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Samsung's "free" Jay Z album delivered via Android spyware app - Page 2

post #41 of 82

If this was Apple it would be the #1 story on CNN's Tech website and all over... but oh, Samsung - ehhh... the mass-media doesn't care.

post #42 of 82
It's like pirate bay without benefits
post #43 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple v. Samsung View Post

So a popup saying what the app has permission to access your gps does not count as a request for your permission. If you have to choose to accept

In Android:

It is not asking permission to access GPS, it's just telling you that it will access GPS. Your agreement is not needed.

 

In iOS:

The application will ask GPS access, in which you can give or deny the access. Even if you agreed in the first place, you can deny its access later from privacy setting.

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post #44 of 82
Code:
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3Eleven View Post

How is it "sneaky" when it clearly says what the app wants access to? Unless you're illiterate it's pretty straight forward.

It doesn't say what it WANTS to access it says what it MAY access and once you install it then you will never know or be asked for specific permission. Essentially it is holding stupid and lazy people hostage ie if you want "free" "music" then press this button and don't worry about it
post #45 of 82

Funny how it's everywhere on torrents literally within an hour after it was available. That's what you get for trusting your music to Android users. :)

 

It will be interesting to see how it does on iTunes when it releases soon. If iTunes racks up record sales then it will be a PR disaster for Samsung/Google/JayZ to see the competition being responsible for making you the most money. In fact, given how little Google Play sells vs iTunes (1/6th) it's guaranteed iTunes sales of this album will dwarf Google Play sales.

 

Even funnier would be if online digital sales tanked because of all the people who were able to get it free by torrenting it.

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post #46 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

iOS is an app platform, not an ad platform.

i didn't even pay attention at first to who wrote the article. when i read this line, i thought "ded". went back to have a look, and sure enough ...

what a tremendous surprise.
post #47 of 82

iOS is an app platform, not an ad platform.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooch View Post


i didn't even pay attention at first to who wrote the article. when i read this line, i thought "ded". went back to have a look, and sure enough ...

what a tremendous surprise.

so what? it's true.

post #48 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

If you're not paying for it; you're the product.

 

Remember Sony... Even if you did pay for it, you were rooted.

post #49 of 82
Is every other article on Apple Insider about Samsung these days?
post #50 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooch View Post


i didn't even pay attention at first to who wrote the article. when i read this line, i thought "ded". went back to have a look, and sure enough ...

what a tremendous surprise.

I just look at the structure... The words mean a bit, but the paragraphs, the section headings, and how it begins and ends are dead giveaways for the DED meter.   DED/PrinceMcLean have a certain iambus in story and structure... 

post #51 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by t0ny View Post

Is every other article on Apple Insider about Samsung these days?

Used to be Microsoft.... then Adobe, then RIMM, then Nokia, then Google... now Samsung...   To be blunt, tech writers like protagonists/antagonists...  otherwise they end up just writing advertising copy.  This way, there are winners and losers, the victorious and the vanquished, women beating their breasts, men performing seppuku, children parentless in the streets in the wake of warring factions churning over the tech landscape.

post #52 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by mesomorphicman View Post

If this was Apple it would be the #1 story on CNN's Tech website and all over... but oh, Samsung - ehhh... the mass-media doesn't care.

CNN has low viewership among samsung stockholders/product owners, especially in the offices in Atlanta.

post #53 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Funny how it's everywhere on torrents literally within an hour after it was available. That's what you get for trusting your music to Android users. :)

 

It will be interesting to see how it does on iTunes when it releases soon. If iTunes racks up record sales then it will be a PR disaster for Samsung/Google/JayZ to see the competition being responsible for making you the most money. In fact, given how little Google Play sells vs iTunes (1/6th) it's guaranteed iTunes sales of this album will dwarf Google Play sales.

 

Even funnier would be if online digital sales tanked because of all the people who were able to get it free by torrenting it.

 

Of course, this is an app, whereas on iTunes it's non-DRM music track.  So it's almost just a teaser. I'm sure anyone who actually likes this album (I take it there'll be a lot of em), could buy it.

