or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Using Google Glass: A series of awkward encounters
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Using Google Glass: A series of awkward encounters - Page 3

post #81 of 231
Anyone who looks like they're wearing a toupee on top of a wig will get strange responses.
post #82 of 231
I don't want to be recorded by someone I'm having a conversation with. Plus these look dorky, even in black. If you use these socially, you can expect to become a lot less popular.

I can see professional uses, but the violation of privacy you get when wearing these is just too much.

That said, I like that they're trying new things, and I hope that good things do come out of this.
post #83 of 231

Imagine if you held your phone up all the time like you were taking a picture?  Or those people who have the bluetooth headset in their ears even when they aren't on a call.  THAT's google glass.  It's like holding a camera up to everyone and no one will like you.  Like the BT earpiece guy, everyone will think you're a douche.  And you are... if you are wearing it when you obviously don't need to be.

 

It's interesting how the tech of our dreams is snuffed out by the way people react to it when it finally exists.  Segway's were banned by some communities before they even launched.  And even today, you seldom see them.

 

Google glass is a good example of just because you can do something doesn't mean you should.

 

Now, the forthcoming iWatch... we'll see how that goes over.  I bet you it will be better received than Google glass.


Edited by Eriamjh - 7/7/13 at 5:10pm
post #84 of 231
Considering I, like many people out there are still self-conscious using Siri in public, Google Glass definitely has an uphill battle for acceptance. Kudos to google for getting this started.
post #85 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by coollector View Post

The red light should definitively be hardwired, and if the led is dead, then the camera is dead too.

 

Google has to take this privacy issue very seriously, because it could kill the product.

 

On a side note, if I were a bar owner, I wouldn't ban the GG, but I'd probably put some tape on the camera to tranquilize the other clients.

I agree with the hardwiring part and the privacy issue but if I were a bar or restaurant owner I'd ban GG for sure. I can see GG being very useful for certain circumstances, applications and situations but I hope GG never gets accepted as an everyday common general use item.

Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
Reply
Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
Reply
post #86 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by coollector View Post

The red light should definitively be hardwired, and if the led is dead, then the camera is dead too.

Google has to take this privacy issue very seriously, because it could kill the product.

Haha. As creepy Eric would say: if you don't want your activity being filmed, maybe you shouldn't be doing it. Or you could move.
post #87 of 231
I bet you most vids from Glass will be cleavage shots.
post #88 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

I bet you most vids from Glass will be cleavage shots.

Well, in my defense, that's where I look all the time.lol.gif

post #89 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

I bet you most vids from Glass will be cleavage shots.

 

Nerds Gone Wild.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #90 of 231

This article is no surprise, there are lots of technologies which do not take into consideration the social aspects and are failures because of this. As people walk around with these devices and others realize what it is they will become more hostile towards it. Yes there are lots of camera's watching us ever day, but very few people actually notice them nor is streamed all over the world.  And when they do, like in stores which show your video as you walk around those who notice begin trying to avoid the camera's line of sight this is human nature. There is one thing to be watched from a distance but it is another thing to be recorded up close.

 

This is exactly why always on video calls/conference never took off. Technologist been trying to put a camera on ever phone for a long time and its failed every time, due to the social aspects they Technologist fail to understand. Simple put you can look your worse and go out and not think twice about it, but as soon as someone pulls out a camera, those same people want to go and fix themselves so they do not look bad. Add in the fact that if people think you might be streaming it all over the internet, people will be hostile towards those wearing google glasses.

 

Those say Skype is very popular, that because people choose to participate, and they are ask to show themselves and they have the final choose on transmitting their video. Not true to something like Google Glass, plus someone video chatting with a user of GG with become very suspicious of someone who they can not see and only see what they see.

post #91 of 231

Google Glass:  $1,500

Hoodie to hide the $1,500 thing on your head:  $25

Seeing someone eye-tweet about too much foam on their latte while stepping into an open manhole?  Priceless. 

post #92 of 231
So do they account for people who need prescription lenses? Might be a fair percentage of the target market.
post #93 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post

Imagine if you held your phone up all the time like you were taking a picture?  Or those people who have the bluetooth headset in their ears even when they aren't on a call.  THAT's google glass.  It's like holding a camera up to everyone and no one will like you.  Like the BT earpiece guy, everyone will think you're a douche.  And you are... if you are wearing it when you obviously don't need to be.

