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iOS 7 Maps go full screen, navigation gets night mode, new Siri options

post #1 of 80
Thread Starter 
Google would like Apple's iOS Maps to go away, but the latest builds of iOS 7 show that Cupertino is working to deliver significant new improvements to its mapping app while also adding deep integration of Maps throughout iOS and with Macs running OS X Mavericks.


OS X Mavericks Maps


Source: Apple


Full Screen Maps



One new feature in Apple Maps, noted by AppleInsider reader Vesko Kateliev, is its full screen mode, which erases all of the user interface chrome to present the largest possible view.

While similar to Safari's full screen view (which hides the URL bar and search fields as users scroll down), iOS 7 Maps takes full screen literally full screen, making even the top status bar disappear. Note too that when scaling the map, a distance legend briefly appears (top left of image on right, below), then vanishes.

iOS 7 Maps full screen
iOS 7 Maps, full screen


The revamped iOS 7 Maps app already expands the apparent field of view by making use of translucency in its search bar and new lower toolbar in both Standard and Satellite or Flyover modes (below).

iOS 7 Maps translucent chrome
iOS 7 Maps, translucent chrome


In either mode however, a purposeful touch of the map makes the UI go away entirely. Pinching or dragging a finger across the screen doesn't hide or show the UI chrome; you have to touch the map to take it full screen, and it says full screen until you deliberately tap the map again.

Full screen mode works with standard, satellite or hybrid maps in either 2D or 3D, allowing you to peruse maps using all the pixels you have.

More brilliant chrome



Apple has also enhanced the chrome itself. Across the top, the Directions button works the same as previously, offering driving, walking or transit routes (which continues to make use of helper apps, as it does in iOS 6).

The Search field also works as expected, although Apple now auto-suggests locations it has highlighted in recent emails or messages (below) via Apple Data Detectors. Bookmarks is unchanged, except for gaining the new iOS 7 appearance.

ADD iOS 7


At the bottom of the screen, rather than just presenting Location and 3D/Flyover buttons and hiding other options behind a dogeared corner, Maps now presents a toolbar with four buttons: Location, 3D/Flyover, Sharing, and an Info button that brings up an options sheet.

Location & Compass



Each of these has changed slightly. For example, the Location button loses its former purple tint when activated; it now just turns solid to indicate your current location, and points upward to show you're in compass mode.

iOS 7 Maps, location & compass
iOS 7 Maps, location & compass


While in compass mode, Maps also now presents a compass indicator with an N for north, rather than the more abstract double arrow with a red end pointing north. As previously, touching the compass sets the map orientation to North and it disappears.

3D/Flyover



The 3D/Flyover button also works the same as it does in iOS 6, entering a 3D perspective view of the map when touched in either Standard or Satellite/Hybrid mode.

You can also enter 3D mode with a two fingered, vertical drag gesture, but providing the button makes it easier and more evident how to jump into this mode, if you're not aware of the necessary gesture to invoke it.

iOS 7 Maps, Flyover
iOS 7 Maps, Flyover label


However, in iOS 7 it now pops up a "Flyover" text label when you are in satellite mode and at a zoom level and in a region where you can enter Flyover (above), making the feature more obvious and prominent. Flyover looks particularly cool in Full Screen mode.

Sharing & Bookmarking



A prominent new Sharing button brings up the standard iOS 7 share sheet, with options to share a location via AirDrop, Messages, Mail, Twitter or Facebook or to add a Bookmark.

iOS 7 Maps, Sharing
iOS 7 Maps, Sharing


Emailing a location involves sending a maps.apple.com URL with its coordinates, something that opens in Apple's Maps on iOS or OS X Mavericks, or for web-based users, resolves to a Google Maps URL they can look up.

An emailed location also attaches a "loc.vcf" vCard file, which is a small, standard structured file that includes the same coordinates, sort of like a contact record that only supplies a GPS location.

If you've looked up Directions to a location, iOS 7 Maps also offers to share the directions to a nearby friend via AirDrop.

Previously, you could only share a location in iOS 6 Maps by selecting a pin, opening its info page, clicking on share location to open another sheet, and then selecting one of the sharing options.

