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Samsung passes Apple's iPhone in smartphone Web usage - report - Page 2

post #41 of 69

Not according to NetMarketshare they don't.   I'm wondering how much of all this market share data a close to reality.

post #42 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by VL-Tone View Post

Because this study shows the relative percentage of web usage between platforms.

If Apple iPhone sales flatlined because of the wait for the 5S, while Samsung is aggressively marketing its new S4 flagship model, Apple's web usage ratio will drop.

It will only affect it if the people buying S4s are first time smartphone buyers.
post #43 of 69

It was weird that all those people with their large screened Samsung phones weren't using the internet, I at least use my tiny iPod in the shitter to do some time waster web browsing, I can't imagine other people not doing that no matter what brand.

 

And listen, if the competition is getting better at it, then Apple needs to step up, what else? Net result, we enjoy better gadgets, pay a little coinage, not really "a little", sigh...

post #44 of 69
I love how when Apple is on top, a lot of people here are like "take that Samsung! Apple is obviously going to be on top". Then, as soon as the data shows Samsung is in the lead, everyone is like "data is faulty, not reliable, could never happen".

It's ok if Apple is not on top. We all know they make a superior product, but we shouldn't turn into those who skew the data or pick and choose based on what supports our position. Let the data stand for itself. Apple will be back on top in due time.
post #45 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timbit View Post

I love how when Apple is on top, a lot of people here are like "take that Samsung! Apple is obviously going to be on top". Then, as soon as the data shows Samsung is in the lead, everyone is like "data is faulty, not reliable, could never happen".

It's ok if Apple is not on top. We all know they make a superior product, but we shouldn't turn into those who skew the data or pick and choose based on what supports our position. Let the data stand for itself. Apple will be back on top in due time.

 

 

Well, it's because the data IS faulty.  When you don't properly account for vastly different internet usage rates from country to country and you leave out a buttload of iOS devices, it skews the data. There's nothing wrong with pointing out the bleeding obvious.
post #46 of 69

Amazeballs.  To the Samsung sycophant site!!

post #47 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanTiger View Post


Fair enough, but then we shouldn't think it's good data when Apple is on top. We just need to be honest, regardless of who is "winning"
post #48 of 69
Paid for by Samsung
post #49 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timbit View Post


Fair enough, but then we shouldn't think it's good data when Apple is on top. We just need to be honest, regardless of who is "winning"

 

Well, it's not that we thought it was "good" data with Apple on top and the same data is bad now.  It's that it's different data entirely that bears no resemblance to real world usage.  It's sort of like counting "shipped" the same as "sold through to consumers", except it's actually less honest.

post #50 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

 

This is not a sales chart.  It's a chart detailing internet usage.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

 

No it's not. It's a chart of web page hits.

 

You look silly when you try to disagree with me by agreeing with me.

post #51 of 69
WOW! Nokia got almost 28% back to Aug 2012! That's very outstanding! I wonder what Nokia phone people were using.
post #52 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post


Don't waste your time, Timbit is just repeating the same thing in different words that don't even respond to your post. Typical troll technique.

Lol I don't troll. Post my opinion, read others. I try to be fair and unbiased, unlike some here. I prefer Apple products, but I'm not going to become religious and closed minded and only see the world through an Apple filter. If other companies do well, I give them credit where it is due (as long as it was fairly attained). If its Samsung, so be it. If they copied, I'll call them on it.
post #53 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Negafox View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phone-UI-Guy View Post

Um, how is it Nokia is at the top until the start of 2013? This cannot be just smartphones. It would be a very liberal definition of smartphone if it is.
This might shed some light:
http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2482816

That basically says that Nokia is 10th in smartphones. That does make me think these numbers include a bunch of feature phones using WAP and crap like that. They are probably counting Facebook and Twitter access from feature phones.

