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Chinese man allegedly electrocuted by iPhone 4 and third-party adapter - Page 2

post #41 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

The whole purpose of brands is so you can know who you can trust. When these (presumably) no-name devices start killing people (how horrible) people will spend the extra $5 to get a charger (or whatever else) with a trusted name (i.e. Apple).

 

If it really were only $5 it wouldn't be that big a deal, but we all know that's not the case.

In any event, you don't need to buy an Apple branded charger and Apple doesn't need to (shouldn't/can't) block all non-Apple chargers (think of all the different USB ports on computers, aircraft, cars, etc, etc, that would get blocked if they did). All you need to do is not buy the too-good-to-be-true priced crap online or off some corner street vendor. Of course, I probably wouldn't trust anything offered even in retail shops in certain countries, including China, where safety is an afterthought.
post #42 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScartArt View Post

I agree but Apple don't help themselves here. Even with the quality design and components that Apple use, an iPhone charger is still only costing them a few pence to manufacture. Instead of adding 1000%+ markup just make a decent 100%, give the retailer 100% and sell it for £5, not the current £15 that they want to charge. That would massively reduce the number of people willing to take a chance on a third party product.

First, you're grossly overestimating the margins that Apple makes on accessories. The idea that Apple makes 1000% markup is absurd. And the idea of Apple making 100%, allowing the retailer to make 100% and then sell it for 1/3 of its current price is equally absurd. I guess you've never had to manufacture products.

In the end, though, Apple is a for-profit business. They sell products for what the market will pay. If the market won't pay their price, then they have to either lower the price or lose sales. Apple has apparently decided that they don't lose enough sales to matter at the current price. YOU don't get to dictate the selling price (other than choosing what to buy or not to buy for yourself).
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post #43 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScartArt View Post

Talk about baseless. Where is your proof that the controller chip costs Apple $2.50?

The fact that you can purchase genuine Samsung usb chargers for under £5, with Samsung, distributor, retailer and government all taking their cut shows that COGS costs are not high. Tear down and testing done actually show the Samsung charger is as good, if not better, than the Apple one.

Apple may or may not be overcharging for their chargers, but as you point out there are quality alternatives in your price point.

People are dying because no matter how low the price for quality goes, the knockoffs will always be cheaper because they save money by cutting corners that make the device dangerous. The problem is these knockoffs being able to reach the market without any safety certification and people not understanding the difference.
post #44 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


First, you're grossly overestimating the margins that Apple makes on accessories. The idea that Apple makes 1000% markup is absurd. And the idea of Apple making 100%, allowing the retailer to make 100% and then sell it for 1/3 of its current price is equally absurd. I guess you've never had to manufacture products.

In the end, though, Apple is a for-profit business. They sell products for what the market will pay. If the market won't pay their price, then they have to either lower the price or lose sales. Apple has apparently decided that they don't lose enough sales to matter at the current price. YOU don't get to dictate the selling price (other than choosing what to buy or not to buy for yourself).

Yes Apple can charge what they like and on a £600 iPhone having a spare charger at £15 seems inline however you are dealing with a situation where iPhones are 'sold' new for £0, with a carrier contract, to people who wouldn't normally spend £600 on a phone. Apple are dealing with a different class of consumer to what they are previously use to.

 

Also given the quantities of phones sold, Apple are dealing with a much larger user base than they ever did before. The secondhand market in iPhones is huge and these are the people that are buying the cheap accessories, they wouldn't dream of spending £15 on a simple charger. By pricing accessories so high there is easy opportunity for third parties to come in at lower prices and still make lots of money. Ultimately it is Apple that suffers in negative publicity.

 

The car industry somewhat recognises this issue. Most manufacturers offer parts and servicing at a bigger discounts to owners of vehicles of an age of 5 years and over here in the UK. For Mercedes they would rather make sure a vehicle is still maintained, with genuine parts, than a wreck being driven about serving as a negative statement against their brand.

post #45 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


First, you're grossly overestimating the margins that Apple makes on accessories. The idea that Apple makes 1000% markup is absurd. And the idea of Apple making 100%, allowing the retailer to make 100% and then sell it for 1/3 of its current price is equally absurd. I guess you've never had to manufacture products.