Location Information



Replacing the whimsical dogeared corner of previous incarnations of the Maps apps, Apple now uses an information button to pop up options for switching between Standard, Hybrid and Satellite views or to Drop a Pin, Print Map via AirPrint, Report a Problem and Show/Hide traffic.

iOS 7 Maps Info, Yelp
iOS 7 Maps, Info & Yelp


If you select a pin representing a location known to Yelp, you get the same information presented in iOS 6, including business contact info, Yelp reviews and photos; hours of operation; delivery, reservations and kid-friendly notes; and options to create a contact, bookmark or report problems.

New in iOS 7, apart from a clearer presentation, is a default link to transit directions and a the "popular apps nearby" feature, which links to location-relevant apps. This is particularly helpful in places where the establishment has a custom app, or there are site-specific apps in common use, for example, the Uber car service in San Francisco.

Directions preferences, options



Maps includes a new preference in Settings for "Preferred Directions," letting you choose the default between Driving or Walking. If you pick the latter, locations you select will get the walking man icon rather than the car for one touch walking directions.

iOS 7 Maps Settings
iOS 7 Maps, Direction defaults


Once you enter directions mode, the same Route Overview button (now in the lower toolbar next to the Sharing button) presents you with step by step directions, albeit with more precise directional icons rather than the more cartoony, "road sign" style arrows of iOS 6.

The same, simpler direction panels are presented along your route in place of the former green roadsigns with highway style skeuomorphism. While giving directions, Maps also now presents the estimated trip duration, remaining distance and arrival time at the top of the display as well as on the Lock Screen, so you don't have to do the math in your head.

iOS 7 Maps, Direction signs
iOS 7 Maps, Direction Signs


Another nice improvement in directions is that you can now zoom out further and pan around more while in GPS directions mode; iOS 6 locked the presentation into a very constrained view that often made it hard to see where the next turn would be.

In iOS 7, you can interact with the map via pinching to see around corners and spy out the landscape ahead, then pop back into "you are here" mode where you are centered in the map and and north is up. This still prevents you from navigating out to a "lost" zoom location where you have to manually zoom back into your current location.

You can also control the volume of Siri voice controls right within the app. While the main Siri volume preference is in Settings, a new volume button lets you change the relative volume of Siri's voice feedback independently of the system volume, so it doesn't shout too loud over your background music, for example.

iOS 7 Maps Settings
iOS 7 Maps, Direction defaults


There's also a new Night Mode that automatically activates when you're driving in the dark. It presents a darker grey background rather than a bright white map, similar to many auto navigation systems.

System integration



Rather than just replacing Google Maps with its own service, Apple is using its new mapping services throughout iOS 7 and OS X Mavericks to provide map previews of locations in apps like Mail, Contacts and Calendar, drawing upon traffic information to calculate travel time to an appointment, for example.




Source: Apple


Lastly, iOS 7 Maps also features new integration with OS X Mavericks, allowing users to send locations and directions to their iOS 7 device via a push notification. Apple's new Maps app for Macs also feature expanded error reporting tools to leverage crowdsourcing in order to improve its mapping service, search results, location information and directions
post #2 of 80
love the transparency of the chrome over vector maps. A bit gray/muddy over the flyover and sat views. Either way ios7 is looking really nice
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post #3 of 80
It sounds like Apple Maps is really shaping up to be a really good tool!
post #4 of 80

That's all well and good, but the interface Maps has (on iOS) is already impressive.  The problem is the search facility is awful.  It's taken me to places that don't exist so many times that I only use Google Maps now.

 

In terms of the version for the Mac, having just started using a new beta of Google Maps in a browser, Apple have a fight on their hands here.  The new Google Maps is very impressive.

post #5 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by dugbug View Post

love the transparency of the chrome over vector maps. A bit gray/muddy over the flyover and sat views. Either way ios7 is looking really nice

Agreed. I think it's shaping up to be something really nice. There was a great article in the Next Web about how iOS 7 is designed for future customers.

http://thenextweb.com/apple/2013/07/10/ios-7-is-designed-for-apples-next-billion-customers/
post #6 of 80
Sounds good, but they will still be almost useless to those of use without cars or those of us that live in cities outside of the USA.

