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Editorial: Apple, Google and the failure of Android's open

post #1 of 310
Thread Starter 
Open Source enthusiasts love to tell you Android is winning, and that it is winning because it is open. But they're wrong on both counts. The history of computing makes that abundantly clear, as do the current leaders in profitability.



Asymco


Apple's growing cash, cash equivalents, and securities, via Asymco.



The undelivered promise of open



The ideological allure of "open" is very strong. Really, who doesn't want technology to scramble ahead as quickly as possible, unfettered by the proprietary barriers erected by companies trying to make money? Except, of course, said companies trying to make money.

Years ago, I regularly argued that Microsoft's Windows monopoly would increasingly be encroached upon in two directions: from Apple on the high end, and from Linux on the low end.

I was only half right. Apple brought down WinTel nearly on its own, while Linux on the PC never managed to materialize as a significant threat to Windows on the desktop. Even Google's recent resuscitation of Linux as Chrome OS has had nearly zero impact on the world.

Today, Apple's iOS is, in a sense, the Windows of mobile computing. iOS is the platform developers are targeting, with other mobile platforms getting only the scraps of attention that are left over. Once again, we have a dramatic battle where the "Open Source" role of Linux is now being played by Google's Android.

And while Android's advocates would very much like it to be winning, the reality is that overall, products based on Android are not making money and not creating a solid platform because software developers are not making lots of money on it either. Most Android licensees are actively losing money.

In large part, this is because "free" attracts lower value customers who don't want to pay for apps, services or hardware and who block ads. This population has helped ensure that both Android and the open web aren't very good at generating revenue. Across the entire web and Android, Google generates much less revenue than Apple does just selling the iPhone to roughly 22 percent of smartphone owners.

In total, Google earned just over $50 billion in all of 2012, including its Motorola hardware group. In contrast, Apple earned more than $54 billion just in the most recent quarter.


Canalys market share


via Canalys


And while Google is struggling to enter the hardware business with its Nexus and Motorola brands, Apple is already skimming the most profitable cream off the top of the ad business with iAd even as it sits on the most valuable segment of the population that advertisers want to reach with iOS.

Less open, more profitable



The most successful fringes of Android are those that are the least open. Samsung is the world's leading Android licensee, and essentially the only really successful one. But it achieved that success by layering Android with proprietary designs and features and marketing its products identically to Apple.

When Samsung markets its Galaxy S4 and Note 2 flagships, it doesn't advertise that they run the same Android OS as the HTC One and the LG-built Google Nexus 4. It advertises is own proprietary software features like Air Gesture, its S-Pen, its S heath add-ons and its SAFE Knox software, none of which is shared with the Android community.


Galaxy S4


Samsung's Galaxy S4 page makes one mention of Android in tiny type.


Saying that today's Samsung is successful because it is "open" with Android is like saying that today's China is successful because it is Communist. In reality, their recent successes are due to both having stepped away from communal planning and designs and toward proprietary, differentiated, private investment of capital.

Samsung isn't successful because of Android, it's successful in spite of it.

Further, Samsung is working to be less "open" by partnering with Intel to deliver Tizen, the latest effort at launching Linux for mobile phones in a way that is "open" at the core but which can be used to deliver even more proprietary, differentiated products than Google's communal Open Handset Alliance for Android.

"Open" software doesn't necessarily have to be open, just ask Motorola, which once sold Linux phones in China that were in no way open whatsoever. Motorola just used open source software as a way to sell proprietary devices, the same way that Google sells proprietary advertising services using open software, or as Apple sells proprietary hardware that leverages open source software deeply buried at its core.

Open doesn't usually win



How successful Samsung's Tizen can be remains to be seen. It's the fusion of the ashes of previous failed attempts to deliver an open Linux distro for mobile developers. It also has many open predecessors that are not around anymore, including PalmSource ACCESS, OpenMoko, LiMo, LiPS and the closed version of Linux that Motorola used to sell on feature phones in China.

Being open also didn't save Nokia's once leading Symbian. Nokia took control of the Symbian platform and turned it into an open source foundation only to see its efforts stumble off into irrelevance, much the same way that Netscape "opened" its browser code to deliver Mozilla and Firefox, which exist only because third parties have dumped tens of millions of dollars a year down its rathole over the past decade.