It's interesting how the tech of our dreams is snuffed out by the way people react to it when it finally exists.  Segway's were banned by some communities before they even launched.  And even today, you seldom see them.

Google glass is a good example of just because you can do something doesn't mean you should.

Now, the forthcoming iWatch... we'll see how that goes over.  I bet you it will be better received than Google glass.

Didn't Steve hate the Segway and trash their initial marketing approach?

I bet he would have hated GG, or rather the tech behind it. At least for consumer use.

As of others have said, this likely has a professional application: doctors, mechanics, even warehouse workers (auto scanning of barcodes and RFID), etc.
post #94 of 231
I fully understand the dork and privacy issues.

But, GG is also an incredibly useful tool, not only in niche markets.

Imagine when hiking and you get directions from GG.
Or better, where flora and fauna are recognized and GG explains you everything about it.

Going around in musea can be much more fun and instructive

The thing is, the possibilities with a device like GG are just limitless

I predict a device like GG will be a hit. Not an instant hit but therés just too much value in the proposition that it'll be DOA.
post #95 of 231
Something like Google glass may be very useful e.g. for doing inventory in a warehouse, packing mail order shipments, accessing medical records during medical procedures, capturing instructional or documentary video close up in confined spaces, etc.

However I'd smack it off everyone's head who'd dare to cross my property line wearing one...

The Borg has no place in public, regardless how many uneducated but knowledgable techno geeks believe that doing everything that can be done is progress without deeply questioning if it should be done, and for what purpose and whose benefit.

If people are too lazy to pull out a smartphone to look something up in Wikipedia then they need to be smacked, or they know so little that they have to look up so much that it matters. In that case however more technology is not a solution to a lack of studying.
post #96 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcfa View Post

Something like Google glass may be very useful e.g. for doing inventory in a warehouse, packing mail order shipments, accessing medical records during medical procedures, capturing instructional or documentary video close up in confined spaces, etc.

However I'd smack it off everyone's head who'd dare to cross my property line wearing one...

The Borg has no place in public, regardless how many uneducated but knowledgable techno geeks believe that doing everything that can be done is progress without deeply questioning if it should be done, and for what purpose and whose benefit.

If people are too lazy to pull out a smartphone to look something up in Wikipedia then they need to be smacked, or they know so little that they have to look up so much that it matters. In that case however more technology is not a solution to a lack of studying.

you're using the exact same arguments as those used 40 years ago against calculators

post #97 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blitz1 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by rcfa View Post

Something like Google glass may be very useful e.g. for doing inventory in a warehouse, packing mail order shipments, accessing medical records during medical procedures, capturing instructional or documentary video close up in confined spaces, etc.

However I'd smack it off everyone's head who'd dare to cross my property line wearing one...

The Borg has no place in public, regardless how many uneducated but knowledgable techno geeks believe that doing everything that can be done is progress without deeply questioning if it should be done, and for what purpose and whose benefit.

If people are too lazy to pull out a smartphone to look something up in Wikipedia then they need to be smacked, or they know so little that they have to look up so much that it matters. In that case however more technology is not a solution to a lack of studying.

you're using the exact same arguments as those used 40 years ago against calculators

 

Calculators rarely seem to pose a threat to ones privacy and personal space.

post #98 of 231
Anything to get attention........ I think Lester's wife might file for a divorce if she can't get her husband to take those things off and pay attention to her. Lester, trust me, take the things off and chock it up to a $1600 mistake. You probably can't sell them for a period of time, can you? Otherwise, stick the things on eBay and get your money back from the next sucker. Just a suggestion.
post #99 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blitz1 View Post

you're using the exact same arguments as those used 40 years ago against calculators

Since the Borg was intro'd in 1989, I say those calculator critics were ahead if their time 40 years ago. 1smile.gif

No one carried a calculator with them in public back then.
post #100 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

Calculators rarely seem to pose a threat to ones privacy and personal space.