Maps needs transit information, bike route information, and proper walking directions to be useful to anyone who doesn't drive a car. It has none of these at the moment and based on this review is not adding them to the product this year either.

It's great to have the new default walking setting, because doing the route, changing it to walking instead of the current default to cars, and then having to re-route a second time gets old really fast. Unfortunately, the "walking" directions are not really walking directions at all, but merely car directions with a longer time frame noted in the "how long ail it take" part. For instance in most non-american cities, cars are actively slowed down and "calmed" by means of blockades and "no through" routes. An intersection of two streets is often turned into two "L" turns so that cars can only turn one way, but people can easily walk through this same intersection. Apple maps ail route you blocks out of your way on walking directions because it takes intersections like this and assumes that if a car can't get through, then a person can't either.

Also, in most non US cities, there are extensive bike routes where cars are not allowed, but Apple maps makes no mention of these at all. Transit routes also aren't marked at all in my city despite it being the third largest metropolitan area in Canada. Rapid transit stations are noted but are literally several blocks from where they actually are. The boundaries of parks are still off by blocks, despite being reported multiple times. It's just a dog's breakfast of bad information that isn't updated frequently enough.

I have dozens of friends who have regularly submitted corrections and updates to Apple maps since day one, myself included and have yet to see a single one of these actually make it to the map. This is a very large, urban metropolitan area in North America. I pity someone who lives in some more far flung place.

They either shouldn't have taken on maps at all, or they should do it right. Google has thousands of employees around the world who's only task is to update this information. I would be surprised if Apple's maps team is even as large as the app store submission team and we know how small that group is don't we?
post #7 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

That's all well and good, but the interface Maps has (on iOS) is already impressive.  The problem is the search facility is awful.  It's taken me to places that don't exist so many times that I only use Google Maps now.

In terms of the version for the Mac, having just started using a new beta of Google Maps in a browser, Apple have a fight on their hands here.  The new Google Maps is very impressive.

Agreed.

I need concrete proof Apple has improved Maps DATA with this release and not just the LOOK.

As you said Maps looks great but we need improved data as well as directions. Maybe Apple should partner with MapQuest or even Yahoo but the ways I've gotten lost with Maps is unacceptable.

I cannot trust the app to be my default app after last week when I used it to give me directions to a county library and instead I ended up at a trailer park in the wrong part of town. Unacceptable. I had to use Google to get me to the right place.
post #8 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

That's all well and good, but the interface Maps has (on iOS) is already impressive.  The problem is the search facility is awful.  It's taken me to places that don't exist so many times that I only use Google Maps now.

In terms of the version for the Mac, having just started using a new beta of Google Maps in a browser, Apple have a fight on their hands here.  The new Google Maps is very impressive.
Yeah I think Apple still has a lot of work to do on the data size. But I think they need to double down on it. I don't think a world where Google dominates everything is good.
post #9 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Yeah I think Apple still has a lot of work to do on the data size. But I think they need to double down on it. I don't think a world where Google dominates everything is good.

There were many great mapping companies before Google.

Why didn't Apple partner or buy one of those companies? Even Yahoo has been in the mapping game far longer than Google. Why doesn't Apple announce a partnership with them just like they have with Yahoo Weather?

What about MapQuest? Garmin? Rand McNally? AAA? Hell even Microsoft?

I'm sure there are more out there that Apple could use to improve their product. I'd really like to hear an announcement or a partnership on that front this fall.
post #10 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Sounds good, but they will still be almost useless to those of use without cars or those of us that live in cities outside of the USA.

Maps needs transit information, bike route information, and proper walking directions to be useful to anyone who doesn't drive a car. It has none of these at the moment and based on this review is not adding them to the product this year either.