Like any other failed communal experiment, the apparent successes dry up and blow away as soon as you stop heavily subsidizing the operation with cash it couldn't otherwise earn on its own.

If you're making a score card of how often "open" has won in the mobile world, it's not performing very well just on its ideological credentials alone. It's certainly not a magical path to success. And historically, being "open" has generally served as a way to transfer one's value to other parties and then go out of business.

Everyone is open when and where they're not making money



Apple's iOS and the OS X it was derived from are built on an open source foundation, albeit if anything, less open than even Samsung's version of Android that's iced with thick, proprietary layers on top.

Some significant portion of Apple's success with MacBooks over the past decade was certainly due to OS X's ability to serve as an excellent version of Unix, a feature that attracted many open source enthusiasts and developers who wanted the familiarity of an open Unix system with the slick integration of a well designed, proprietary product. Open software has historically resulted in a primordial soup from which real winners emerge through proprietary activity.

So rather than "open" being a binary condition that makes companies who claim adherence to it successful at the expense of those who are "closed" and proprietary, the reality is that successful companies can adopt open software in areas that make sense, but they will derive most of their profits from proprietary activity.

And when you look at the world realistically, Google is making its money through proprietary activity in placing ads in front of audiences, just as Apple and Samsung make their money by layering proprietary hardware and software technologies over an increasingly less significant open source core.

Rather than being a key to success (espoused in the mantra, "open always wins"), open software has historically resulted in a primordial soup from which real winners emerge through proprietary activity. Stay in the soup and you don't develop, nor do you make any money.

Evolution out of the FOSS pool



In the earliest days of personal computing, the first platform you could call open is probably CP/M, which was simply a work-alike system that was shared by a lot of personal computers, fostering compatibility between them.

Microsoft's initial claim to fame, in 1981, was to "embrace and extend" CP/M into a proprietary MS-DOS it could make money on by licensing it to PC makers. Microsoft worked hard to prevent alternative versions of DOS from selling, much the same way that today Samsung has little interest in helping out its fellow Android licensees sell hardware.

MS-DOS was widespread when Apple released its Macintosh, which introduced an entirely new way to work that was proprietary to Apple. The Mac was so much better than DOS for some activities that, despite winning minimal market share, it could grab a significant profit share.

However, Microsoft subsequently appropriated much of the proprietary value of the Mac and began selling it to its established DOS licensees as Windows. Apple clearly lost much of its potential sales for Macs because there was an "open" alternative that was available across a number of PC makers.It wasn't "openness" that made PCs more successful than Macs throughout the 90s. It was economies of scale funding proprietary advances.

But Apple didn't lose out in the 1990s because it was "closed instead of open." It lost out because its proprietary value was forcibly cracked open by Microsoft, which then successfully resold Apple's work as a proprietary offering. Calling this a triumph of "open" is like calling burglary a triumph over ownership.

Apple simply couldn't compete against the economies of scale that were feeding the DOS/Windows PC; it at least did a very poor job in trying. The end result was that Apple only retained a relatively small niche business throughout most of the 1990s.

While you can describe WinTel as "open" in comparison to Apple, it wasn't "openness" that made PCs more successful than Macs throughout the 90s. It was economies of scale funding proprietary advances, not openness, that kept Windows PCs profitable and dominant. There were other "more open" platforms that couldn't compete with it either.

Open fails at NeXT, Apple and Palm



The failure of "open" was even more evident outside of the not-very-open WinTel world. In the late 80s, Steve Jobs' NeXT had also attempted to take the value of the Mac, combined with the "openness" and market for Unix workstations, and deploy it as an advanced computing system.

NeXTSTEP


Once the economies of scale favoring PCs became obvious, NeXT switched from an Apple-like hardware model to a Microsoft-like software model. That "openness" didn't help. But even more radically, NeXT then turned to an open specification model, one quite similar to today's Android.

Under this model, NeXT planned to work with HP, Sun and other major workstation vendors to develop OpenStep, a standard windowing environment that anyone could adopt. NeXT would sell its own software as an implementation of the specification, and developers could build apps that would work anywhere, even on top of Windows running an OpenStep shell.