In the end, though, Apple is a for-profit business. They sell products for what the market will pay. If the market won't pay their price, then they have to either lower the price or lose sales. Apple has apparently decided that they don't lose enough sales to matter at the current price. YOU don't get to dictate the selling price (other than choosing what to buy or not to buy for yourself).

 

Yes, but I think the original poster was suggesting that *if* Apple thought there was a big enough of a PR issue with people getting electocuted using their iPhones (yes, WE all know it wasn't the iPhone), one option would be to make their own chargers cheaper. That in turn would also force other quality 3rd party vendors to also lower their prices and give consumers a good selection of quality adaptors. I've purchased perfectly fine chargers for $10. Good build quality. Not quite as nice as Apple's, but good. Been working fine for over a year charging iPhones and iPads. So it is possible to make a good quality charge for less.

That said, and in reply to the original poster, I suspect that the locations (ie, China) where the safety issue is of real concern, the lack of regulations are always going to allow dangerous products on the market that no quality vendor would ever be able to compete with on price. Any products sold at retail or even online stores like Amazon in a country with good consumer safety regulations are likely going to meet minimum safety standards. I'd never buy a no-name adaptor off eBay. But an established retailor in a country with good consumer safety laws is going to have enough skin in the game that they will make sure they are selling safe products.
post #46 of 87

I'm astonished that the trolls have forgotten their usual line: real Apple chargers are made in China too, and ALL products made in China are the same, therefore real Apple chargers are just as dangerous! Don't let me down, guys.

post #47 of 87
post #48 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by b9bot View Post

If you don't want to be shocked or electrocuted buy genuine Apple products that have been fully qualified by the URL listings to comply with safety.

 

While I agree with the essence of your post, I wonder what the heck "URL listings" are?  URL means "Uniform Resource Locator" and is part of a web address.  Has nothing to do with safety.

 

Could you possibly mean "Underwriters Laboratory", and their familiar "UL" logo?  While UL is a useful service, they do not offer any guarantee of safety (meaning, if you are injured, they bear no financial responsibility and offer no compensation).  It is my understanding that UL's main aim is to reduce insurance liability by reducing safety risks.  It's a nice thing, actually, that insurance companies push manufacturers to obtain some sort of safety certification, in order to keep their liability risk low, but don't for a moment think that UL is out there to save consumers out of some desire to be a good samaritan.  They are a for-profit business, and their customers are the insurance companies.  Not consumers.  They merely campaign to consumers to buy UL-listed products as a service to their customers (manufacturers & insurance companies).

post #49 of 87

It may be nitpicky, but the huge image A.I. has showing the Apple plug is wrong. That's an American plug. The Chinese use the same plug as Australia, which looks like this:  http://i01.i.aliimg.com/photo/v0/519111385/New_au_duckhead_australia_version_au_plug.jpg

post #50 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktappe View Post

It may be nitpicky, but the huge image A.I. has showing the Apple plug is wrong. That's an American plug. The Chinese use the same plug as Australia, which looks like this:  http://i01.i.aliimg.com/photo/v0/519111385/New_au_duckhead_australia_version_au_plug.jpg

If you want to be nitpicky, you should point out the fact that the incident in question involved a cheap third party knockoff and not an Apple plug.
post #51 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post

While I agree with the essence of your post, I wonder what the heck "URL listings" are?  URL means "Uniform Resource Locator" and is part of a web address.  Has nothing to do with safety.

Could you possibly mean "Underwriters Laboratory", and their familiar "UL" logo?  While UL is a useful service, they do not offer any guarantee of safety (meaning, if you are injured, they bear no financial responsibility and offer no compensation).  It is my understanding that UL's main aim is to reduce insurance liability by reducing safety risks.  It's a nice thing, actually, that insurance companies push manufacturers to obtain some sort of safety certification, in order to keep their liability risk low, but don't for a moment think that UL is out there to save consumers out of some desire to be a good samaritan.  They are a for-profit business, and their customers are the insurance companies.  Not consumers.  They merely campaign to consumers to buy UL-listed products as a service to their customers (manufacturers & insurance companies).

Are you claiming that their safety checks are not good for me as a consumer simply because they are reducing liability through these safety checks?