"Nokia: Its mobile phone share dropped 4.9 percentage points in the first quarter of 2013 mainly due to a steep decline in feature phone sales. Although Nokia’s Windows Phone sales have sequentially improved reaching a volume of 5.1 million units, Nokia is yet to see high growth in the smartphone segment. Nokia’s position in the smartphone market dropped to No. 10 in the first quarter of 2013, from No. 8 in the fourth quarter of 2012."
post #54 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanTiger View Post

 

 

Sorry what devices were left out, the stats were for mobile devices, all iPhone models were included in the study, they even added statistics for the iPod which was the only none phone product listed. As Samsung also makes media devices with internet and weren't present here I would say Apple was more then fairly covered.

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post #55 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by bishop View Post

WOW! Nokia got almost 28% back to Aug 2012! That's very outstanding! I wonder what Nokia phone people were using.

It's the Nokia 520.

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post #56 of 69

The mobile web usage stats are a bit obtuse: mainly because Samsung sell 'phablets' whereas Apple don't. I dare say that if you add ALL iOS sourced web traffic, it still exceeds Samsung's. 

 

Even taking the stats as they are (i.e. flawed methodology which clearly conflates different types of device usage for Samsung and ignores Apple's) it's still fairly stunning that Apple and Samsung are level-pegging, considering that Samsung's product range is so significantly broader. That just one single type of device from Apple commands such usage is a testament to how much better it is.

post #57 of 69

Neither stat source tells the whole story.

 

Among other differences, NetMarketShare only looks at 40,000 websites, mostly in North America, and they only count each visitor once a day.  Meaning that if one user spent two seconds looking at one page on a website, and another spent hours viewing 100 pages on that website, they count as the same "usage".  In other words, it doesn't actually tell us web usage, but only the number of of their rather limited sites visited.

 

StatCounter tracks over 3 million websites, and counts each page view, which is more real life web usage.  Except... the downside of counting page views is that some browsers tend to reload pages a lot within a website, even if just navigating back and forth between a main menu and each page.  That would falsely skew both page and ad views in favor of those browsers.

 

post #58 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

Sorry what devices were left out, the stats were for mobile devices, all iPhone models were included in the study, they even added statistics for the iPod which was the only none phone product listed. As Samsung also makes media devices with internet and weren't present here I would say Apple was more then fairly covered.

 



It left out the iPad and iPad Mini.  Given the massive installed bases those represent for iOS, and the fact that so many are sold with cellular connectivity, it's a bit disingenuous to remove them from the equation and pretend that some other OS has made big gains in web share.  And that doesn't even count people like me that don't have the 3G/4G chip in their iPad but regularly use their iPhones as a 4G hotspot so they can surf the web on their iPad.  While Samsung does make things like the Galaxy Tab, the sales of those are so miniscule compared to the iPad line, leaving those out doesn't really hurt Samsung's numbers.  Plus it's including numbers from those ginormous "phablets" (the Note series) which only makes the omission of the iPad and iPad Mini even more glaring.

 

But really the bigger sin in these meaningless numbers is not properly weighting them for differences in internet usage by country.


Edited by TitanTiger - 7/11/13 at 5:57am
post #59 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Neither stat source tells the whole story.

 

Among other differences, NetMarketShare only looks at 40,000 websites, mostly in North America, and they only count each visitor once a day.  Meaning that if one user spent two seconds looking at one page on a website, and another spent hours viewing 100 pages on that website, they count as the same "usage".  In other words, it doesn't actually tell us web usage, but only the number of of their rather limited sites visited.

 

StatCounter tracks over 3 million websites, and counts each page view, which is more real life web usage.  Except... the downside of counting page views is that some browsers tend to reload pages a lot within a website, even if just navigating back and forth between a main menu and each page.  That would falsely skew both page and ad views in favor of those browsers.

 

 

It is not necessarily true that counting each page view gives more real life web usage stats.  For one thing, the unique visitor per day methodology gives a better picture of how many users you have, uninflated by a handful of heavy users.  Also, it prevents the numbers being fraudulently skewed by bots that just register repeated clicks and page views.  There isn't a perfect methodology because of the nature of the web, but looking at unique visitors rather than page views is a much better metric in this instance.

post #60 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanTiger View Post

But really the bigger sin in these meaningless numbers is not properly weighting them for differences in internet usage by country.

