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Patent reveals Apple's process for mass producing Liquidmetal alloy - Page 2

post #41 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

...And all this time I thought the major feature was to have the phone bounce back up into your hand if you dropped it.

Exactly! I wonder if this means Apple will bring back the 'bounce' option in Mail? 1wink.gif
Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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post #42 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Should have asked for "IGZO" as your user title. 1tongue.gif

Regrets, regrets...

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #43 of 58

nada

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #44 of 58

Hmm...this video shows how liquidmetal can be used to make a battery... so one could have a battery that is also the device case; thereby combining the two bulkiest and weightiest components of an iPhone into the same single structure and then allowing you to put the rest of the product inside the battery/case!

 

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #45 of 58
When do you think all of apple devices will switch from aluminum to this liquid metal?
post #46 of 58
I have two questions re: Liquid Metal:

1) Will it have stupid chip able edges like the ipad mini and iPhone 5 - serious aesthetic flaws compared to previous

2) Can it be recycled? This currently benefits production of aluminium cases. Comparative cost?
post #47 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post


I was disappointed that he never referenced his movies when he ran for governor. It would have been funny if he said "vote for me if you want to live" or "get to the polls".

He did on many occasions, at least the sound bites they showed here on Swiss TV anyway.

http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2009/01/15/schwarzenegger-uses-his-movies-to-make-points-as-governor/
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #48 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtis Hannah View Post

When do you think all of apple devices will switch from aluminum to this liquid metal?

Well I remember an article from this website where the inventor of Liquidmetal stated that Apple is at least three years away from using this material in large parts such as casings. The article was from 2012 so that would make it at the earliest in 2015. So it seems that it's still a little early for large scale production of Liquidmetal but smaller parts might already be produced using Liquidmetal in the next products. There are Samsung and Nokia phones who already use Liquidmetal for smaller operational parts (according to the article, not able to confirm this) and Apple's sim card eject tool is also made from this material. So it seems that would not be unfeasible.

 

Quote from article:

"It is unlikely that MacBook casings will be made from the material in the near future, however there is a possibility that small operational parts such as hinges and brackets can be produced. "

 

http://appleinsider.com/articles/12/05/02/expert_says_apple_is_unlikely_to_use_liquidmetal_casings_for_2_4_years


Edited by Chipsy - 7/18/13 at 6:39am
post #49 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post


Terminator 2, T-1000 (Liquid Metal, you know because of this threads topic) was sent to kill John Connor, not Sarah Connor, that was part 1. Saaaaafffffffeeeee

T-1000 never asked anyone if they were John Connor. The quote is "Are you Sarah Connor?" as said by the first Terminator in the first movie. So again, you have the wrong Terminator, the wrong movie, and the wrong Connor. The T-1000 knew exactly who he was going for so he didn't need to track down all the John Connors unlike in the first movie where the Terminator went after every Sarah Connor in the phone book. Fail reference is fail.

post #50 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipsy View Post

Well I remember an article from this website where the inventor of Liquidmetal stated that Apple is at least three years away from using this material in large parts such as casings. The article was from 2012 so that would make it at the earliest in 2015. So it seems that it's still a little early for large scale production of Liquidmetal but smaller parts might already be produced using Liquidmetal in the next products. There are Samsung and Nokia phones who already use Liquidmetal for smaller operational parts (according to the article, not able to confirm this) and Apple's sim card eject tool is also made from this material. So it seems that would not be unfeasible.

Quote from article:
"It is unlikely that MacBook casings will be made from the material in the near future, however there is a possibility that small operational parts such as hinges and brackets can be produced. "


http://appleinsider.com/articles/12/05/02/expert_says_apple_is_unlikely_to_use_liquidmetal_casings_for_2_4_years

We're getting into that window and with Apple needing a boost excitement-wise (and to move more MBPs), maybe they invested more heavily to bring to market sooner - only time will tell! It's silly but I have actually been waiting since then for a MBP update that was significant enough (Retina almost did it but had concerns at first rev).

I'm not a huge fan of the Aluminum and will likely pick up the Haswell MBP or iMac regardless, but Liquid Metal casing + Haswell MBP would be instant buy for me.
post #51 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJones View Post

T-1000 never asked anyone if they were John Connor. The quote is "Are you Sarah Connor?" as said by the first Terminator in the first movie. So again, you have the wrong Terminator, the wrong movie, and the wrong Connor. The T-1000 knew exactly who he was going for so he didn't need to track down all the John Connors unlike in the first movie where the Terminator went after every Sarah Connor in the phone book. Fail reference is fail.

