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NPD: Apple's MacBook Air most popular thin-and-light notebook with 56 percent share of market

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
Apple's MacBook Air is far and away the most popular notebook in its class, according to new data from NPD that shows the ultra portable holding more than half of the thin-and-light laptop market.

air


Market research firm NPD estimates that Apple's MacBook Air grabbed 56 percent of the U.S. thin-and-light notebook market in the first five months of 2013, according to CNet. The remainder of the market was split between assorted Ultrabook manufacturers.

NPD's figures don't yet take into account the release of Apple's newest MacBook Airs, which leverage Intel's new Haswell processors. The 2013 models were designed to maximize battery life, with an advertised 12 hours of juice in the case of the 13-inch model.

AppleInsider found the 11-inch MacBook Air to not only live up to Apple's claims, but surpass them by some measure.

Already a leader in the mobile computing sector, Apple has also been able to somewhat buck the trend that has seen the traditional computing segment in steep decline. One report from earlier this year estimated that Apple's Mac line generates more profit than the other top five PC makers combined.
post #2 of 30
Why would you buy any other ultra portable?
post #3 of 30
Doomed
Doodle Dice iPhone puzzle game: A fun, free physics-laden collection of dice games.  Greatest app made yet?  Perhaps young man... Perhaps.
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Doodle Dice iPhone puzzle game: A fun, free physics-laden collection of dice games.  Greatest app made yet?  Perhaps young man... Perhaps.
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post #4 of 30
But...but...but... iHaters and trolls say that the MBA is just generic PC parts in a "pretty" package? How can this be??

Oh wait... for a moment I thought they actually had a valid opinion... nevermind. My bad.

*posted using my 2011 MBA, the best notebook I've ever used.
post #5 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple's MacBook Air is far and away the most popular notebook in its class, according to new data from NPD that shows the ultra portable holding more than half of the thin-and-light laptop market.

 


Market research firm NPD estimates that Apple's MacBook Air grabbed 56 percent of the U.S. thin-and-light notebook market in the first five months of 2013, according to CNet. The remainder of the market was split between assorted Ultrabook manufacturers.

NPD's figures don't yet take into account the release of Apple's newest MacBook Airs, which leverage Intel's new Haswell processors. The 2013 models were designed to maximize battery life, with an advertised 12 hours of juice in the case of the 13-inch model.

AppleInsider found the 11-inch MacBook Air to not only live up to Apple's claims, but surpass them by some measure.

Already a leader in the mobile computing sector, Apple has also been able to somewhat buck the trend that has seen the traditional computing segment in steep decline. One report from earlier this year estimated that Apple's Mac line generates more profit than the other top five PC makers combined.

 

Uncle Fester just completed his big Whoop-de-doo conference and didn't even mention Haswell chips for the Surface Pro bun warmer. So, how far out can THAT be? 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple's MacBook Air is far and away the most popular notebook in its class, according to new data from NPD that shows the ultra portable holding more than half of the thin-and-light laptop market.

Already a leader in the mobile computing sector, Apple has also been able to somewhat buck the trend that has seen the traditional computing segment in steep decline. One report from earlier this year estimated that Apple's Mac line generates more profit than the other top five PC makers combined.
 

THAT'S AMAZING !! It shows how terrible it is to have an OS that anyone can slap on a box of chips. There's just no way to make a decent profit. The same thing is going on in the Android phone and tablet market. Hardly a penny's profit for all the units sold. Even Samsung is losing money; 10s of billions dollars loss just announced.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #6 of 30

It's just like with other categories of Apple devices that serves as the inspiration for every other cheap, ripoff on the market.

 

There is the one true original, in this case the Macbook Air, then there are all of the other inferior, crappy Macbook Air wannabes.

 

The funniest part is that the people who constantly bash and whine about Apple are probably the very same people that go out and buy these inferior products that try so hard to look like a Macbook Air. What a bunch of pathetic fools.

post #7 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

It's just like with other categories of Apple devices that serves as the inspiration for every other cheap, ripoff on the market.

 

There is the one true original, in this case the Macbook Air, then there are all of the other inferior, crappy Macbook Air wannabes.

 

The funniest part is that the people who constantly bash and whine about Apple are probably the very same people that go out and buy these inferior products that try so hard to look like a Macbook Air. What a bunch of pathetic fools.

