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Chinese man allegedly electrocuted by iPhone 4 and third-party adapter - Page 3

post #81 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by AussieinHK View Post

This happens because domestic electrical installations in China do not use Earth circuits to save many on copper wire.  Serves em right.

I'm not well versed in common electrical installations in China.  The items I have read actually have very stringent code in metropolitan areas.  Please enlighten me where you are getting your information.  This could very well be similar to someone in West Virginia pulling apart the conductors in their cable and putting them in their toaster to charge a device...

 

No offense to West Virginians of course.  There's some obviously strange statistics originating from that area.

post #82 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeliu58 View Post

Chinese does have an electronics standard (CCC) for safety as UL approval. The problem is that Chinese government agency does not enforce it. Sad to live in China where faulty product/food/water/air kills. I moved back to US because of poor Chinese regulations. The previous administration's harmony policy was... (I don't know the Chinese thinking!) Better give example: Police department will not be recorded crime if material damage/medical bill is less than US$800; so slap some one's face or beating around without broken bone is not a crime.

Every Chinese government personnel thinks that they are above the law as we have NSA... Ha! Ha! They worked for the public interest; so, they are exampled from liabilities.

 

Please do some research.  "U.L." is actually short for underwriters laboratories and China has little reason to enforce an independent U.S. company on their own soil.  It's a U.S. based company that subjects items to certain scrutiny which in some cases is completely biased depending on which company is funding them.  Their equivalent is F.M. Global on the larger, more profitable items.  There are a lot of small independents that provide the same service but will rarely be mentioned on Blue Prints or Electrical Drawings.

 

However, after reading the rest of your post I would suggest you educate yourself in at least one area of expertise.  You're either very, very young or....

post #83 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post

Does anything ever get recalled in China?  Their industrial/tech economy is so young, that they haven't yet developed the "safety culture" that western nations have.  It is also possible that cultural differences may prevent them from ever developing one.  I guess those of us in other countries have to protect ourselves from dangerous Chinese products - they certainly can't seem to do it.

I would advise you to look up the word propaganda and have a look see.  Strangely I could not provide a link to the word.

 

Not everything is what it is proposed as being.

post #84 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

 

But an established retailor in a country with good consumer safety laws is going to have enough skin in the game that they will make sure they are selling safe products.

This thought is one of the problems.  It's not only completely untrue, but it just shows how much respect people give a for profit organization at this point.  Do you really think that Walmart is making sure they sell you a safe product, or do you think they are just selling you a product?

post #85 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClementineOrange View Post

In america, houses have fuses, and bathrooms especially have GFI outlets that have a chance of saving a life in the case of a electrical ground fault via water.

No, we have circuit breakers.  Fuses are much better than breakers because they are made to fail at a specific amperage.  Almost none of them will or would save your life.

 

A fuse will always fail on an overage, however a breaker may not trip.  There is actually a brand of breakers that are known to not trip.  Federal Pacific breakers were not very helpful.  You could potentially pass 200amps through a 20amp breaker and it still wouldn't trip.  They're not in business anymore.

 

Also, please look up GFCI.  You might be enlightened.  It should fail if water is involved because generally most houses in the past were plummed with copper pipes.  In the current age of construction with PVC as a substitute you will not be grounded while sitting in a tub of water and holding your hair dryer.  If you have a newer house with PVC piping you are more at risk of electrocution than you would be in an older house.

 

Breakers literally came about because of people's laziness to change a blown fuse.  People would not only need to find the fuse, but pay to replace it.  So apparently the breaker was developed.  It only does what it's supposed to when it thinks it wants to.

 

If you have fuses consider yourself blessed.

post #86 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


That's just peanuts. Try a van de graff generator (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_de_Graaff_generator) which chan easily achieve millions of volts. You can put your hand on one and the worst that will happen is that your hair will stand on end.

Of course, the amperage is infinitesimal, so no harm is done.

Absolutely!  ...and thank you for backing me up.  My original point was to educate people that they can most assuredly be killed by 5volts if there was at least ANY amperage passing through it.  I was most bothered by the person who said it was safe to grab onto both terminals of a 850 cold cranking amp battery with no repercussions.  DO NOT TRY THAT!

 

I used the electric fence as an example because I don't think most of the people reading this "blog" would have even heard of the van de graff generator, a megohmeter or others.  I'm supposing that at least some have heard of an electric fence.

 

Everyone, if you do not know anything about electricity, please to not take a chance and play with it.  Even if it's a remote chance, you still do not want to win the lottery with electricity.

 

Thanks again!


Edited by Vadania - 7/21/13 at 5:00am
post #87 of 87
If he ain't dead he wasn't electrocuted.
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