It's great to have the new default walking setting, because doing the route, changing it to walking instead of the current default to cars, and then having to re-route a second time gets old really fast. Unfortunately, the "walking" directions are not really walking directions at all, but merely car directions with a longer time frame noted in the "how long ail it take" part. For instance in most non-american cities, cars are actively slowed down and "calmed" by means of blockades and "no through" routes. An intersection of two streets is often turned into two "L" turns so that cars can only turn one way, but people can easily walk through this same intersection. Apple maps ail route you blocks out of your way on walking directions because it takes intersections like this and assumes that if a car can't get through, then a person can't either.

Also, in most non US cities, there are extensive bike routes where cars are not allowed, but Apple maps makes no mention of these at all. Transit routes also aren't marked at all in my city despite it being the third largest metropolitan area in Canada. Rapid transit stations are noted but are literally several blocks from where they actually are. The boundaries of parks are still off by blocks, despite being reported multiple times. It's just a dog's breakfast of bad information that isn't updated frequently enough.

I have dozens of friends who have regularly submitted corrections and updates to Apple maps since day one, myself included and have yet to see a single one of these actually make it to the map. This is a very large, urban metropolitan area in North America. I pity someone who lives in some more far flung place.

They either shouldn't have taken on maps at all, or they should do it right. Google has thousands of employees around the world who's only task is to update this information. I would be surprised if Apple's maps team is even as large as the app store submission team and we know how small that group is don't we?

 

Your copy and paste routine has some issues. First off, Apple Maps aren't restricted to working in the US. I've driven across Europe with them. They work better than Google's when you're working offline, including when you roam into a country where you don't have data service. Apple's vectors continue to work a very long ways without service, while Google's vectors simply don't, and I don't think Google's iOS app supports offline maps yet, making the problem worse to impossible. 

 

Google has some strong search advantages, and has better maps in some places, but it just lost the majority of half of all smarpthones in iOS 6. Apple now has a premium user installed base, so guess whose maps are going to get better, faster? Google also throws up ads in your maps app, which sucks balls. 

 

Apple has better transit routing via local third party apps. Google's simply don't work or don't work well in many major cities. Time to stop beating that horse.

 

And saying that biking directions are super critical is rather silly too. There are plenty of bike routing apps for iOS. Walking directions in iOS 6 work fine. 

 

The rest of your assumptions are simple inventions. You know nothing about how the App Store or how Apple's Maps group work, how they are staffed, and what they are doing. 

post #11 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Sounds good, but they will still be almost useless to those of use without cars or those of us that live in cities outside of the USA.

Maps needs transit information, bike route information, and proper walking directions to be useful to anyone who doesn't drive a car. It has none of these at the moment and based on this review is not adding them to the product this year either.

It's great to have the new default walking setting, because doing the route, changing it to walking instead of the current default to cars, and then having to re-route a second time gets old really fast. Unfortunately, the "walking" directions are not really walking directions at all, but merely car directions with a longer time frame noted in the "how long ail it take" part. For instance in most non-american cities, cars are actively slowed down and "calmed" by means of blockades and "no through" routes. An intersection of two streets is often turned into two "L" turns so that cars can only turn one way, but people can easily walk through this same intersection. Apple maps ail route you blocks out of your way on walking directions because it takes intersections like this and assumes that if a car can't get through, then a person can't either.

Also, in most non US cities, there are extensive bike routes where cars are not allowed, but Apple maps makes no mention of these at all. Transit routes also aren't marked at all in my city despite it being the third largest metropolitan area in Canada. Rapid transit stations are noted but are literally several blocks from where they actually are. The boundaries of parks are still off by blocks, despite being reported multiple times. It's just a dog's breakfast of bad information that isn't updated frequently enough.

I have dozens of friends who have regularly submitted corrections and updates to Apple maps since day one, myself included and have yet to see a single one of these actually make it to the map. This is a very large, urban metropolitan area in North America. I pity someone who lives in some more far flung place.

They either shouldn't have taken on maps at all, or they should do it right. Google has thousands of employees around the world who's only task is to update this information. I would be surprised if Apple's maps team is even as large as the app store submission team and we know how small that group is don't we?

As great as Jobs was he just didn't get services AT ALL and didn't invest the resources in to it. I hope Cook is doubling down on investments in services. I'd rather not use Google services if I don't have to. So far maps have been working fine for me but I know a lot of people do have issues.
post #12 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post


There were many great mapping companies before Google.