OpenStep largely failed because Sun pulled out of the partnership and copied the most valuable concepts of the OpenStep specification to deliver Java, a write-once, deploy anywhere strategy with lower barriers of adoption.

Despite giving the world an advanced and very open computing environment, Jobs' OpenStep didn't go anywhere. NeXT eventually was acquired by Apple and became the foundation of OS X, giving the aging Macintosh a new lease on life. Jobs, and Apple, learned some additional, powerful lessons about the nature of being "open."

Prior to Jobs' return, Apple had also learned some of its own lessons regarding open platforms. In the early 90s, Apple launched Newton Message Pad handheld tablets but also licensed its Newton OS mobile technology to other companies, including Motorola and Sharp, in a program similar to today's Android.

Newton Message Pad


Apple then attempted to also license its Mac OS to Panasonic, Bandai and other hardware makers for use in both computers and game consoles, all without much success.

Palm, which in the late 90s had delivered a smaller, simpler and cheaper alternative to Newton for PDAs and later smartphones, also tried to license its Palm OS to Sony and other licensees much like Android, before also running into the same issues of stagnancy, fragmentation and competitive issues that Android is now facing.

The open failure of Linux



NeXT's Android-like OpenStep isn't the only ambitious effort to openly offer sophisticated technology that has failed. Failure occurs more often than not. "Openness" also doesn't help avoid failure.

In the first half of the 1990s, Novell's Ray Noorda attempted to build an open source arsenal around AT&T Unix and Linux that failed to ever take off.

Apple server history


In 1996, the remains of his efforts were spun off as Caldera, which similarly attempted to create an OpenLinux specification for desktop users as an alternative to Microsoft Windows. By 2002, Caldera had refocused its efforts to target the Enterprise with United Linux.

Despite all of these Android-like, global initiatives to partner with and support Linux on the desktop, in the Enterprise, and, by 2005, on mobile devices (OpenMoko, LiMo and the beginnings of Android), there was no success to be found in simply being open, whether in the sense of open source, openly developed, or openly licensed.

Commercial success was being achieved by companies who had a proprietary edge: Microsoft had its Win32 APIs for creating Windows apps; Apple was making some money from its Mac OS; and Nokia, Palm and Blackberry were making money with mobile platforms that incorporated some open source elements, but crafted value from proprietary hardware or software.

Android appropriates Java



Sun attempted to target the nascent smartphone market with Java, and successfully claimed significant market share through open licensing. But this wasn't tremendously lucrative. It was simply a primordial soup that begged for exploitation by more sophisticated predators.Google's Android did to Sun what Sun had earlier done to OpenStep: appropriate its valuable concepts and turn them into a competing platform.

Sun's Mobile Java was eventually targeted by Google's Android, which did to Sun what Sun had earlier done to OpenStep: appropriate its valuable concepts and turn them into a competing platform.

Sun had originally developed Java to help sell its server hardware, but then moved on to simply license it to smartphone makers. Google developed Android to sell its ads, so it could undercut Sun's Java by offering it at zero cost. Android has now eaten up all of the market that Java once dominated.

However, while Android was in development, Apple developed its own iOS platform, which has eaten up not just significant market share but has also syphoned off the vast majority of the global phone industry's profits.

By any measure that involves dollar signs, iOS is trampling Android. It supports third party app development better, it satisfies users better and therefore sells hardware better, it handles security threats better, and conveys these advantages by being "closed" and integrated. Openness on Android has been, so far, largely a liability.

Android fails, even when free



Android's ability to replace Java isn't very impressive given that it was both technically superior to Java and free. But Android's ability to outsell iOS is even less impressive, because Android has only flourished in areas and among populations where Apple's iPhone hasn't reached, despite being a "free" platform.

Among the higher end markets for modern smartphone hardware that Apple operates in, iOS reigns both in market share and mindshare. Apple continues to make the most money even when you throw in millions of low end smartphones and feature phones running Android in the developing world.

Additionally, the cost of Android is going up due to new patent licensing requirements. So Google's strongest advantage of being able to broadly spread its ad platform across smartphones by virtue of the core OS being "free" is now eroding away.