Listen NERD 1wink.gif I used the second Terminator movie because it had the Liquid Metal killer robot in it. Since this was a thread about Liquid Metal I thought it was cute. I was right for using the T-1000, the T-800 wouldn't have made sense. You don't have to get all technical over who said what as I doubt my iPhone will call me up and ask for either of the Connor's. Holy cow, you're worse then my husband when it comes to movie references.
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #52 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

Holy cow, you're worse then my husband when it comes to movie references.

 

Worse THAN my husband, not "then."

 

My wife LOVES it when I correct her like that. I bet you do, too!

 

1smile.gif

post #53 of 58
Originally Posted by KDarling View Post

Just thinking aloud...

 

The whole point of LM is the fact that it can be injection molded into shapes, instead of having to be milled.

 

The article talks about a process to make LM sheets, which is likely not the target shape, but perhaps could be used as raw material for such molds.

 

Agree.  LM's amorphous nature allows it to be injected into molds like plastic, in a semi-soft state.  Instead of being poured into molds in molten liquid state like conventional "crystalline" metal alloys.  So, I guess, LM makes it possible to create metal objects in more complex shapes than could be cast with conventional metal alloys.  That's more or less the exact opposite of creating sheets.

 

Maybe those sheets, still hot, could be immediately molded into, say, the upper and lower halves of a MacBook Air / MacBook Pro enclosure.  That would eliminate most or all of the complex and time-consuming CNC machining that the current aluminum enclosures require.  (I wonder if it's possible to mold LM screw threads...)

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

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Sent from my iPhone Simulator

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post #54 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post


Listen NERD 1wink.gif I used the second Terminator movie because it had the Liquid Metal killer robot in it. Since this was a thread about Liquid Metal I thought it was cute. I was right for using the T-1000, the T-800 wouldn't have made sense. You don't have to get all technical over who said what as I doubt my iPhone will call me up and ask for either of the Connor's. Holy cow, you're worse then my husband when it comes to movie references.

Movie references are serious business. Please do not get it wrong again. 1tongue.gif

post #55 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post


He did on many occasions, at least the sound bites they showed here on Swiss TV anyway.

http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2009/01/15/schwarzenegger-uses-his-movies-to-make-points-as-governor/


Oh that is awesome. It's too bad he never referenced Predator though, as it would have been funny.

post #56 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

Agree.  LM's amorphous nature allows it to be injected into molds like plastic, in a semi-soft state.  Instead of being poured into molds in molten liquid state like conventional "crystalline" metal alloys.  So, I guess, LM makes it possible to create metal objects in more complex shapes than could be cast with conventional metal alloys.  That's more or less the exact opposite of creating sheets.

Maybe those sheets, still hot, could be immediately molded into, say, the upper and lower halves of a MacBook Air / MacBook Pro enclosure.  That would eliminate most or all of the complex and time-consuming CNC machining that the current aluminum enclosures require.  (I wonder if it's possible to mold LM screw threads...)

Please learn something about metal processing before posting silly comments. Very little of what you've posted above is accurate.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #57 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Hmm...this video shows how liquidmetal can be used to make a battery... so one could have a battery that is also the device case; thereby combining the two bulkiest and weightiest components of an iPhone into the same single structure and then allowing you to put the rest of the product inside the battery/case!

I hate to tell you this but I've watched this flick twice now and it has zip to do with Liquidmetal the brand name for a metal alloy. The flick is about using molten metals as a battery.
post #58 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

I hate to tell you this but I've watched this flick twice now and it has zip to do with Liquidmetal the brand name for a metal alloy. The flick is about using molten metals as a battery.

Yep. It's important to also recognize that "liquid metal" is using 'liquid' in the scientific sense - that is, an amorphous material without crystalline structure. It most certainly is solid. Just like 'regular' metals, you can heat it up to make it melt and cool the melted material down to make it harden. It's not some jelly-like material and it most certainly is not a liquid under room temperature conditions. It does liquify at a lower temperature than some common alloys, but it's still a high temperature.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
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