And by "rarely" you mean "never."

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #101 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

Calculators rarely seem to pose a threat to ones privacy and personal space.

And by "rarely" you mean "never."

 

Well, never in my experience. There are some strange people posting here though.

post #102 of 231
Even before the bad reviews Google Glass seems lame, lame, lame. Should be a giant hit in a few years, wonder who will be the one to perfect the experience and make all the money.
post #103 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blitz1 View Post

I fully understand the dork and privacy issues.

But, GG is also an incredibly useful tool, not only in niche markets.

Imagine when hiking and you get directions from GG.
Or better, where flora and fauna are recognized and GG explains you everything about it.

Going around in musea can be much more fun and instructive

The thing is, the possibilities with a device like GG are just limitless

I predict a device like GG will be a hit. Not an instant hit but therés just too much value in the proposition that it'll be DOA.
 

I agree GG could be very useful and informative but the camera use could be too intrusive for general use.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blitz1 View Post

you're using the exact same arguments as those used 40 years ago against calculators

 

I disagree,the calculator could never be used in a manner that could be considered as an invasion of a person's general privacy expectations.

Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
Reply
Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
Reply
post #104 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Realistic View Post

I agree GG could be very useful and informative but the camera use could be too intrusive for general use.

 

 

I disagree,the calculator could never be used in a manner that could be considered as an invasion of a person's general privacy expectations.

You're misrepresenting my post.
I was referring to the 'knowledge' part of rfca's argument not to the privacy issue.

I agree, I should have been more specific.

 

Considering the big picture, I think there is no way to avoid borgification of the human species.
The advantages (brain controlled artificial limbs, enhanced brain functionality, ...) are simply to great.

 

And yes, it will come at a steep cost, but then again we might want to have another look at privacy and how to enforce it

like putting a privacy lock on data as facebook does. Now, please don't say FB privacy is a joke. I know that. But that's more related to

the way it's implemented in FB, not on it's core principles. One might think of obfuscating images based on some privacy settings from the

person whose picture is taken, ...

post #105 of 231
The Borg? The bête noir of adolescents and adults who think like them. .
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #106 of 231

Wearing Google Glass is like you're holding smartphone in the "recording video" position all the time wherever you go. No wonder people felt uneasy.

You can say "hey! my finger ain't on the shutter" but nobody will care.

 

post #107 of 231
I am certainly not a Google fan, and I care about privacy issues. But seriously, this discussion is far from reasonable.

Go to any specialised electronics shop. You will find cameras (still and video) and microphones / voice recording systems in all form factors. Stuff looking like fountain pens, knobs, jewellery, watches, glasses... Tons of that wannabe spy stuff, most of it far less expensive than Google's Glass. Pretty much all of this stuff can be used without anybody knowing, all of it is far less obvious than Google Glass (and most of it might have longer battery life).

So. Why is Google Glass a problem, and all these other articles are not? Because we have never heard of them? Because they are not mass market (which Google Glass at the current price point certainly isn't either)? Because they are not from Google?

Is the difficult part Google's coupling with location services? The fact that the could easily add facial recognition at some point? What is the real problem? People taking pictures or video without you knowing certainly isn't. There are several ways to do that.
post #108 of 231

I never saw the appeal of Google Glass, and if someone were wearing it on their face while interacting with me, I would be concerned about not having their full attention, or getting recorded without permission. 

 

Mind you, Google Glass is just the beginning and it's only a matter of time before we get a HUD with all types of information integrated into sunglasses, windshields, goggles, binoculars, etc etc.

 

With Google Glass, it's just not seamless or naturally integrated, so it not only makes you look stupid, but it makes others uneasy.