Anyone who thinks Google has a Windows-like advantage over iOS and will repeat the 1990s is living in the wrong decade. We're observing a repeat of the 2000s, where Microsoft lost its dominance by desperately trying to support global hardware makers with a PC specification that simply could't move as fast as Apple's OS X because it was weighed down by hardware fragmentation and malware patches.

If Apple could win over the global efforts of an entrenched monopoly in PCs with well designed Macs (and Apple is certainly making more money than Microsoft now), it's hard to understand why so many people who witnessed Microsoft's fall are betting that Android won't continue to be hamstrung by similar issues.

This is particularly the case because Android has a weaker market position than Microsoft ever did, Google makes nearly nothing on Android compared to the licensing revenue Microsoft commanded, and the Android platform has never been taken very seriously by software developers, in stark contrast to the lingua franca that Windows long was for PC software.

Free, open and failing to generate revenue: the Web



The greatest example of a successful free and open product must certainly be the Internet, and particularly the web. But while lots of companies have supported their businesses with a web presence, the web itself isn't making anyone lots of money apart from Google, which sells the most web advertising.

The emergence of the web handily beat "closed," proprietary online services that once existed, including CompuServe and AOL. But something new is happening on the mobile web: it's being overshadowed by a closed, proprietary platform for web services: Apple's App Store.

App Store exclusives


Developers are making money on App Store titles, far more than they could make selling HTML5 applets on the web. There's little money to be made on the web outside of ads (a business Google dominates) because everyone expects the web to be free. Click a Google link to a news story, and you're unlikely to pull out your credit card to pay your way though a paywall just to read the story.

On the other hand, millions of people are actively buying apps through Apple, which the company makes an increasingly significant profit from selling in the App Store.

Google, Amazon and Microsoft have their own mobile software stores, but they aren't seeing similar levels of revenue generating traffic. Earning profits is more important than spreading free software.

Just ask Apple whether it makes more money selling apps in iTunes to its own iOS user base or from widely distributing WebKit code to virtually every mobile device on the planet. Volume is not better than profitable revenues.

Google's ads threatened by closed walls



If success were simply related to spreading free code, Apple would be beating Android with WebKit. Instead, Apple is beating Android with iOS, which not only sells apps, but also sells profitable hardware (Android is not selling the Nexus Q, and Google's other Nexus products are not selling at high volumes or at high margins either).

What Google should be increasingly concerned about is the fact that Apple is now encroaching upon its ad business. While Google has had little success spreading its ad savvy beyond web pages into "old media," Apple is gearing up to launch its iAd supported iTunes Radio, for free. It's not hard to imagine that iAds will someday appear to support video and TV programming, too (iTunes Radio also incorporates them, below).


video iAds in iTunes Radio


But today, the real money is currently in iOS apps, and Apple is increasingly monetizing apps for its developers, even as it removes the web-like cookie tracking from iOS that other advertisers want access to in order to make their ads in iOS titles more valuable to advertizers.

So simply from the perspective of credible threats to the status quo, Google faces more potential for losing its advertising monopoly to Apple's iAd (and related) initiatives than Apple does in losing its hardware sales to Android as an openly licensed platform.

That's because "open" doesn't always win. It usually loses to greater competence, and often serves as the training wheels for the very vehicles that eventually run it over.
post #2 of 310
Great timing AI. I'm sitting by the pool, just popped open a Shiner (beer), and now settling in for what I'm expecting will be another great read..

   

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post #3 of 310
Open has been successful though. Android took the feature phone and buried it. Everyone has been better off with Android on the cheaper phones.

I don't know if Google has been all about profit. Maybe they just want to elevate the level of technology out in the world. In other words - be good. Google Glass is a good example of that.
post #4 of 310
TLDR it all yet but the first part seems sound.
If you don't pay much for your phone, you'll refuse pay much for apps.
That's why the Apple Appstore is so successful.
post #5 of 310
served by a web server running the apache web server. you know, the free, open source, piece of software. what other open source software are you using, appleinsider? DED, you?
"Personally, I would like nothing more than to thoroughly proof each and every word of my articles before posting. But I can't."

appleinsider's mike campbell, august 15, 2013
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"Personally, I would like nothing more than to thoroughly proof each and every word of my articles before posting. But I can't."

appleinsider's mike campbell, august 15, 2013
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post #6 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooch View Post

served by a web server running the apache web server. you know, the free, open source, piece of software. what other open source software are you using, appleinsider? DED, you?