 

Then go ahead.  You have the raw data from StatCounter.  Not sure why you'd want to, since the purpose is to count the ACTUAL usage.

 

In any case, the major factor is that NetMarketShare only counts each visitor once.  That's not showing web usage at all.

 

"Net Market Share data is an aggregation the traffic of all of our HitsLink clients, but instead of counting pageviews we count daily unique visitors. A daily unique visitor is counted only once per day per website we track, regardless of the number of pageviews the visitor has. While this may seem to greatly reduce our sample size from the billions of monthly pageviews we process to only the daily unique visitors, we do so to provide a more accurate picture of market share showing the number of users of a technology instead of the number of clicks."

 

In other words, they're only trying to count OS users, not their actual web usage.

 

To them, someone who clicks on AppleInsider and leaves right away, counts just as much as someone who  spends all day reading every thread.

post #61 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanTiger View Post

 

It is not necessarily true that counting each page view gives more real life web usage stats.  For one thing, the unique visitor per day methodology gives a better picture of how many users you have, uninflated by a handful of heavy users.  Also, it prevents the numbers being fraudulently skewed by bots that just register repeated clicks and page views.  There isn't a perfect methodology because of the nature of the web, but looking at unique visitors rather than page views is a much better metric in this instance.

 

That's all true IF and ONLY IF the purpose is to count unique visitors.

 

We are trying to determine web usage, which requires knowing what those visitors did as far as page views, downloads, etc.

post #62 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanTiger View Post

 



It left out the iPad and iPad Mini.  Given the massive installed bases those represent for iOS, and the fact that so many are sold with cellular connectivity, it's a bit disingenuous to remove them from the equation and pretend that some other OS has made big gains in web share.  And that doesn't even count people like me that don't have the 3G/4G chip in their iPad but regularly use their iPhones as a 4G hotspot so they can surf the web on their iPad.  While Samsung does make things like the Galaxy Tab, the sales of those are so miniscule compared to the iPad line, leaving those out doesn't really hurt Samsung's numbers.  Plus it's including numbers from those ginormous "phablets" (the Note series) which only makes the omission of the iPad and iPad Mini even more glaring.

 

But really the bigger sin in these meaningless numbers is not properly weighting them for differences in internet usage by country.

But their statistics for phones not tablets, I don't understand your objections here.

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post #63 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

But their statistics for phones not tablets, I don't understand your objections here.


It's an artificial parsing of categories, paired with a bad metric to get a wildly different result.  These stats don't tell us more "people" are using Samsung mobile devices to access the web, it tells us that Samsung devices (some of which blur the lines between tablet and phone) managed to accumulate more page hits than a narrow subset of iOS devices (which leaves out a significant portion of the iOS user base).

post #64 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

 

That's all true IF and ONLY IF the purpose is to count unique visitors.

 

We are trying to determine web usage, which requires knowing what those visitors did as far as page views, downloads, etc.

 

The story says:  "A new study has found that more people in the world are using Samsung-made smartphones to access the Internet than are using Apple's iPhone, marking the first time that has been the case."

 

That is not the case.  What it found was that Samsung smartphones and phablets generated more page views than iPhones.  Unique visitors would tell you whether more people were using them.  For all we know, various automated bots could be generating a lot of page views, which is one reason NetMarketShare rejects that methodology.  Or a relatively small subset of users could be heavy web surfers...but that still wouldn't tell you if more actual people were using Samsung mobile devices to surf the web.

post #65 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanTiger View Post

The story says:  "A new study has found that more people in the world are using Samsung-made smartphones to access the Internet than are using Apple's iPhone, marking the first time that has been the case."

 

Ah thanks, you're right.   I got caught up in the other responses about usage.   Mea culpa.

post #66 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yojimbo007 View Post

Bogus.. Samsung bribed article!
As Alawys the low lives are at their game !

Citation needed.

post #67 of 69
Essentially, NetApplications tries to count actual users, while Statcounter tries to count actual usage.
post #68 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

All those trojans spamming the world? 

What I was thinking: all those Android exploit bots obeying their masters....

post #69 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac95 View Post

That rise is due to NSA servers accessing Android devices .

Fixed it for you

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