Why didn't Apple partner or buy one of those companies? Even Yahoo has been in the mapping game far longer than Google. Why doesn't Apple announce a partnership with them just like they have with Yahoo Weather?

What about MapQuest? Garmin? Rand McNally? AAA? Hell even Microsoft?

I'm sure there are more out there that Apple could use to improve their product. I'd really like to hear an announcement or a partnership on that front this fall.

 

This is comical. Apple entered the market and suddenly is ahead of everyone in users and extremely competitive with Nokia and Google in features. 

 

But yeah, why didn't they just sell AAA maps. What a joke.

post #13 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

There were many great mapping companies before Google.

Why didn't Apple partner or buy one of those companies? Even Yahoo has been in the mapping game far longer than Google. Why doesn't Apple announce a partnership with them just like they have with Yahoo Weather?

What about MapQuest? Garmin? Rand McNally? AAA? Hell even Microsoft?

I'm sure there are more out there that Apple could use to improve their product. I'd really like to hear an announcement or a partnership on that front this fall.
I don't care how Apple does it or who they partner with. Someone needs to stop the Google domination and provide some real competition.
post #14 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post


Agreed.

I need concrete proof Apple has improved Maps DATA with this release and not just the LOOK.

As you said Maps looks great but we need improved data as well as directions. Maybe Apple should partner with MapQuest or even Yahoo but the ways I've gotten lost with Maps is unacceptable.

I cannot trust the app to be my default app after last week when I used it to give me directions to a county library and instead I ended up at a trailer park in the wrong part of town. Unacceptable. I had to use Google to get me to the right place.

 

So use Google Maps. Apple doesn't stop you, and you can even launch them from Siri as desired. It's not like you're on Android and have no choice for maps.

post #15 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

This is comical. Apple entered the market and suddenly is ahead of everyone in users and extremely competitive with Nokia and Google in features. 

But yeah, why didn't they just sell AAA maps. What a joke.

When did having the most users equal quality?

So I'm guessing you think Internet Explorer is the most competitive web browser because they've been ahead of everyone in users for decades right?
post #16 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by dugbug View Post

love the transparency of the chrome over vector maps. A bit gray/muddy over the flyover and sat views. Either way ios7 is looking really nice

The whole interface seems very gray and muddy in my opinion. Gray text on a gray background is just a bad idea. I'd prefer more contrast, especially with small text. Sure I can read it if I wear my reading glasses, but that is not always possible because you can't wear reading glasses with a 16" focal length while driving or even walking around. I don't need glasses for focusing at longer lengths because I'm far-sighted, although I can read the text on my built-in navigation system just fine without glasses. Often I find myself wishing I could zoom and pan within iOS apps but they are all fixed. Even in the Maps app where you can zoom, the text immediately shrinks down too small.

 

According to the Vision Council of America, approximately 75% of adults use some sort of vision correction. About 60% of Americans are far-sighted; they have trouble reading or sewing without glasses, but can focus well at a distance.    

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post #17 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

 

So use Google Maps. Apple doesn't stop you, and you can even launch them from Siri as desired. It's not like you're on Android and have no choice for maps.

 

For how much you hate Android you sure don't seem to know much about it (or willing to do even a basic search to see if your baseless claims have merit).

post #18 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

So use Google Maps. Apple doesn't stop you, and you can even launch them from Siri as desired. It's not like you're on Android and have no choice for maps.

I'd prefer to use an Apple product considering I'm on an Apple device and not a Google device.

I simply don't want Apple to focus on beautifying an already great looking App, while overlooking Maps' real problems (and they are many).

I don't think I'd be the only one rejoicing if Apple announced some major improvements to Maps data or a major partnership this fall. The app desperately needs it to be competitive.
post #19 of 80
@PaulMJohnson, Google Maps has sent me on so many wild goose chases and given me wrong directions so many times that I won't use it. It's showed me that I've arrived at a private residence while I'm in the middle of a parking lot. It's given me directions to businesses that don't exist. It's taken me miles out of my way to get to a location.