I couldn't care less if they are trying to be good samaritans or not, and I don't understand why people are seemingly unable to accept cases where everybody wins without trying to demonize the other group.
post #52 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

That said, and in reply to the original poster, I suspect that the locations (ie, China) where the safety issue is of real concern, the lack of regulations are always going to allow dangerous products on the market that no quality vendor would ever be able to compete with on price. Any products sold at retail or even online stores like Amazon in a country with good consumer safety regulations are likely going to meet minimum safety standards. I'd never buy a no-name adaptor off eBay. But an established retailor in a country with good consumer safety laws is going to have enough skin in the game that they will make sure they are selling safe products.

I wonder if we will see Apple making design compromises in the future to try and mitigate the lack of safety regulations in the countries that they sell products in? In a 'what is the worst that can happen' discussion I'm sure having mains voltage being present on the dock connector ground/shielding, making the part of the frame live, would be quite high up on the list. Not having a metal frame which the user holds would massively reduce the risk of a fatal shock being received.

 

The fact that it wasn't an Apple charger doesn't really help in this situation. The story was all over the Internet including mainstream sites such as the BBC. The majority of people will just read the headlines and not even realise it wasn't Apple at fault.

 

How much do Apple want to protect the brand and image against making the best products they can?

post #53 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkichline View Post

Hey, here's an idea... how about instead of saving a buck, you buy an actual, quality iPhone cable from Apple and avoid the costly hospital stay. Eh?

Is it sad to say I have yet to have a first-party iPhone cable last more than six months? Or that I went through three MagSafe cables for my old 17" MacBook Pro before I replaced it with a retina 15" MacBook Pro? My first MagSafe cable burned and melted. For cables for my iDevices, I prefer to use licensed third-party since they seem to be sturdier and do not fray as easily.

post #54 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by marokero View Post

And when you get such strong shock, how the hell can the guy utter any words to his sister? I got shocked once on 110V for a few seconds, I could not speak or yell, my jaw closed tightly as the current travelled through my body. Same thing happens when someone is tased. This story sounds improbable and an anti-Apple propaganda from China. I don't deny people got hurt by these bad ac adapters, they should definitely be taken out of circulation.

 

Just because you couldn't speak doesn't mean it's not possible. I received a terrible jolt that made my jaws crash against each other violently, but I managed to swear like a sailor while struggling to get free of the loose wire touching the back of my neck and immobilizing my body.

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post #55 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krawall View Post

It's interesting that this dominantly seem to happen in China.

I thought these kinds of things only happen in the Bermuda Triangle.

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post #56 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Negafox View Post

Is it sad to say I have yet to have a first-party iPhone cable last more than six months? Or that I went through three MagSafe cables for my old 17" MacBook Pro before I replaced it with a retina 15" MacBook Pro? My first MagSafe cable burned and melted. For cables for my iDevices, I prefer to use licensed third-party since they seem to be sturdier and do not fray as easily.

Do you have mynocks around? They usually like to chew on the power cables.

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post #57 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

I'm astonished that the trolls have forgotten their usual line: real Apple chargers are made in China too, and ALL products made in China are the same, therefore real Apple chargers are just as dangerous! Don't let me down, guys.

But then that would make anything made in China dangerous. They want to argue that Apple products are uniquely evil, therefore lets all get pitchforks and meet up on the Internets!

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #58 of 87

How is this news? What if the third-party adapter was plugged into a Samsung or HTC device? Do you always report on anything with the word "Apple" in it?

post #59 of 87
In america, houses have fuses, and bathrooms especially have GFI outlets that have a chance of saving a life in the case of a electrical ground fault via water.

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post #60 of 87
Why buy a cheap charger? We have four iPhones in our house and all came with a charger. Are these genuine iPhones that these people are using?
post #61 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Just because you couldn't speak doesn't mean it's not possible. I received a terrible jolt that made my jaws crash against each other violently, but I managed to swear like a sailor while struggling to get free of the loose wire touching the back of my neck and immobilizing my body.

What were you shocked with? I was once shocked with 110v AC, and I could not move or even think. I don't even really remember what it felt like as it happened. I was lucky there was someone standing nearby to knock the cord out of my hand or I would be dead right now.

To say that someone was able to yell out a coherent sentence while receiving a shock that results in a coma sounds like dramatic embellishment at best.
post #62 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by iaeen View Post


What were you shocked with? I was once shocked with 110v AC, and I could not move or even think. I don't even really remember what it felt like as it happened. I was lucky there was someone standing nearby to knock the cord out of my hand or I would be dead right now.