A bit harsh....but I agree with you. :)

post #8 of 30
Remember, Ultrabook = MacbookAir clone.

Clones are by definition/practice, inferior to the original.
post #9 of 30
I've been pleasantly surprised by the price comparison of the new MBA to the Wintel ultrabooks.
post #10 of 30
I have the late 2010 MBA and it is still rocking!
post #11 of 30
Yep and copies of a copy are even less sharp
post #12 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

It's just like with other categories of Apple devices that serves as the inspiration for every other cheap, ripoff on the market.

 

There is the one true original, in this case the Macbook Air, then there are all of the other inferior, crappy Macbook Air wannabes.

 

The funniest part is that the people who constantly bash and whine about Apple are probably the very same people that go out and buy these inferior products that try so hard to look like a Macbook Air. What a bunch of pathetic fools.

 

Not all the ultrabooks are facsimiles of the MBA. But some are shockingly shameless in their copying, including HP. I'd argue they go farther in copying the MBA than Samsung has done with the Galaxy phones. But perhaps because the software is different, the argument for brand confusion is weaker.
Although I have tried far from all Windows ultrabooks, the ones I have used are surprisingly inferior in one respect - the touchpad. Pardon the pun, they can't touch Apple yet on that front.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

I've been pleasantly surprised by the price comparison of the new MBA to the Wintel ultrabooks.

Same here. The drop in price after adding Haswell was indeed a pleasant surprise. I think Apple recognizes that this form factor may become the dominant one amongst laptops, and is moving aggressively to lock it up.

post #13 of 30
Tough choice this fall, MacBook Air
or 5th generation iPad 4g 128g (maybe 256g?) I got good problems 1smile.gif
post #14 of 30
But the Air doesn't have touch screen or high res display. How can it be winning? /s
post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Uncle Fester just completed his big Whoop-de-doo conference and didn't even mention Haswell chips for the Surface Pro bun warmer. So, how far out can THAT be? 

Well, at least he said "Surface" once. RT did not score that well.

(And the Haswell Surface seems to be far out. At least they just announced a 256 GB variant of the old, non Haswell model today - for a paltry $1200.)
post #16 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

But the Air doesn't have touch screen or high res display. How can it be winning? /s

But but but Samsung has a retina display in a notebook as light as the MacBook Air. Apple clearly can't compete any more. /s

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #17 of 30

Someone at the cafe was using an MBA tonight.  It's just so beautiful, aesthetically.  I wish I could justify getting one.

post #18 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by r00fus View Post

Clones are by definition/practice, inferior to the original.

post #19 of 30

Deservedly so!

 

I consider myself a pretty open minded tech connoisseur, and yet I can't imagine buying any other think-and-light laptop over the MacBook Air. The only think I can think of reasonably improving on it is a better screen (which is honestly the worst screen Apple sells), and maybe a thinner bezel (would love a 14.x" MacBook Air in the same form factor - but that's a stretch, I know).

 

But anyway, 12 hours of battery! That's worth any minor faults.

 

The only PC companies that come close to Apple these days are Sony - which is going through a bit of a Rennaisance, I think, and would be out Apple-ing Apple if they could be shipping OS X machines - and Lenovo, which maddeningly couples the best damn keyboards (better than Apple, I dare say) with the worst screens imaginable.

post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

A bit harsh....but I agree with you. :)

Yeah. Too harsh.. but I agree with him.

post #21 of 30

Occasionally of late and especially since I've acquired an rMBP, when down at the local mall I would pop into one of the 'hi fi' chains and peruse their array of laptops in a spirit of morbid fascination that people actually purchase this garbage. Bendy plastic cases, horrid tactilely challenge trackpads, screens that look like first generation lcd displays from yesteryear... I postulate to myself that anyone who would willingly purchase this pile of steaming doggy doo, deserves it.

post #22 of 30
The MB Air is the only "ultra" that makes any sense to me. It's my next computer purchase, later this month%u2026 13", stock 256GB version. The new models really take it into perfect price/performance territory. Looking forward to it!
post #23 of 30

The Air is a great product, and it competes on price, which Apple does do when it has a chance of winning.