 

Yeah, all of the above about pirate sites are exactly why credit card companies (Visa, MC) are denying payments to VPN providers.  The establishment not only wants you to want the music, but to prevent you from trying before buying.

post #54 of 82
post #55 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogJack View Post

It doesn't say what it WANTS to access it says what it MAY access and once you install it then you will never know or be asked for specific permission.

You're absolutely right:  If after being presented with the permissions the app is requesting and you decide to install it, you have the freedom to never again look at the app's settings to see that same list presented there.

 

As a side note, ever notice that OS X doesn't provide a list of app permissions at all?

post #56 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

and no, Apple does nothing like this. your apps still work even when you decline granting any location or other permissions. how lame.

 

So how do you limit the data to which Siri has access (contacts, etc.) without totally disabling Siri?

post #57 of 82
I understand Daniel's point of view here, because the Android permissions screen is a lot like the license agreements you're supposed to read before installing software. That means it's easily ignored. Apple's system of asking permission the first time the GPS is used is a lot more clear in telling people what's going on.

Imagine the difference between the permissions screen you see above and:

"This app wants to access your phone call records. [ OK ] [ Cancel ] "

Most people won't notice that permission in the screen above but will hit "Cancel" for the prompt.

By the way, I don't think Apple offers any kind of permission letting apps use phone call records. At all.

D
post #58 of 82

I picked 3 apps at random and took a screenshot of the full permission screens that are presented before installing.  These are nothing like an EULA that you're presented when installing a program on a desktop computer.

 

 

 

post #59 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Dennis View Post

Apple's system of asking permission the first time the GPS is used is a lot more clear in telling people what's going on.
 

And Apple's iOS Terms and Conditions screen is so short, simple, clear, and easy to understand that people typically read it very thoroughly and completely before they accept the terms.

post #60 of 82

Well sure, how do you know if you agree to something if you don't read it?

 

 

By clicking agree you are also acknowledging that Apple may sew your mouth to the butthole of another iTunes user.  Apple and its subsidiaries may also, if necessary, sew yet another person's mouth onto your butthole making you a being that shares one gastral tract.

Hmm, I'm gonna click on decline.

post #61 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

You're absolutely right:  If after being presented with the permissions the app is requesting and you decide to install it, you have the freedom to never again look at the app's settings to see that same list presented there.

As a side note, ever notice that OS X doesn't provide a list of app permissions at all?
Yeah I get why locations are not included but contacts and stuff aren't there, I'm sure it's not much harder to find than androids however!
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

I picked 3 apps at random and took a screenshot of the full permission screens that are presented before installing.  These are nothing like an EULA that you're presented when installing a program on a desktop computer.








Notice there mostly same and have obvious things on the lists.

What other thing is this Samsung app good for?
If nothing; Apple and probably Samsung have better ways of doing this.

A hacker would probably enjoy getting info off them from apps like this, imagine!
post #62 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3Eleven View Post

How is it "sneaky" when it clearly says what the app wants access to? Unless you're illiterate it's pretty straight forward.

Edited by nikilok - 7/5/13 at 9:15pm
post #63 of 82
The problem about mentioning a long story of what the app will require access to before installation in the EULA style ends up in most users just briskly scrolling and continuing.

Hence although the app throws some technical jargons which I doubt most users would even have the patience to read in the first place , it's not effective a way of doing.

With iOS there is no such hassles because your prompted with a one line were the user hits accept to reject. It's that easy and makes more sense to the user.

It looks like Android is an OS made for the hacker / techie community that will actually sit and read each line of permission and figure out from that what the app could do. Lame !
post #64 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikilok View Post

The problem about mentioning a long story of what the app will require access to before installation in the EULA style ends up in most users just briskly scrolling and continuing.

Hence although the app throws some technical jargons which I doubt most users would even have the patience to read in the first place , it's not effective a way of doing.

With iOS there is no such hassles because your prompted with a one line were the user hits accept to reject. It's that easy and makes more sense to the user.

It looks like Android is an OS made for the hacker / techie community that will actually sit and read each line of permission and figure out from that what the app could do. Lame !

Yeah, Android should make it easier. I used an app once that would notify me whenever an app requested to access certain permission. But what would end up happening was it notified me for every decision I made. It was just annoying.