What you described (and what I repeatedly experienced), however, is just anecdotal evidence, not acceptable scientific proof of any kind of superiority. The plain fact is that Google Maps and Apple Maps are both works in progress. However, it's well established that Google takes your searches and markets the information about you. If you want even more loss of privacy and the possibility of losing credit, jobs, insurance, and more, that's up to you. By all means use Google Maps. Personally, I also like MapQuest.
post #20 of 80
I'm surprised that Apple didn't include a GPS chip in the MBA while pushing maps into OS X.
post #21 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

 

So use Google Maps. Apple doesn't stop you, and you can even launch them from Siri as desired. It's not like you're on Android and have no choice for maps.

That's such a lazy argument.  It basically boils down to, if you don't slavishly think Apple are perfect, don't have an opinion, just change to something else.

 

I happen to not think Google Maps is perfect.  I think the interface, when compared with Apple Maps, is a pile of shit.  Nokia's offering (Here Maps) has some plusses and minuses as well.

 

However, the opinion I'm airing is that if I had my druthers, Apple would sort out the search, since I'd like to be able to use their mapping tool, but as it stands, it's sent me to the wrong place too many times.  Rather than just writing it off though, as you would have me do, I'm hoping Apple might fix the problems.  I like Apples products, and Apple as a company, enough to want them to beat the competition.

post #22 of 80
What I would like is a map editor where I can report map issues around my neighborhood. Love the changes though. Using openstreetmap editor is a pain.
post #23 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

I need concrete proof Apple has improved Maps DATA with this release and not just the LOOK.

i look forward to your in-depth unbiased analysis ...
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post #24 of 80
Apple demonstrates once again just how far ahead they are of Google Maps.
post #25 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Google would like Apple's iOS Maps to go away, but the latest builds of iOS 7 show that Cupertino is working to deliver significant new improvements to its mapping app while also adding deep integration of Maps throughout iOS and with Macs running OS X Mavericks.
 

 

That's great. I really like some of the features Maps already has and will get with iOS7 and Mavericks.

 

Shame they won't do me a damn bit of good since the information it supplies, or more accurately, DOESN'T supply, makes the entire app useless to me.

 

I live in Vancouver (the Canadian one, not the one in Washington). For some reason I thought this might be the kind of non-USA place Apple would want to focus on, because it's one of the small handful of Canadian cities visited by bajillions of Americans every year. I guess I was wrong.

 

As recently as a few weeks ago I entered the address of an appliance store that has been in the same location for 20+ years. Apple Maps responded with "No such address exists" or something similar. Google Maps found it.

 

Then last week I was trying to show a news camera crew the location of a major fire. Not only could Apple Maps not find the address, when I entered an address on the next street over, the map that came up didn't even show the existence of the street we wanted. There was empty space where the street should have been.

 

I know it's fashionable to bash Apple Maps these days, but I'd much rather sing its praises. I WANT it to work, because it has so many potential advantages over Google. Sadly, it just doesn't.

post #26 of 80
Looks great! I love the way Night Mode looks.

I never before thought about the fact that a simple single tap in Maps does nothing at all. So... use it for toggling fullscreen? Makes sense to me.
post #27 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

 

For how much you hate Android you sure don't seem to know much about it (or willing to do even a basic search to see if your baseless claims have merit).

 

There's no Apple Maps for Android. So if you want to roam offline without dealing with Google's wonky offline map saving and/or don't like ads, you're SOL. 

 

I also like Apple Maps' touch navigation more. Google Maps and particularly Google Earth are awkward to navigate. The new Google Maps on the web/desktop taxes a fast computer, and is still much lower quality than iOS Maps in 3D images.

 

Both have big strengths and significant weaknesses, so being able to use either on iOS is a plus. Being left to use only Google's Maps on Android (and even worse support from third parties) on Android is not a feature. 

post #28 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

 

That's great. I really like some of the features Maps already has and will get with iOS7 and Mavericks.

 

Shame they won't do me a damn bit of good since the information it supplies, or more accurately, DOESN'T supply, makes the entire app useless to me.