 

But is Rob McCool rich because of the widespread use of apache web server?  DED mentions that his determining factor for success in this article is monetary.  By that measure, yes, open source is failing.  Not sure why a huge article needed to be written saying that giving away your software for free is not as profitable as selling it, but he's certainly correct.

 

If one were to consider factors like amount of users or the non-financial benefits of moving the world forward then obviously you can't say open-source software fails in those terms.

post #7 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

If one were to consider factors like amount of users or the non-financial benefits of moving the world forward then obviously you can't say open-source software fails in those terms.
Would open source "moving the world forward" resulted in iPod, iTunes, iPhone, or iPad equivalent devices? If you think so then you might also believe a room full of chimps with typewriters would eventually produce Hamlet.
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
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post #8 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooch View Post

what other open source software are you using, appleinsider? DED, you?

 

current as of April 2013, appleinsider is running on Linux with pages served up by Apache.  the site also uses JavaScript, jQuery and jQueryUI.  for HTTP compression, they are likely using gzip.  all of these six (6) things are open source.

 

that said, however, the article mentions -- in this very specific context -- success is based on monetary returns.

post #9 of 310
The article doesn't state open software is a failure for not generating revenue. It simply refutes the widely-held notion that Android is winning because it is open and "doesn't need to generate revenue" because Google doesn't have a direct profit motive.

The factors that have made computing platforms relevant are the ability to run valuable software and serve useful tasks with reliability, security and satisfaction.

Android isn't winning in any if those areas.

As a loss leader to sell Google advertising, Android is also performing poorly.
post #10 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post


Would open source "moving the world forward" resulted in iPod, iTunes, iPhone, or iPad equivalent devices? If you think so then you might also believe a room full of chimps with typewriters would eventually produce Hamlet.

 

The question you should be asking is, "Would iPods, iTunes, iPhones, or iPads exist as they are today if it weren't for open source projects?"

post #11 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

The question you should be asking is, "Would iPods, iTunes, iPhones, or iPads exist as they are today if it weren't for open source projects?"
Okay, I'll ask. You answer with specific projects without which these things could not have been made.
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post #12 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post


Okay, I'll ask. You answer with specific projects without which these things could not have been made.

 

I'll start with the easy one.  Where would those products be without the Internet?  You do realize a humungous portion of the Internet runs on open source software, right?

 

I'm not sure I see where the disagreement is coming from.  Are you suggesting that open source projects haven't helped to move the world forward?


Edited by DroidFTW - 7/6/13 at 4:47pm
post #13 of 310
Well the only thing, I can see not mentioned, is that Open and Free Linux, is now used for tons of servers and server farms. In which Linux basically crushed Apples chances at selling enterprise hardware like Xserves. And the fact that Apple didn't allow it's OS to be installed on non-proprietary servers, didn't help. That huge segment of the Computer Industry is now gone, I don't see how Apple could ever get back in...
Adobe Systems - "Preventing the Case-Sensitive revolution everyday..."
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Adobe Systems - "Preventing the Case-Sensitive revolution everyday..."
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post #14 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTel View Post


I don't know if Google has been all about profit. Maybe they just want to elevate the level of technology out in the world. In other words - be good. Google Glass is a good example of that.

What an optimistic view of humanity! Unfortuately, so utterly mistaken as well. Google does want to elevate the level of technology out there but only to enhance each and every one of us as consumer units that it can slice and dice, dress up, package, and sell to advertisers.

You have plenty to learn, and will be greatly disappointed before you achieve true wisdom, grasshopper.
post #15 of 310
Most of my Android and "open" friends and fanboys say winning is all about the numbers, not the profit. The more Android phones they can count the better, even if the vast majority are barely feature phones and those that are get used way less often than their iOS counterparts.

