or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Microsoft releases native Outlook Web Apps for iPhone, iPad
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Microsoft releases native Outlook Web Apps for iPhone, iPad

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 
Microsoft on Tuesday launched its official Outlook Web App mail applications on the iOS App Store, with separate downloads optimized for both Apple's iPhone and iPad.

OWA


OWA for iPhone and OWA for iPad are both available to download for free, providing users with a native Outlook Web App experience on iOS devices. In order to use the app, users must subscribe to Office 365 and have the latest update of Exchange Online.

AppleInsider was first to report last year that Microsoft was working on a native version of Outlook Web App for iOS. As expected, the new application uses the same tiled "Metro" interface found on Microsoft's other platforms, such as Windows 8 and Windows Phone.

Outlook Web App for iOS requires an iPhone 4, iPad 2 or newer running iOS 6 or higher. Using OWA on iOS does not incur an additional charge for Office 365 subscribers.

OWA


Features of the application, as highlighted by Microsoft, include:
  • Organize your email quickly with Conversation View, Mark as Junk, Flag, and Categories
  • Quickly search or browse email in all folders including Outlook Favorites
  • Manage your schedule with ease
  • Schedule meetings using attendee free/busy and room finder
  • View shared calendars including delegate support
  • Use your voice to look up a contact or bring up your schedule
    Keep business data secure
  • Remote wipe erases only your corporate data in OWA for iPad and leaves your personal data on the device alone
  • Separate passcode for OWA for iPad provides an additional layer of security

Both OWA for iPhone and OWA for iPad are 11.1-megabyte downloads.
post #2 of 42
Native Web Apps? WTH?

Web Apps are not native, even if they are downloadable.
post #3 of 42
Sad thing for Microsoft is that nobody cares.
post #4 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post

Native Web Apps? WTH?

Web Apps are not native, even if they are downloadable.


Well...

Mail, Voice search/dictation, Maps, Web Browsers and such "native" apps rely on a web server component -- so the distinction is a little bit fuzzy.

The first native iPhone app I wrote was an app that streamed Music Videos from a web server -- it was coded in Xcode, Installed on the iPhone, downloaded, then cached images and text descriptions of the Music Video files on startup. When the user selected a video, it would stream it from the web site...

I would certainly consider it to be a "native" iPhone app.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
post #5 of 42
I wonder if the NSA could do a spellcheck when they are going through your emails from this app.
It would be rude if they graded it though....
"F for grammar? C'mon!"
..... the greatest fame comes from adding to human knowledge, not winning battles.
Paraphrased from Napolean Bonaparte, 1798
Reply
..... the greatest fame comes from adding to human knowledge, not winning battles.
Paraphrased from Napolean Bonaparte, 1798
Reply
post #6 of 42
If I have to pay, it's a fail.
post #7 of 42
edit: my bad, I need to learn to read better.
It's only after you've lost everything that you're free to do anything.

Tyler Durden | Fight Club
Reply
It's only after you've lost everything that you're free to do anything.

Tyler Durden | Fight Club
Reply
post #8 of 42
Great, NSA approved email!
post #9 of 42

I buy software, I don't rent software.

 

Therefore there is no chance that I will be renting my access to MS Office (and for the same reason, I won't be renting the latest Adobe offerings either).

 

At some point, when all the other platforms are making people pay monthly or annually for continued access to their own data, then Apple (which seems to know how to do this properly, by augmenting their purchasable offerings with cloud facilities, rather than forcing you into the cloud) will clean up big time.

post #10 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


Well...

Mail, Voice search/dictation, Maps, Web Browsers and such "native" apps rely on a web server component -- so the distinction is a little bit fuzzy.

The first native iPhone app I wrote was an app that streamed Music Videos from a web server -- it was coded in Xcode, Installed on the iPhone, downloaded, then cached images and text descriptions of the Music Video files on startup. When the user selected a video, it would stream it from the web site...

I would certainly consider it to be a "native" iPhone app.