 

And given that Google is a personal information peddler, it's easy to see why people would not want what and who they see stored in some Google server for advertisers or the NSA.

post #109 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

I am certainly not a Google fan, and I care about privacy issues. But seriously, this discussion is far from reasonable.

Go to any specialised electronics shop. You will find cameras (still and video) and microphones / voice recording systems in all form factors. Stuff looking like fountain pens, knobs, jewellery, watches, glasses... Tons of that wannabe spy stuff, most of it far less expensive than Google's Glass. Pretty much all of this stuff can be used without anybody knowing, all of it is far less obvious than Google Glass (and most of it might have longer battery life).

So. Why is Google Glass a problem, and all these other articles are not? Because we have never heard of them? Because they are not mass market (which Google Glass at the current price point certainly isn't either)? Because they are not from Google?

That doesn't mean you can go to any place and make a recording. 

 

Because it's right there on your head and you can make a recording any time (and post it to Facebook), sometimes as easy as blinking an eye. Surely you can see the difference right? 

 

Is it legal if you're recording something on other people's property with a spy devices? Can somebody sue you if they found out you use these stealth devices recording and posting it to Facebook? Have you ever ponder these questions?


Edited by matrix07 - 7/8/13 at 12:14am
post #110 of 231

Eventually wearing computers will not be considered weird or geeky, it will just be something everyone does. They might not be glasses though. 

post #111 of 231
one woman who was wearing google glasses said she often got comments from people on street as a 'f**king cyborg'
post #112 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by coollector View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMacMan View Post

When using a phone or a camera, it's a little obvious your filming or taking a shot. With Glasses, you're just wearing it and people don't know if you actuly recording or not. So privacy concern is real.
It'd be so much better if the GG showed a red light when they're recording. Also, it could help if the camera objective had a lid, and it's clearly visible if the lid is on or off. You could place the lid on the objective, and people would know for sure that they have nothing to fear.

Oh, so now it's only recording voice, not video. Cool, everything is fine now... NOT!

The key difference between that and e.g. the iPhones recording ability: you can turn on recording with the blink of an eye, without anyone knowing. With the phone, you either have to be recording all the time, or have the phone in some sort of ready-state to turn it on without pulling it out, launching an app, etc.

There's a reason why even things like smart phones are prohibited in many places, the last thing we need is these headsets going everywhere.
post #113 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I want to always be able to turn off the shutter sound if I want or need to and rely on myself to protect myself from any surreptitious filming.

Flip the silent switch before taking a pic; it won't 'sound the shutter sound'.
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

One of the pioneers of personal devices like these was a shy researcher who could never remember people's names.  But, just like the Big Bang Theory guys, he needed to do so in order to help get grants at university mixers.

So he built a portable computer hooked to a camera in his glasses, along with face recognition software.  When he met someone, he recorded their face and introduction.  Later, the process was reversed so that his earpiece would read back the intro for that person.

To me, that is pathetic. I love it when people are upfront about these kind of things and have no problem giving them my name again. What will tick me off is if I find out the person isn't really being authentic and using tech to remind them of my name.

Looks like tech will take away our communicating with people, which doesn't seem like a good thing. A bit like Facebook, where everyone will just try to out-funny the previous poster, instead of having a discussion.
“A PC is no bargain when it doesn’t do what you want.” - Apple 2009
Reply
“A PC is no bargain when it doesn’t do what you want.” - Apple 2009
Reply
post #114 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blitz1 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by rcfa View Post

Something like Google glass may be very useful e.g. for doing inventory in a warehouse, packing mail order shipments, accessing medical records during medical procedures, capturing instructional or documentary video close up in confined spaces, etc.


However I'd smack it off everyone's head who'd dare to cross my property line wearing one...


The Borg has no place in public, regardless how many uneducated but knowledgable techno geeks believe that doing everything that can be done is progress without deeply questioning if it should be done, and for what purpose and whose benefit.