They are convinced that raw numbers isn't just winning but has already won. They are convinced Google is doing this out of the goodness of their hearts or to spite Apple%u2026

You provide some really good arguments but you won't shut down the "Fandroid" crowd with facts as long as they can pull out that numbers card. Its all they care about%u2026 besides tech specs. Many that I know don't even really seem to enjoy their phones. They aren't on Twitter, Instagram, Vine, barely email or text, and frankly seem to want to make actual phone calls rather than stumble and fumble with technology. (and these are engineer type individuals)

One day this smartphone holy war will be over.. I hope it is soon. I want to continue enjoying my iDevice without some oversized plastic clone-phone carrying individual telling me how much Apple sucks. I think they just like to complain about what someone else has since they are obviously not enjoying what they own.
post #16 of 310

And people wonder why android fanboys are drawn to this site... If you go on androidcentral.com or XDA you rarely see any mention of apple.


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 7/6/13 at 5:03pm
post #17 of 310
This article made me think this. It would be cool to read an article something like this for Apple's recent decision to support OpenGL and OpenCL over CUDA and the likes. Like with the new MacPro that's coming out later this year.
post #18 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by rezwits View Post

. And the fact that Apple didn't allow it's OS to be installed on non-proprietary servers, didn't help. That huge segment of the Computer Industry is now gone, I don't see how Apple could ever get back in...

I don't think that is hurting Apple.
post #19 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

The article doesn't state open software is a failure for not generating revenue. It simply refutes the widely-held notion that Android is winning because it is open and "doesn't need to generate revenue" because Google doesn't have a direct profit motive.

Can you provide some evidence for the premise that the "notion that Android is winning because it is open" is "widely-held"? How is "winning" defined?

post #20 of 310
What definition of failure is being used here?

What does winning mean?
post #21 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by emacs72 View Post

 

that said, however, the article mentions -- in this very specific context -- success is based on monetary returns.

 

Well in that case this article is a complete failure because i'm measuring by this very specific context: success is based on how many monkeys can fly out of my butt in the time it takes to read the article.

post #22 of 310

You're completely missing the whole point of open. Open isn't about profit, it's about creating a commodity that everyone can benefit from. If you judge it by the rules of a different game, of course it's going to fail.

 

Open means that something that has become a commodity can be shared and updated for minimal expenditure. Everyone can then spend their R&D budget on the next layer, rather than trying to reinvent the wheel.

 

Why do you think that WebKit was open sourced? Why do you think that OS X and iOS use an open source kernel?

 

This is the kind of article I expect to see from someone who has "equivalent of a Masters degree in Computer Science". 1rolleyes.gif

post #23 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Why do you think that WebKit was open sourced?

So Google could steal it properly, unlike everything else.

'Course they managed to screw it up anyway.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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post #24 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

So Google could steal it properly, unlike everything else.

'Course they managed to screw it up anyway.
How can you steal something that's open?
post #25 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrrodriguez View Post

How can you steal something that's open?

It's a lot easier than stealing something closed, isn't it?

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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Originally posted by Relic

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post #26 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooch View Post

served by a web server running the apache web server. you know, the free, open source, piece of software. what other open source software are you using, appleinsider? DED, you?

Or the OS X kernel, or Safari's WebKit, or...

 

http://www.apple.com/opensource/

post #27 of 310
A fairer yardstick to measure "success" would be what economists call "social surplus".

Let's say that open source developer A creates a software that she gives away for free and that generates a utility of $10 Dollars for each consumer (meaning that the consumer has a willingness to pay up to $10 for the software). Then the social surplus is $10 and it all goes to the consumer.

Now instead assume that developer A runs a for-profit firm and sells the software for $5. The consumer will derive a net surplus of $5 now. In this case, the social surplus is equally divided between profits to the developer and consumer surplus.

Obviously, Apache and other open source projects generate huge economic surplus even though they make 0 profits.
post #28 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

It's a lot easier than stealing something closed, isn't it?

Lol what?

Apple - "Hey I have this open source software that anyone can use and modify"

Google - "Oh cool let me add that to a browser I'm building."

Apple - "Stop THIEF!"

Google - "What the hell? You said its open source, how am I stealing it?"

Apple - "I meant its only open for me to use and Apple fan developers to do all the coding work so we don't have to pay them and keep our massive profits."
post #29 of 310
Double post
post #30 of 310
This is hilarious. Apple and everything it does is built on BSD. Between Linux and BSD you have 95% of all smart phones.