To say that someone was able to yell out a coherent sentence while receiving a shock that results in a coma sounds like dramatic embellishment at best.

I have been shocked with 110V AC a few times and it is definitely quite difficult to control your body. Given that being electrocuted causes your muscles to contract, it would be difficult to free yourself or even speak. My worst experience was that as a kid, my dad installed a metal soap dish into live wires in the bathroom. I was unpleasantly surprised when I reached for the soap while taking a shower.

post #63 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by iaeen View Post


What were you shocked with? I was once shocked with 110v AC, and I could not move or even think. I don't even really remember what it felt like as it happened. I was lucky there was someone standing nearby to knock the cord out of my hand or I would be dead right now.

To say that someone was able to yell out a coherent sentence while receiving a shock that results in a coma sounds like dramatic embellishment at best.

 

Having this discussion without knowing how much current was actually flowing through your body and where it was entering/exiting is kind of pointless. I've been shocked with 110 V AC. Took me a couple of seconds to realize what was going on and then I simply pulled my hand away. And besides, who said the guy in the article was coherent. Just because that's what the english translation of a Chinese newspaper from some remote region of China sort of suggested that a witness said? I think a lot of the "embellishment" may have been provided during the course of this discussion.
post #64 of 87
So basically this has nothing to do with iPhone or apple.

It is only about a Chinese company killing people with its negligently faulty adapters.

The iPhone belongs in the story as much as the company that built the house with the outlets in it.

Might as well mention the electric company while we are at it.

I sincerely hope there is no twisted element to this where people's lives are put at risk to manufacture political leverage.
post #65 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9secondko View Post

So basically this has nothing to do with iPhone or apple.

It is only about a Chinese company killing people with its negligently faulty adapters.

The iPhone belongs in the story as much as the company that built the house with the outlets in it.

Might as well mention the electric company while we are at it.

I sincerely hope there is no twisted element to this where people's lives are put at risk to manufacture political leverage.

Without all of the facts and an actual unbiased investigation it's literally impossible to tell what or who was at fault.  It could be simple negligence.  Faulty parts, or even just the outlier aspect of having so many of one product in use that you finally hit even an extremely low probability statistic.

 

I'm quite sure this is only in the world spot light simply because it's regarding an Apple product and that generates clicks and views.

 

Keep in mind that the odds of slipping in the shower and dying from head trauma is still higher than getting electrocuted while using an iPhone either properly, or improperly with or without official parts.  I feel horrible for the two that were injured/killed.  The fact that this makes the news is good, but the fact that it's considered world news worthy is akin to a smear campaign.  There's simply too many variables to even consider pointing blame unless all of the facts are known.

 

With that in mind, the use of very simple logic 'common sense' would probably have curtailed this incident.

 

My personal advise (take it for what it's worth here on the internet):  Don't touch ANYTHING that's plugged into (connected by wire) ANYTHING ELSE if your hands are wet or sweaty.  It may have not been the case in this instance, but I'm simply letting those who don't know... know.

post #66 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

 

Having this discussion without knowing how much current was actually flowing through your body and where it was entering/exiting is kind of pointless. I've been shocked with 110 V AC. Took me a couple of seconds to realize what was going on and then I simply pulled my hand away. And besides, who said the guy in the article was coherent. Just because that's what the english translation of a Chinese newspaper from some remote region of China sort of suggested that a witness said? I think a lot of the "embellishment" may have been provided during the course of this discussion.

Again, it's not the voltage that causes harm.  It's the amperage.  I know that's what you're stating and I'm agreeing.

 

Just pointing out for everyone again that you can have tens of thousands of volts passing through your body without harm.  However even less than 1 amp will cause your muscles to contract so hard that you can not let go of what is electrocuting you.  At that point the current will continue to course through your body and cause irreparable harm.  Your only hope at that point is gravity pulling your uncontrolled body away from the circuit before death.  Which does actually happen, but not often enough.

post #67 of 87
No this is Apple's fault. They must change the laws of physics.

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post #68 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

No this is Apple's fault. They must change the laws of physics.

It has happened before.  I would be interested.