 

Nice save, but I think whomever wrote the headline just f*cked up.  1smile.gif 

 

If it's "native" it isn't a "web app" by definition. 

post #11 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


Well...

Mail, Voice search/dictation, Maps, Web Browsers and such "native" apps rely on a web server component -- so the distinction is a little bit fuzzy.

The first native iPhone app I wrote was an app that streamed Music Videos from a web server -- it was coded in Xcode, Installed on the iPhone, downloaded, then cached images and text descriptions of the Music Video files on startup. When the user selected a video, it would stream it from the web site...

I would certainly consider it to be a "native" iPhone app.

 

The distinction really isn't that fuzzy.  Most native apps have some sort of server component.  However, a Web app is something where the code is server based, except for the code delivered as HTML/CSS/Javascript or other web browser capable technologies.

 

On the iOS, it's simple... can it be run in Safari? If yes, then it's a Web app and not a Native App.  Is it in the iTunes Store, or Cydia?  If yes, then it's a Native App and not a Web App.

 

That's a pretty distinct differentiation that works well and is generally accepted.  See Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_app

 

If one changes that definition to mean that web apps are native apps that have X amount of interaction with a server, then there's no point in using the term.

post #12 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


Well...

Mail, Voice search/dictation, Maps, Web Browsers and such "native" apps rely on a web server component -- so the distinction is a little bit fuzzy.

The first native iPhone app I wrote was an app that streamed Music Videos from a web server -- it was coded in Xcode, Installed on the iPhone, downloaded, then cached images and text descriptions of the Music Video files on startup. When the user selected a video, it would stream it from the web site...

I would certainly consider it to be a "native" iPhone app.

 

Naturally what you characterise as native app is accurate.

 

However, whether an app is native or not, is not defined by the content it provides or accesses, since most apps these days pull content from the web or push it there. And yes, even a web browser is a native app. :)

 

The distinction is to be made by the underlying technologies. A native app is compiled into architecture specific machine code, whereas a web app is composed of web technologies, such as HTML, CSS, Javascript and/or other markup and interpreted languages. Those apps do not run standalone and require a specific environment, such as a web browser in order to run. Your iCloud Mail or Calendar are classic examples of web apps.

 

At this point this might get a bit confusing, but web apps may also run without being connected to the internet and they may run without having to explicitly open a web browser. In fact, there are many (often cheapish in appearance) iOS apps that are in fact web apps, simply packaged as an app and thus made downloadable through the app store. However, the underlying technology would not be native at all, merely the packaging. As such, the app would consist of a raw, native frame with a UIWebView, which is basically an embeddable WebKit component developers may use in their apps. All further app content would be written using web technologies, user interfaces would be rendered using HTML and CSS and so on.

 

That's what I meant when referring to web apps, and even though they might be packaged into standalone app frames, you can hardly call those apps native. In fact, Facebook has been using such web technologies within its official app until very recently, when they made the switch to native, simply because performance was too poor before.

 

Consequently, I stand by what I said: the headline is very confusing. :)

post #13 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by macslut View Post

 

On the iOS, it's simple... can it be run in Safari? If yes, then it's a Web app and not a Native App.  Is it in the iTunes Store, or Cydia?  If yes, then it's a Native App and not a Web App.

 

I would disagree with this statement. As described in my example above, it is very easy to package a web app into a frame which is basically nothing else than an embedded web browser component in order to make it available through the App Store or Cydia for that matter. In fact most "build your own app without knowing how to code" websites do it this way.

post #14 of 42
Was going to download new App for my old hotmail account but looks like Microsoft would require me to buy their lates OS
post #15 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Everett Ruess View Post

Was going to download new App for my old hotmail account but looks like Microsoft would require me to buy their lates OS

I don't get this post, are you saying because the iOS Hotmail interface looks like the version found in Metro this somehow makes your entire iPad a Microsoft OS?
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
Reply
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
Reply
post #16 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post

 

I would disagree with this statement. As described in my example above, it is very easy to package a web app into a frame which is basically nothing else than an embedded web browser component in order to make it available through the App Store or Cydia for that matter. In fact most "build your own app without knowing how to code" websites do it this way.