 

I live in Vancouver (the Canadian one, not the one in Washington). For some reason I thought this might be the kind of non-USA place Apple would want to focus on, because it's one of the small handful of Canadian cities visited by bajillions of Americans every year. I guess I was wrong.

 

As recently as a few weeks ago I entered the address of an appliance store that has been in the same location for 20+ years. Apple Maps responded with "No such address exists" or something similar. Google Maps found it.

 

Then last week I was trying to show a news camera crew the location of a major fire. Not only could Apple Maps not find the address, when I entered an address on the next street over, the map that came up didn't even show the existence of the street we wanted. There was empty space where the street should have been.

 

I know it's fashionable to bash Apple Maps these days, but I'd much rather sing its praises. I WANT it to work, because it has so many potential advantages over Google. Sadly, it just doesn't.

 

The quality of Apple's Maps in terms of POI & search is largely dependent upon the data partners Apple is relying upon. There are lots of errors everywhere, whether govt data, companies like Yelp (often addresses are wrong, even of popular places) or other map data vendors. But you know what? I've ran into similar major errors with Google Maps, even in major cities where you'd think popular places would be located correctly. Global maps is a huge task. It's going to take more than one year to reach perfection. 

 

People's standards are far higher for Apple, so the reported anecdotes are obviously not flattering to Apple's newer product. All of its advantages are assumed & taken for granted or ignored, while every superior element of Google's is highlighted and its flaws are ignored. 

post #29 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

That's such a lazy argument.  It basically boils down to, if you don't slavishly think Apple are perfect, don't have an opinion, just change to something else.

 

I happen to not think Google Maps is perfect.  I think the interface, when compared with Apple Maps, is a pile of shit.  Nokia's offering (Here Maps) has some plusses and minuses as well.

 

However, the opinion I'm airing is that if I had my druthers, Apple would sort out the search, since I'd like to be able to use their mapping tool, but as it stands, it's sent me to the wrong place too many times.  Rather than just writing it off though, as you would have me do, I'm hoping Apple might fix the problems.  I like Apples products, and Apple as a company, enough to want them to beat the competition.

 

So it's a "less lazy" argument to simply complain that Apple doesn't impress you enough with its first party offerings? I do not follow. 

 

The reality is that Apple just launched a brand new product one year ago and is not far behind Nokia and Google (who have been leading maps for several years). Compare Apple's position in maps to Microsoft's position with WP: that platform is now three years old and hasn't made a dent. Apple just jumped into the #2 spot for mobile maps. 

 

I agree that Apple's interface is superior and its search/POI is not. But I think there's more value in a) reporting this and b) laying out options for users than in idly complaining that Apple's Maps aren't dripping with gold perfection and that there are still competitors with some advantages one year into the battle.

 

That seems like the lazy argument to me. Really, the only argument, because I don't think I'm arguing, but rather just outlining facts. 

post #30 of 80
As long as Maps still doesn't support adding vias (waypoints) for a route, I will still have need of my Garmin. I've seen nothing that says such support is coming in iOS 7.
post #31 of 80

Forcing users to seek out and download a new transit app and deal with a new map interface every time they travel to a new city is the opposite of "It Just Works".

post #32 of 80

I haven't used Apple maps in a while because I really haven't been anywhere that I needed any navigation app. I am excited to hear about all these new advances and improvements. I knew when Tim Cook issued that apology about a year ago that Apple would make massive improvements very rapidly and that seems to be the case. I know this would never happen, but what if Apple decided to release Apple Maps for Android and even Windows and Blackberry and it became the most popular mapping service for them as well. I know Apple like to keep most things Apple only but iTunes sure made them a bundle on Windows. If Apple ever rakes in big money from Maps who knows and it could also be a huge FU to Google.  

 

Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. 

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Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. 

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post #33 of 80
Finally, night node! 1smile.gif

The best app I ever bought was TomTom ($35). AppleMaps is better except apple didn't have night node
post #34 of 80
So glad they added night mode. It's a must have in the car.
post #35 of 80
Mmm... When you authorize/logon to the iOS 7 and Mac OSX Mavericks Developer system, you have to sign an NDA that limits what you can discuss and publish about Apple's pre-release products.