If people are too lazy to pull out a smartphone to look something up in Wikipedia then they need to be smacked, or they know so little that they have to look up so much that it matters. In that case however more technology is not a solution to a lack of studying.
you're using the exact same arguments as those used 40 years ago against calculators

And they are just as valid then as now. If you need to pull out a calculator to calculate a lunar orbit, then that's OK. But if you have to pull out a calculator to figure out how much a 20% tip is, then you have a serious issue.
The mind works only as well as it's exercised. Just like a workout is "painful", if you want a healthy body, that's what it takes. And if you want a healthy mind, able to think, then the pain of learning and exercising one's mental abilities is just part of that. Delegating everything to a machine means your mind becomes a undifferentiated grey mush.
One just needs to look at the lack of logical reasoning skills and lack of language skills displayed by the vast majority of people these days to see where things are going. Worst of all, in times past, stupid people knew they were stupid and they were hiding under a rock; today the dumber they are, the more entitled they feel, and their uneducated rants destroy the signal to noise ratio just about everywhere one goes.
post #115 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreyfus2 View Post

What is the real problem? People taking pictures or video without you knowing certainly isn't. There are several ways to do that.

The privacy and the annoyance are 2 different things. The privacy is of course a serious subject, but you can't ignore the annoyance either. Even if I'm not doing anything wrong, I don't like to have a camera on my face. I don't want to live in a world where everyone is filming everyone. If a guy films me with his GG, I'll ask him to stop, and if he doesn't want to stop, I'll make him stop, even if I have to break his expensive toy.

 

If some persons are completely fine with the GG, great for them! But they have to respect the persons that the GG make uncomfortable. It's like with cigarettes: when you're a smoker (and a civilized person), you respect the non-smokers.

post #116 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

By definition, if you're wearing Google Glass, you're a dork. So, it doesn't matter how cool you are before you put it on, once you do you're a dork.

Cool, I love being a dork. Like it or not in the very near future devices like this will become the norm. It's just a matter of time till Apple has a Google Glass type device in their product line which will then ultimately kill off the cell phone.

Then later we will all have devices like this;

When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
Reply
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
Reply
post #117 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post


Then later we will all have devices like this;

Me too, I'm very excited by this kind of device. I dream of a head mounted display with the resolution of a computer screen (or even better). The GG have a poor resolution, but they'll certainly boost this kind of technology.

 

I also understand that the GG must have a camera for the augmented reality. But where I think that Google is missing the point, is when they present the GG, they only show people filming what they see. Head mounted cameras exist since a long time, and they have better resolutions than the GG. The GG should be something completely different.

 

I've been super excited when I've heard that Google launched the project Glass. But now that I've seen the product, I know that I won't buy it, and even worse, I know that I will be annoyed by the persons who'll buy it :(


Edited by coollector - 7/8/13 at 2:21am
post #118 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcfa View Post

The mind works only as well as it's exercised. Just like a workout is "painful", if you want a healthy body, that's what it takes. And if you want a healthy mind, able to think, then the pain of learning and exercising one's mental abilities is just part of that. Delegating everything to a machine means your mind becomes a undifferentiated grey mush.

You wouldn't delegate everything to it though, just the things it was better at, such as (as you said) big number crunching or remember lots of tiny facts. Human memory is not that great, I personally look forward to the day when my hat can remember things for me.

post #119 of 231
“A PC is no bargain when it doesn’t do what you want.” - Apple 2009
Reply
“A PC is no bargain when it doesn’t do what you want.” - Apple 2009
Reply
post #120 of 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by coollector View Post


I've been super excited when I've heard that Google launched the project Glass. But now that I've seen the product, I know that I won't buy it, and even worse, I know that I will be annoyed by the persons who'll buy it 1frown.gif

Yea, I wouldn't buy one either but I'm definitely excited that this technology is being pursued. I'll wait until the device is built into a normal pair of glasses, impossible to tell the difference between a normal pair or Google Glasses.
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
Reply
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Using Google Glass: A series of awkward encounters