You know it is perfectly simple to write an app in Dashcode and then import it to Xcode and compile it. Depending what functionality it needs to perform, it may not need to even connect to the Internet. Other exceptions are, for example, iAds when used inside an app are essentially the same as Dashcode and need nothing more than Javascript to function. I would consider Siri a native application although it is more like part of the operating system but she will not function whatsoever unless connected to the Internet. So I agree with Dick, it is definitely a gray area on how one defines a native app.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #17 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by macslut View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Well...


Mail, Voice search/dictation, Maps, Web Browsers and such "native" apps rely on a web server component -- so the distinction is a little bit fuzzy.


The first native iPhone app I wrote was an app that streamed Music Videos from a web server -- it was coded in Xcode, Installed on the iPhone, downloaded, then cached images and text descriptions of the Music Video files on startup. When the user selected a video, it would stream it from the web site...


I would certainly consider it to be a "native" iPhone app.

The distinction really isn't that fuzzy.  Most native apps have some sort of server component.  However, a Web app is something where the code is server based, except for the code delivered as HTML/CSS/Javascript or other web browser capable technologies.

On the iOS, it's simple... can it be run in Safari? If yes, then it's a Web app and not a Native App.  Is it in the iTunes Store, or Cydia?  If yes, then it's a Native App and not a Web App.

That's a pretty distinct differentiation that works well and is generally accepted.  See Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_app

If one changes that definition to mean that web apps are native apps that have X amount of interaction with a server, then there's no point in using the term.

I think what they are saying is that it is a native app for the purposes of settings and to customize the browser chrome. However, it is basically a web app. They clearly reference OWA which is Outlook Web Access. So this is just like any other crap native app using a browser window to make people think they have a real app when they actually don't.
post #18 of 42

Having spent almost two decades creating such apps, I'd categorize them this way (and even this doesn't hit all the variations)...

 

Native app - standalone client code meant to be installed locally.  E.g. the GMail app from the App Store.

 

Online web browser app - requires browser to access and run client code that is always downloaded from a web server.  E.g. GMail using Safari to access  http://mail.google.com

 

Offline web browser app - also browser based, but uses HTML5 manifest to download core pages ahead of time and also create a desktop icon, so it can start up even if offline.

 

Dedicated webview app - native app with a webview that accesses remote HTML pages for all the client pages.  E.g. simple bank access "apps" that are basically dumb browser wrapper shells hardcoded to access one URL.

 

Hybrid webview appA variation that is also dedicated to a URL, and downloads all HTML pages from there, but also provides native resource access (e.g. radio status, file access, etc) via a smarter webview framework.

 

Native app with HTML UI  - native app with a webview showing HTML UI pieces embedded in the app.  E.g. most PhoneGap based apps.  (Or a combo.  I once worked on a Java Blackberry app that was mostly native UI but also had some HTML based pages.)  These are often called "hybrid apps" in the press.

 

---

 

Here, Microsoft confuses things even more by using their term OWA (Outlook Web App), which usually simply refers to an online web app that used XMLHttpRequests to access an Outlook server.

 

Apparently this particular app uses OWA comms, but also gives the web pages access to native resources, such as voice input.   So it's definitely not a simple webview app, but is at least more of a hybrid.


Edited by KDarling - 7/17/13 at 5:37am
post #19 of 42
We use Office 365 at work so I thought I'd try it. I entered my email address and password. Didn't work. I went to 'advanced', copied the setting from Mail on my iPhone. Didn't work because of an incompatible version of Office 365. Clicked the help link and it gave me this:

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/help/am-i-using-office-365-after-the-service-upgrade-HA103982331.aspx

That's incomprehensible.

Bin. Never again.
post #20 of 42
I can't find it, I search for outlook and microsoft outlook and it just returns a bunch of junk apps that are not from microsoft. Apple, your iphone store is unusable everytime I go on it I get pissed off. I should have never bought an iphone.
post #21 of 42

Yea, I think KDarling actually got quite a nice overview.