Open completely dominates this industry.

The only thing these days that isn't open is MS Windows. Which is losing everywhere you look.

Look in any geek household these days. What runs on an open OS? Routers. Cable boxes. TV's. Smartphones. Cable modems. NAS boxes. Tablets. What do they connect to? Server farms. When is the last time you saw a server farm running a closed OS?

This war is OVAH. And open has won. Bigtime.
post #31 of 310

Typo! I believe it should be cookie tracking and not "cooking tracking"...

post #32 of 310
"Editorial" the title says, as if 95% of the things posted on this site aren't already Editorials.
post #33 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post


I don't think that is hurting Apple.

This was discussed in an article that the former Chairman/CEO. Ben Rosen, of Compaq discussed.  Back in the 80's, Apple had approached Compaq and others about licensing Mac OS to run on their PCs to offer an alternative to Windows.  They had it running on X86 processors.  Ben Rosen had told Jobs that he thought it would make a good idea for a variety of reasons and they Apple would be better of designing the OS and hardware and continuing to do the same thing they were doing from the beginning.  BTW, after Compaq got bought up by HP, Ben Rosen switched from Windows to Mac and wrote Jobs that letter thanking him for exposing him to the Mac, because it's now his computer or choice.

 

I heard rumblings several years back that both HP and Dell wanted to license OS X to through on their computers and offer to their customers.

 

From what I heard from RELIABLE sources is that Apple (jobs) didn't think it was a good idea for several reasons and one of them is that Apple, being the developer  of hardware and software, felt it would be in the best interest if they didn't because Apple can support their OS and hardware combination better than a third party hardware vendor can and there would be different user experiences since HP and Dell might not implement the same feature set of hardware since Apple, at the time, had built-in FIrewire and these guys didn't as standard equipment, and Jobs didn't want to damage the user experience from being different from hardware mfg to hardware mfg as that was, and still is a bone of contention with the Microsoft business model.

 

I think that because IBM and Microsoft were in bed together from their beginnings, that's what gave them clout to the business world and then the home, and Jobs just didn't have the Enterprise background, which he needed.  Even Jobs admitted that he lacked that expertise.  Slowly but surely Apple is becoming more Enterprise friendly and as a result, they are getting more bigger business as a result. But they still need work in that area.

 

I don't know if Apple could easily handle a large swap of Enterprise customers switching platforms all at once so the other way is that companies are now opening up to their employees the BYOD model, which IS working for Apple.  Some companies as much as 30% of the employees at some companies are bringing their own MB to work instead of the corporate issued PC.  Some companies are actually starting to open up to their users the ability to choose between a Mac and PC as their work computer, but there are a lot that are buying iPads for many employees.

post #34 of 310

I can tell by poster's comments many have a very short attention span since they obviously didn't read the entire article. Daniel always writes long, in depth, technical articles and it's apparent many readers just don't don't get it. For those of you who live on Mars, the way things work on planet Earth are as follows: he who makes the most money wins! In addition, companies, especially those who are publicly traded, have to make money in order to survive. They don't survive by being good citizens giving away "free" software. They can do that a bit of the time but the majority of the time has to be spent producing a product that sells enough to keep the company in business.

post #35 of 310
It's refreshingly nice to say this:

Android, is DOOMED!
post #36 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob53 View Post

I can tell by poster's comments many have a very short attention span since they obviously didn't read the entire article. Daniel always writes long, in depth, technical articles and it's apparent many readers just don't don't get it. For those of you who live on Mars, the way things work on planet Earth are as follows: he who makes the most money wins! In addition, companies, especially those who are publicly traded, have to make money in order to survive. They don't survive by being good citizens giving away "free" software. They can do that a bit of the time but the majority of the time has to be spent producing a product that sells enough to keep the company in business.

 

That, plus not understanding that nothing in the article suggests that open source development has not contributed to the advancement of computing technology, but rather that it has failed to generate much profit for those companies that have relied on it for their products.

post #37 of 310

I think you have hit the nail on the head with this article. 