 

I'm applying for my doctorate in this field.  Magnetics and applied electric.  I actually study this field every single day.  So far I have not seen anything in any of the reports that could actually point to any cause other than electricity.  There's simply too many variables and the conditions are unknown if not guessed.  Electricity happens to be a very conditional property.

 

Nothing that has been reported thus far could give any clear indication as to what caused this man's injury other than electricity.  Faulty/cheap parts is a speculative suggestion which could apply to both a "cheap knockoff" or an OEM (Apple) product.  All of the details are unknowns, and pointing fingers without the facts is basing an argument on wild conjecture at this point.

 

My posts about other topics were my views/opinions.  This IS my field of study and knowledge.

 

I wonder if Mr. Felix would still prefer me not to be on the jury if this was concerning him.

post #69 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

That said, and in reply to the original poster, I suspect that the locations (ie, China) where the safety issue is of real concern, the lack of regulations are always going to allow dangerous products on the market that no quality vendor would ever be able to compete with on price. Any products sold at retail or even online stores like Amazon in a country with good consumer safety regulations are likely going to meet minimum safety standards. I'd never buy a no-name adaptor off eBay. But an established retailor in a country with good consumer safety laws is going to have enough skin in the game that they will make sure they are selling safe products.

I understand I'm using your statement out of context, but what you said above is simply untrue.

 

In the United States we have the N.E.C. (National Electric Code).  Beyond that certain states have amendments to those regulations.  In my own state we have the Mass Amendments which in relatively simple terms make the national code a bit more strict.  This has very little to do with off shore manufacturing and applies very lightly if at all to imports.  Even if it was applied correctly to imports, the limited amount of Customs Agents will almost certainly guarantee that poor quality product will become salable in the United States.  This is the entire reason (although not code oriented) why you can buy a Gucci bag for $15.  Just using a "for instance".

 

Even in the U.S.A. it's still a case of buyer beware.  There are many unsafe items being sold every day.  Electrically, there are many two pronged extension cords being sold every day which are in peoples houses and do not meet code.

 

Don't rely on regulations.  Research what you buy.  Even if "it's just an extension cord!  What could go wrong?"

 

I could actually list quite a few examples electrically which are commonly sold in the United States that unfortunately do not meet "regulations".  Most people don't understand what's wrong with seeing an electrical product in an "all for a dollar" store...  Though I bet they're the first to jibe at someone for not buying an actual Apple accessory.  It's kind of amazing if you take all of the fanaticism out of the equation.  Some are willing to buy the Apple product because they know it's quality, but they'll buy a $5 lamp and wonder why the shade caught fire...  Honestly, it really is amazing.

 

Just be careful.  No one is actually protecting you from yourself.  Apple's trying, but they only sell phones, computers and tablets.  Everything else is up to you.


Edited by Vadania - 7/19/13 at 5:56pm
post #70 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by b9bot View Post

Apple cannot stop the Cheap crap that goes to market that people buy that is not an authorized product of Apple. If you don't want to be shocked or electrocuted buy genuine Apple products that have been fully qualified by the URL listings to comply with safety. If you buy crap you get crap, it's that simple.
There are a lot of other factors involved here to like what shape are the outlets in the home like? Condition of the wiring in the home and so on. Are they using some kind of transformer as well. If any of these are bad or in poor condition they to can lead to electrocution or shock.
But an unauthorized wanna be product is the worse offender of all. Not made or approved by Apple. Not quality tested or built to the URL standards for electric safety.

Apple tries its hardest to require testing of every exsisting iPhone charger.
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-News View Post

Very odd. I got lightly shocked by 220V once and certainly didn't feel like talking then. In fact, it's physically impossible. I smell FUD.
Very true, however wonder is did she have contact on low voltage multiple minutes or high voltage seconds?

A report of the brand might be very helpful since it is the fault, is it a cheap Chinese knock off made down the road from her house?
post #71 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-News View Post

Very odd. I got lightly shocked by 220V once and certainly didn't feel like talking then. In fact, it's physically impossible. I smell FUD.

Again, one more time for the masses.  Voltage alone will not hurt you and and will not impede your speech.  It's very much physically possible to speak while having 220volts pass through your body.  It's when you put enough amperage in the equation that it will probably hurt.