Isn't DED / Corrections bound by the NDA?
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post #36 of 80
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

... a distance legend briefly appears ...

 

Yay!!!

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post #37 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by ny3ranger View Post

What I would like is a map editor where I can report map issues around my neighborhood. Love the changes though. Using openstreetmap editor is a pain.

 

As I see it the main problem with map data is that there are numerous competing companies each with their own data sets. I believe eventually some official entity needs to take charge of this much like the US invented the Internet and took charge of the DNS naming system. The Internet would be totally unreliable if competing companies were in charge of different versions of DNS. These disparate map data sets in various offerings are creating a redundant and often conflicting source of unofficial information.

 

U.S. Geological Survey, National Ocean Service and International Occultation Timing Association are official sources for topographical maps, oceanic data and astronomical data, but there needs to be an official department with current satellite, low altitude imagery, landmarks, businesses locations and postal addresses that all mapping companies can use as their foundation and the differentiation would be in the presentation only but the underlying data would be from a single official source. That way if there was a mistake that needed to be corrected it would be done at a single location. It would work just like modern day relational database design or OOP programming - Never have duplicate data in different places. It will screw you every time.

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post #38 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ny3ranger View Post

What I would like is a map editor where I can report map issues around my neighborhood. Love the changes though. Using openstreetmap editor is a pain.

As I see it the main problem with map data is that there are numerous competing companies each with their own data sets. I believe eventually some official entity needs to take charge of this much like the US invented the Internet and took charge of the DNS naming system. The Internet would be totally unreliable if competing companies were in charge of different versions of DNS. These disparate map data sets in various offerings are creating a redundant and often conflicting source of unofficial information.

U.S. Geological Survey, National Ocean Service and International Occultation Timing Association are official sources for topographical maps, oceanic data and astronomical data, but there needs to be an official department with current satellite, low altitude imagery, landmarks, businesses locations and postal addresses that all mapping companies can use as their foundation and the differentiation would be in the presentation only but the underlying data would be from a single official source. That way if there was a mistake that needed to be corrected it would be done at a single location. It would work just like modern day relational database design or OOP programming - Never have duplicate data in different places. It will screw you every time.

I agree!

Idealistically, I would think that the United Nations Organization should be the responsible body...

Realistically, I think that the US Government (slightly less corrupt) is a better choice.


As for locating/reporting errors -- with a common maps database, the various maps providers could provide mobile, web and desktop tools to do this.

Currently. Google Maps on the web appears to be the most robust tool for searching/editing maps... However the web UI is not the best for certain mapping operations.

I suspect that Apple will expand its OSX and iOS maps offerings to add things like waypoints, track points, etc. -- and eventually offer a web version.
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post #39 of 80

I agree with the other posters -- the issue with Apple Maps is not its features or interface, but the underlying data.  The street data has improved, and the turn-by-turn directions IMO are now superior to the results I get from Google.  But, the business location data remains a mess.  It's all well and good that Apple has improved the interface for reporting errors, but what good does that do if the reported errors don't get fixed? 

 

I've used Apple Maps on my iPad since December, and immediately flagged several problems with business locations in my neighborhood and close to my office.  To date, only one of these errors has been corrected, and that did not happen until last month.  These errors might not originate with Apple.  But, shifting blame does not solve the problem, and end users don't care who supplied the data or how many hands it might have passed through before it wound up on the Apple Maps app.  All that matters is that a lot of errors do show up on the app, and large numbers of them don't get corrected. 

 

Yes, Google Maps also has a lot of errors with the business location data, but in my experience, they also update and correct the data more frequently.  I would much prefer to not use Google's maps at all, but as long as Apple continues to offer up an incomplete alternative, I have no choice but to continue using Google Maps for certain queries. 

post #40 of 80
Very cool, but Apple still needs a default preference for preferring NON toll-road routes.

Lastly, Apple still needs to work on location accuracy of businesses and restaurants! Google Maps is mostly spot-on, but Apple's are severely lacking more times than I would expect... 1rolleyes.gif
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