 

I also had no idea that Firefox was a money pit. I guess I thought volunteer effort was just that along with volunteer resources. I guess not.

post #38 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMushroom View Post

A fairer yardstick to measure "success" would be what economists call "social surplus".

Let's say that open source developer A creates a software that she gives away for free and that generates a utility of $10 Dollars for each consumer (meaning that the consumer has a willingness to pay up to $10 for the software). Then the social surplus is $10 and it all goes to the consumer.

Now instead assume that developer A runs a for-profit firm and sells the software for $5. The consumer will derive a net surplus of $5 now. In this case, the social surplus is equally divided between profits to the developer and consumer surplus.

Obviously, Apache and other open source projects generate huge economic surplus even though they make 0 profits.

Pure economic Gobbeldy gook !
You can't ascribe a $ value to something that doesn't have a price, then wrap it up nice and neatly and call it social surplus.
The fact that a dev turns around and sells it for $5 means its value is FIVE dollars not whatever number you pull out of your hat. If the dev could charge $10 do you think he/she would ? Of course they would. Then your social surplus would be what, 0 or would you try and up it because of lost Opportunity Cost just so that you can have a social surplus ?
What about if the dev sold it for $20 - does that mean that your social surplus is a negative number ? Is it now costing an economy to have something sell for what people are willing to pay for ?
My point being that it has to be able to be measured accurately - otherwise it's meaningless.
Edited by RobM - 7/6/13 at 7:44pm
post #39 of 310

I think you forgot the /s, but, since I think your comments are representative of a certain mentality...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTel View Post

Open has been successful though. Android took the feature phone and buried it. Everyone has been better off with Android on the cheaper phones.

 

 

Are they really better off though? The usage data suggest that most of these people with Android phones are just using them as feature phones. In fact, as a suggested at least a couple of years ago, Android is the new feature phone OS. The difference, of course, is that all these people are now saddled with a data plan that they, from all evidence don't need or make use of. So, are they really better off, or has Android mostly been a boon to the carriers? Again, the evidence points to the latter outcome.

 

Quote:
I don't know if Google has been all about profit. Maybe they just want to elevate the level of technology out in the world. In other words - be good. Google Glass is a good example of that.

 

This is patently laughable, especially on the eve of the Reader shutdown. Google doesn't do anything just to, "elevate the level of technology." Everything they do is about gaining control -- control of information and access to it, control of personal data, control and exploitation of data they have no rights to (e.g., Google Books) -- and leveraging that control to make money, period. Sure, they spin a nice "just so" tale, and they pay their PR people handsomely to do so, but that's all it is, a tale. The level of rapacious greed for money, control and power at Google, and the hypocrisy and dishonesty they engage in to further those ends, makes Microsoft in its heyday look like amateur hour.

 

And, as pointed out, the sad part is that there will always be plenty of people, incapable of, or too lazy to engage in, serious critical thought, who will unthinkingly buy in to the fairy tale.

post #40 of 310
NeXT failed [though we were about to go IPO in '96 when merger talks started] not because of it's BSD Unix underpinnings but because the market in 1996 was OEM strangleheld by Microsoft.

No vendor in their right mind [business wise] would bet their application futures by porting Windows based apps or Mac OS apps and invest in OPENSTEP, no matter how the cost was minimal.

Bill Gates strategically refused to port any app to NeXTSTEP, though we were in negotiations with them.

IBM was ready to dump OS/2 for NeXTSTEP when a top level OS/2 engineer rigged the demo with IBM Executives by putting NeXTSTEP in a virtual machine on top of the IBM Big Iron. We demoed it earlier running circles around OS/2 and any other UNIX System V based OS IBM had but one prick effed it all up.

Adobe pulled the plug on porting their suite to NeXTSTEP even though the benefits were proven.

In short, the dominant players were all in bed with each other and it wasn't until the Internet did the notion of alternative Operating Systems could become dominant leaders.

These same ass hats were blind-sided by the iPod/iTunes juggernaut and the return of Steve Jobs with all that NeXT IP.

They laughed it off as a one-off and mocked the idea of an iPhone. The rest is history.

Execution and keeping your cards close to your chest is the only way to make it in the industry. People will eff you left and right if they can. Bill Gates is the king of it.
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