 

 

Regarding:

Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

You know it is perfectly simple to write an app in Dashcode and then import it to Xcode and compile it. Depending what functionality it needs to perform, it may not need to even connect to the Internet. Other exceptions are, for example, iAds when used inside an app are essentially the same as Dashcode and need nothing more than Javascript to function. I would consider Siri a native application although it is more like part of the operating system but she will not function whatsoever unless connected to the Internet. So I agree with Dick, it is definitely a gray area on how one defines a native app.

 

Let's agree to disagree then, because there is not that much gray to it. Nothing you write in Dashcode is natively compiled whatsoever, not even when you move it to Xcode and hit the "build" button.

 

Again, whether you access the internet or not is not relevant.

 

Those Dashcode "apps" you are talking about remain web apps, because of the technologies they are created with and the wrappers they need in order to run. The same is true for iAds, which again are nothing more than a little embedded website.

 

The fact that you can just "compile" such web apps and distribute them has nothing to do with being native, because your scripts will still get interpreted at runtime, either by a webkit component or another type or virtual environment.

 

As for Siri, it is a native application in itself, just that it is being integrated by Apple in a totally different way. The fact that it accesses content through the internet does not make it a "web app".

 

As for operating systems, those are a totally different matter and as a user, you never really use it or interact with it. You interact with programs running on top of it. The operating system itself is responsible for managing hardware resources and for making them available to applications running on top of the system.

 

In fact this also nicely explains the difference between a native app and those web apps the confusion is all about. Whereas native applications are architecture specific and run directly on top of the operating system or even as part thereof, web applications and others don't. They require another layer or "application" on top of the operating system to interpret and run them.

 

By the way, the above is also a perfect example for why most Android applications minus most games, are not really native applications, despite JIT.


Edited by cynic - 7/16/13 at 2:48pm
post #22 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynic View Post

 

I would disagree with this statement. As described in my example above, it is very easy to package a web app into a frame which is basically nothing else than an embedded web browser component in order to make it available through the App Store or Cydia for that matter. In fact most "build your own app without knowing how to code" websites do it this way.

 

I think you're over-complicating things, to the point where definitions have no meaning.

 

I've used services that create apps that are in the iTunes store which are nothing more than a webkit wrapper, but again, that's a native app because... unlike a web app, you're possibly buying it, it's in iTunes or Cydia, you get app updates as opposed to server updates, and you aren't using Safari to access it.

 

Now, I've also coded in Xcode, and by no means would I compare what goes into each an Xcode app and a service that wraps HTML up int a native app, but that's all from a developer perspective.  From a user perspective, if it's a web app, you know, go to Safari and enter the address.  If it's a native app, go to the iTunes store or Cydia.

post #23 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Having spent almost two decades creating such apps, I'd categorize them this way (and even this doesn't hit all the variations)...

[snip - actual definitions see OP]

 

I totally agree with those definitions and that there are more variations, but I think that's overwhelming for my mom.  For her, and others like her, I'd go with the wikipedia definition and categorization of web app, "mom, tap the Safari icon" and native app, "mom, download this from iTunes". And really from the user's perspective that's all that's needed along with potential notifications when apps need to be online to run.

post #24 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by macslut View Post

 

I think you're over-complicating things, to the point where definitions have no meaning.

 

I've used services that create apps that are in the iTunes store which are nothing more than a webkit wrapper, but again, that's a native app because... unlike a web app, you're possibly buying it, it's in iTunes or Cydia, you get app updates as opposed to server updates, and you aren't using Safari to access it.

 

Now, I've also coded in Xcode, and by no means would I compare what goes into each an Xcode app and a service that wraps HTML up int a native app, but that's all from a developer perspective.  From a user perspective, if it's a web app, you know, go to Safari and enter the address.  If it's a native app, go to the iTunes store or Cydia.

