple are so on the pulse that they know exactly when to make the change, and with pleasure and great applause. I can only look on and gape.

Obviously people are going to be happy with what they have. IF they have a good enough car from Ford, for instance. But things move on, and if Ford - in the same price range - produces a better looking car then they would equally, or preferably, like that. 

 

Thats the problem with consumer surveys.

I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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post #240 of 266

I think the article points to something I've never considered:  most of these cheap Android phones are used as little more than feature phones.  I would love to know how they determined that.  I am sure there are less people that use the iPhone as a feature phone, but I am equally sure there are people that do.  It really just depends on the criteria.  

 

Since you could surf the web and and play sad little games on a feature phone, at what point are you using a smartphone as a smartphone?

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