I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ifij775 View Post

I've been pleasantly surprised by the price comparison of the new MBA to the Wintel ultrabooks.

Not to mention a MBA is in fact multiple computers in one (as is any other modern Mac) as it can run almost any operating system in VMware as well as its own. Anyone buying any other make of computer is nuts. I have an external drive with a dozen VMs and can fire up anything from Windows 8.1 to OS X 10.9 Server in seconds. By the way, the server works great on one core in a VM with virtually no impact on the mother OS even when serving up HD video on a web site accessed via the internet using real domain name/DNS (i.e. not just .local).

As to Windows, the great thing about running Windows this way is the ability to make a back up of the initial installation in seconds and have it there when Windows does its inevitable slow down. No mess no fuss, ditch it and fire up a fresh version in seconds. Try that on a crappy Wintel PC. Apple hardware totally rocks!
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #25 of 30

None of the AI or CNET links actually go to the NPD report, and it doesn't seem to be available at NPD.com

 

Tough to see what the criteria was for "thin and light" notebook would be, also whether hybrid tablet/notebooks would be included in the study.

 

Really, how you define "thin and light" would make a big difference. If the max thickness/weight was set at the MBA's specs, for example, there wouldn't be much competition, since there aren't really more than a couple competing products. Add a centimeter and half a kilo and there are all of a sudden a lot more products that might make the study. Add "2-in-1s" and again, the numbers change.

 

Random numbers with no methodology/description of product group backing them up are pretty random...

post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superbass View Post

None of the AI or CNET links actually go to the NPD report, and it doesn't seem to be available at NPD.com

Tough to see what the criteria was for "thin and light" notebook would be, also whether hybrid tablet/notebooks would be included in the study.

Really, how you define "thin and light" would make a big difference. If the max thickness/weight was set at the MBA's specs, for example, there wouldn't be much competition, since there aren't really more than a couple competing products. Add a centimeter and half a kilo and there are all of a sudden a lot more products that might make the study. Add "2-in-1s" and again, the numbers change.

Random numbers with no methodology/description of product group backing them up are pretty random...

Pretty sure it's comparing them to the so-called "Ultrabooks".
post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


Not to mention a MBA is in fact multiple computers in one (as is any other modern Mac) as it can run almost any operating system in VMware as well as its own. Anyone buying any other make of computer is nuts. I have an external drive with a dozen VMs and can fire up anything from Windows 8.1 to OS X 10.9 Server in seconds. By the way, the server works great on one core in a VM with virtually no impact on the mother OS even when serving up HD video on a web site accessed via the internet using real domain name/DNS (i.e. not just .local).

 

See, this is a great point that often gets overlooked in reviews or in the tech "press".  I don't have an MBA, but on my iMac (or my MacBook, for that matter) I can run OSX, Windows, Linux, whatever.  And it's easy-peasy.  This seems to me like a big advantage.

post #28 of 30
I need speed. I like to game, and I do graphics and 3D work.

I need a big screen, for the graphics work and for programming.

I need to travel but not often.

And I STILL choose a MacBook Air every time. The one-hand grab-and-go convenience (even just across the house) is so nice that I took a week to get used to the loss of my iMac's speed and screen, and never looked back. Great battery life, and I accept the need to crank the detail down on games.

I did, however, switch from a 13" to an 11".

P.S. Have you ever picked up one of those cheap MacBook Air clones? Despite the poor battery life (and often lack of lighted keys) they are as heavy as a brick. And are made of cheap, crackable painted plastic instead of real metal! It's pretty horrifying after using a real Air. (Which is also cheaper in the end: longer usable life means buying fewer of them, and each one holds great resale value. To say nothing of lower support costs.)
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Market research firm NPD estimates that Apple's MacBook Air grabbed 56 percent of the U.S. thin-and-light notebook market in the first five months of 2013, according to CNet. The remainder of the market was split between assorted Ultrabook manufacturers.

 

If you narrow it down to just the "thin-and-light" notebook market, then obviously the MacBook Air is going to be one of the top. I'm more interested in knowing how it  sits in the entire laptop market.

post #30 of 30
Sounds like apple is hitting it out of the park on multiple fronts. My company has already approved the purchase of the new Mac Pro when it comes out in a few months.
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