 

Fair enough, even though this definition is simply wrong from a technical perspective.

 

That being said, I'm realising that most people just simply call everything they can download from the store a native app. But then again, that doesn't make it right and considering the outcry some non-native apps cause, such as the old Facebook app, I think it is quite interesting to give this whole topic some more perspective.

 

Edit: I'm not sure changing these definitions because of users is such a good idea. At the end of the day whomever isn't interested doesn't need to bother. My mom for example would not use the term "web app" or "native app", she'd say "the internet is off" or "my email thingy is not working", totally ignorant of whether this happens in a browser or within an app she downloaded from the App Store.


Edited by cynic - 7/16/13 at 2:58pm
post #25 of 42
Web app? That's means HTML 5, not a native iOS app using Apple's SDK, Cocoa, graphics libraries, etc... Facebook tried that, thinking it would be cheaper to develop iOS and Android apps from the same code base, and the result was poor performance and a lousy UX... Zuckerberg was right when he acknowledged that approach was a mistake, and Facebook went native...

The fact is, any serious iOS developer develops native apps, not web apps... Microsoft is not one of them...
post #26 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by BertieBig View Post

We use Office 365 at work so I thought I'd try it. I entered my email address and password. Didn't work. I went to 'advanced', copied the setting from Mail on my iPhone. Didn't work because of an incompatible version of Office 365. Clicked the help link and it gave me this:

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/help/am-i-using-office-365-after-the-service-upgrade-HA103982331.aspx

That's incomprehensible.

Bin. Never again.
welcome to the wonderful world of Microsucks!
post #27 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by wormywyrm View Post

I can't find it, I search for outlook and microsoft outlook and it just returns a bunch of junk apps that are not from microsoft. Apple, your iphone store is unusable everytime I go on it I get pissed off. I should have never bought an iphone.
you seem like a pretty smart guy (?), why don't you go use one of the 500 android stores?

Or maybe try using the actual app name or the hotlink, both of which are in the article above? Duh!!! And you can blame the morons at MSFT for not actually putting the name "outlook" in their title, or at least tagging it!
Edited by FreeRange - 7/16/13 at 3:33pm
post #28 of 42
French app unable to use an Hotmail.com email address. Requires maybe an .fr one but former addresses did'nt use geographical domain...
post #29 of 42

from wikipedia:

 

Outlook Web App (OWA), originally called Outlook Web Access and before that Exchange Web Connect (EWC), is a webmail service of Microsoft Exchange...

post #30 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


Well...

Mail, Voice search/dictation, Maps, Web Browsers and such "native" apps rely on a web server component -- so the distinction is a little bit fuzzy.

The first native iPhone app I wrote was an app that streamed Music Videos from a web server -- it was coded in Xcode, Installed on the iPhone, downloaded, then cached images and text descriptions of the Music Video files on startup. When the user selected a video, it would stream it from the web site...

I would certainly consider it to be a "native" iPhone app.

A native app is coded explicitly for the platform in question... in this case iOS.

 

A web app was coded for use on a web browser therefore cannot be native.

post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by wormywyrm View Post

I can't find it, I search for outlook and microsoft outlook and it just returns a bunch of junk apps that are not from microsoft. Apple, your iphone store is unusable everytime I go on it I get pissed off. I should have never bought an iphone.

 

Something to think about:

1) Microsoft isn't calling this thing Outlook. The word "Outlook" doesn't appear anywhere in the product page. (Now, this is a mistake, IMO, because lots of third party mail programs have included "Outlook" as a keyword to snag people searching the App Store). But whatever. Microsoft didn't think to make it findable that way. Blame them.

 

2) The second thing you could have tried, based on the story above, is search for OWA (the official name of the app). It's mentioned several times in the story above. In fact, more popular sites like Verge keep calling it "Outlook Web App" and only mentioned OWA once in their story, whereas AppleInsider used the correct name several times in their article. (Surprised? I was 1wink.gif).