 

Here's a few groups of people who are experimenting with an electrical fence.  It's unknown what the voltage on the fences were, however it could be as high as 10,000volts.

 

I DO NOT SUGEST TRYING THIS YOURSELF!!!!  Remember that electricity is very conditional and even if just a small amount of amperage is traveling through the fence it could prove fatal.  The fences in the video apparently do not have enough amperage to cause more harm than a sharp discomfort.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XH3GHxNpnoQ

post #72 of 87

I'm posting this just because it's some of my favorites.  It's high voltage and amperage.  Electricity always wants to get back to its source and sometimes it can be rather stubborn.

 

Mind you, that if you were standing anywhere near this you could possibly be vaporized.  It's unknown actually.  However you absolutely would not survive.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iue5RGZlWEU

 

Another favorite.  This is due to natural elements creating a short.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCpH19TkMqo

 

Sorry, these are two of my all time favorites and I had to share.  They're off topic.  I watch them at least once a week/month.

 

Edit:  Sorry about the language in the second video!  Boys will be boys I suppose.


Edited by Vadania - 7/20/13 at 2:46am
post #73 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vadania View Post

Again, one more time for the masses.  Voltage alone will not hurt you and and will not impede your speech.  It's very much physically possible to speak while having 220volts pass through your body.  It's when you put enough amperage in the equation that it will probably hurt.

Here's a few groups of people who are experimenting with an electrical fence.  It's unknown what the voltage on the fences were, however it could be as high as 10,000volts.

I DO NOT SUGEST TRYING THIS YOURSELF!!!!  Remember that electricity is very conditional and even if just a small amount of amperage is traveling through the fence it could prove fatal.  The fences in the video apparently do not have enough amperage to cause more harm than a sharp discomfort.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XH3GHxNpnoQ

That's just peanuts. Try a van de graff generator (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_de_Graaff_generator) which chan easily achieve millions of volts. You can put your hand on one and the worst that will happen is that your hair will stand on end.

Of course, the amperage is infinitesimal, so no harm is done.
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post #74 of 87
Chinese does have an electronics standard (CCC) for safety as UL approval. The problem is that Chinese government agency does not enforce it. Sad to live in China where faulty product/food/water/air kills. I moved back to US because of poor Chinese regulations. The previous administration's harmony policy was... (I don't know the Chinese thinking!) Better give example: Police department will not be recorded crime if material damage/medical bill is less than US$800; so slap some one's face or beating around without broken bone is not a crime.

Every Chinese government personnel thinks that they are above the law as we have NSA... Ha! Ha! They worked for the public interest; so, they are exampled from liabilities.
post #75 of 87

This happens because domestic electrical installations in China do not use Earth circuits to save many on copper wire.  Serves em right.

post #76 of 87
Umm, he can't be electrocuted and in a coma. The word electrocuted means to kill with electricity.
post #77 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by iaeen View Post


Are you claiming that their safety checks are not good for me as a consumer simply because they are reducing liability through these safety checks?

I couldn't care less if they are trying to be good samaritans or not, and I don't understand why people are seemingly unable to accept cases where everybody wins without trying to demonize the other group.

I didn't "demonize" the UL.  In fact, I said what they do is "a nice thing".  Why do you read negativity into my post, where there was none?

post #78 of 87
Quote:
third-party adapter

This is what's known as Darwinian Engineering.

If you're stupid enough to buy crap, you'll be killed by it.

Survival of the Apple.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
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post #79 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I wonder if it was the same brand of adaptor as the woman had? There might be a whole batch that needs recalling.

Does anything ever get recalled in China?  Their industrial/tech economy is so young, that they haven't yet developed the "safety culture" that western nations have.  It is also possible that cultural differences may prevent them from ever developing one.  I guess those of us in other countries have to protect ourselves from dangerous Chinese products - they certainly can't seem to do it.

post #80 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by donarb View Post

Umm, he can't be electrocuted and in a coma. The word electrocuted means to kill with electricity.

The gentleman involved had enough electricity pass through his system to put him into a coma.  I it is very common and not beyond the realm of possibility.

 

Just because the "blog" states that the gentleman was electrocuted, and you happened to look it up doesn't mean it was either correct factually.  Keep that in mind when you think you are reading the rest of the "facts" in said "blog". 


Edited by Vadania - 7/21/13 at 3:21am
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