 

I think a good implementation would be somewhere in between what XPrivacy does and what iOS does.

post #65 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

. . .The open source community used to care before Google came in and dictated that open source was now going to be all about harvesting the "community" for ads. . . .

This is an important observation, especially stated this way. Google/Android has not only perverted the meaning of "open," they've shamelessly co-opted what was an intentional, somewhat utopian-minded community. Yes, they may have been too easily fooled, and their Apple-phobia too easily exploited, but still, the hypocrisy of the exploiter reeks.
post #66 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

This is actually very scary....and B) people are continually willing to give privet information away.
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post #67 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrrodriguez View Post


So you don't want any apps to use your Location data at all? You may not use Map but people use it.
post #68 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

I picked 3 apps at random and took a screenshot of the full permission screens that are presented before installing.  These are nothing like an EULA that you're presented when installing a program on a desktop computer.









WTH? If I have to live with THOSE everyday. You bunches are very tolerant. LOL.
post #69 of 82

This is just getting better and better.

 

Master Key’ Gives Bad Guys Access to Almost Any Android Phone.

post #70 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

 

So where's the "Decline" button?

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post #71 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by PScooter63 View Post

So where's the "Decline" button?

 

Just root your device to decline. It solves everything.

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post #72 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by runbuh View Post

So how do you limit the data to which Siri has access (contacts, etc.) without totally disabling Siri?

 

When it was a third party app (before Apple acquired SRI) it was limited in the same way as all other third party apps. When it was integrated into the operating system, it received the same privileges as any other part of the OS.

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post #73 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by runbuh View Post

So how do you limit the data to which Siri has access (contacts, etc.) without totally disabling Siri?

Ummm, because Siri is part of the phone perhaps? That would be like requiring the headphone jack to ask permission to access your music.
post #74 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by matrix07 View Post

This is just getting better and better.

 

Master Key’ Gives Bad Guys Access to Almost Any Android Phone.

There's already a post about this on the site.

post #75 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by runbuh View Post

 

So how do you limit the data to which Siri has access (contacts, etc.) without totally disabling Siri?

Siri isn't an app. it's part of the OS/UI. you might as well ask to disable the touch screen's "access" to contacts, websites, etc. of course then the phone would be unusable.

post #76 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by PScooter63 View Post

 

So where's the "Decline" button?

Probably the "back" button, although the dialog box ought to make this clearer.

post #77 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post

Probably the "back" button, although the dialog box ought to make this clearer.

Correct. Pressing the back button gets you out of it. Pressing the back button to get out of something is a common thing in Android.
post #78 of 82
Great!! Three things I have no interest in.

Samsung, Jay-Z and Android.

I wish AI would just not post Android crap on AI.
post #79 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

Siri isn't an app. it's part of the OS/UI. you might as well ask to disable the touch screen's "access" to contacts, websites, etc. of course then the phone would be unusable.


But the touchscreen doesn't send all my "User Data" to Apple, its subsidiaries, and its "agents", like Siri does.  Also, the fact that Siri is doing so is buried deep in the Apple SLA (a 10 page document) that you only see on the phone when you are initially setting up the phone.  Siri is disabled on my iPhone, just like all the similar crap apps from Google and Samsung are disabled on my S4.


Edited by runbuh - 7/6/13 at 7:26pm
post #80 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by runbuh View Post


But the touchscreen doesn't send all my "User Data" to Apple, its subsidiaries, and its "agents", like Siri does.  Also, the fact that Siri is doing so is buried deep in the Apple SLA (a 10 page document) that you only see on the phone when you are initially setting up the phone.  Siri is disabled on my iPhone, just like all the similar crap apps from Google and Samsung are disabled on my S4.

yes, the Siri AI is actually running on Apple servers if you want to use that service of it. but Apple is not data mining that info like Google does. it's not compiling and profiling you into a whole data base "all about you" from it and other Apple apps to sell ads/services like Google does - you're anonymous on that side of the connection. and don't pretend there is an equivalency of some kind. there just isn't.

 

and if you still don't like the limited things it does, as you note you can turn it off. try turning off Android's personally identified data collection. you wind up with a brick.

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