 

3) You could have clicked the link in the original article. Yes, I know. AppleInsider often doesn't make explicitly clear where their embedded hyperlinks go, like this--> Click here to open Microsoft OWA in iTunes.

 

4) Blaming the App Store search function. Hmm... now that's an interesting thought. The Search Engine Which Shall Not Be Named is getting pretty good at all kinds of "fuzzy" searches, so maybe we're getting spoiled by that and we find anything less dissatisfying. Think it can do better? Let's try searching for "Microsoft Outlook iPad app":

 

 

 

NOPE! It only finds Mail+ in the App Store, which is not the Microsoft app. So it did no better than Apple's App Store search. Can you really blame Apple?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Something to think about:
1) Microsoft isn't calling this thing Outlook. The word "Outlook" doesn't appear anywhere in the product page. (Now, this is a mistake, IMO, because lots of third party mail programs have included "Outlook" as a keyword to snag people searching the App Store). But whatever. Microsoft didn't think to make it findable that way. Blame them.
At a guess I'd say they gave it a slightly confusing name to lower the number of outlook.com users downloading it. I'd also guess that they are going to put a page on office 365 that links to it so office 365 users can find it.

I don't have office 365 so haven't actually tried the app, but looking at the screenshots it looks nice. Also seems a good way for users to separate their work emails from personal emails as iOS doesn't let you create additional mail icons for each mailbox.
post #33 of 42
Just tried it ......says it doesn't work with hotmail accounts?!...what are they doing? Another xbox one style stunt. Apples mail system works just fine of course but makes you wonder where microsoft's head is at.
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post

welcome to the wonderful world of Microsucks!

Quite. Microsoft's resurgence will not happen unless they start to produce good experiences of their products. Thing is, it's never mattered before at MS. Turning that oil tanker around is going to take some doing.
post #35 of 42
I just finished reading this article at Vanity Fair from last year: Microsoft’s Lost Decade

The article in itself had a lot of BS concerning Microsoft at one time being the "ultimate cool" and of course "innovative"... blah, blah.

However, the "meat" of the article containing the process of 'stack ranking' and company inside politics being more important than the products themselves, seems to be alive and well today.

Give it a read if you have the time... also, quite a few Microsoft employees decided to leave comments and back up the claims made against MS. 1tongue.gif

* I came across this VF article after reading this article at stratechery: Why Microsoft’s Reorganization Is a Bad Idea. Main point of this article is that MS is no Apple, and it's too late now with the culture they have cultivated to change any time soon into becoming more like Apple. In fact, it may hasten MS's downfall. I don't necessarily think that is a good thing...1hmm.gif
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
post #36 of 42
I just searched the App Store, it's not even there! Get your facts straight!
post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by btracy713 View Post

I just searched the App Store, it's not even there! Get your facts straight!

 

It is there, just hard to find.  For iPhone, it's called 'OWA for iPhone' and is third hit in the App Store on iPhone if you search for 'OWA'.

 

Why MS would call it that is beyond me.

post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by virtua View Post

Just tried it ......says it doesn't work with hotmail accounts?!...what are they doing? Another xbox one style stunt. Apples mail system works just fine of course but makes you wonder where microsoft's head is at.

 

What are they doing? Quite clearly making an app for Office 365 customers. Why you think it would work with your Hotmail account I do not know. It's a bit like downloading the Lync app and stating that it doesn't work with messenger or Skype.

 

Apple's Mail app also does virtually everything Hotmail has so there isn't really a need to build an app to add missing functionality.

post #39 of 42

Yet another attempt by Microsoft to shove their garbage UI down the throats of people that didn't buy their OS.

 

Microsoft, if people wanted to see text clipped on the right edge of the screen, they'd buy your phones and tablets.  But they aren't doing that, are they?

 

Design your iOS apps using iOS UI guidelines, please.

post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by MachineShedFred View Post

Design your iOS apps using iOS UI guidelines, please.

"Apple doesn't; why should we?" 1wink.gif

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Microsoft releases native Outlook Web Apps for iPhone, iPad