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SF DA initially pleased in antitheft testing of Apple's iOS 7 Activation Lock, Samsung's LoJack - Page 2

post #41 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

 

I see you did return to this discussion. I'm still waiting for proof you can take a KNOX GS4 and replace it with new software, thereby bypassing all security on the device and allowing a thief to use it.

 

I'm still not sure we're talking about the same thing. KNOX is a secure partition combined with a locked bootloader. I am not saying that a thief can get into the data in the KNOX partition, which, as I understand it, can't be accessed if the bootloader has been tampered with. What matters for making the device useful to a thief is the locked bootloader. Unlocking the bootloader makes the KNOX partition inaccessible, but the non-KNOX partition (i.e. the phone) would be usable.

 

That said, I'm half wrong. I had not heard that the latest OTA update (early July) fixed the exploit that worked for the previous version of the bootloader. You're right to say that the current update has not been cracked for those users who have downloaded it. 

post #42 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by JPDLVMH View Post

QUOTE:
"Well the point is that activation is changing. One would think that if Apple were advertising this as a feature, they'd make it basically functional. But without more available information, it's hard to say too much about how it works."

Please remember that it is not a feature that's included in the present IOS - only in the upcoming IOS 7.
Having tested it on an iPHONE 4 (enabling the security, then wiping, then trying to set-up as new user) I can confirm IT WORKS.

I was not able to re-set the phone and set-up for a new user without going through the additional motions.

 

I've tried it as well. Both trying to activate a phone I "locked" and also by turning Find My iPhone off first, then "simulating" re-selling the iPhone by restoring it to factory defaults and attaching a new iCloud e-mail account to it. Everything worked fine for me.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arlor View Post

 

I'm still not sure we're talking about the same thing. KNOX is a secure partition combined with a locked bootloader. I am not saying that a thief can get into the data in the KNOX partition, which, as I understand it, can't be accessed if the bootloader has been tampered with. What matters for making the device useful to a thief is the locked bootloader. Unlocking the bootloader makes the KNOX partition inaccessible, but the non-KNOX partition (i.e. the phone) would be usable.

 

That said, I'm half wrong. I had not heard that the latest OTA update (early July) fixed the exploit that worked for the previous version of the bootloader. You're right to say that the current update has not been cracked for those users who have downloaded it. 

 

I still don't think a GS4 with KNOX can be used and that every single person that has unlocked a GS4 has done so with an off-the-shelf version and not one where KNOX has been enabled.

 

It would be absolutely useless for Samsung to offer a service to make a phone unusable if someone could simply come along and wipe the phone clean with a new ROM. This is why only the GS4 and late models of the GS3 (early GS3's won't work) can use KNOX - they are literally missing a piece of hardware inside the phone to enable KNOX security to actually work.

 

The theft recovery aspect is explained in the KNOX white paper and it sounds awfully similar to what's being described here. Samsung makes mention of specific hardware level functions to enable this feature (meaning it's not likely some hacker at XDA is going to be able to work around it with a software solution).

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post #43 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post


Had it been reversed and Apple was the one charging the fee, all the iHaters, fandroids, and general all-around-basement-dwellers would be screaming at the top of their lungs as to how Apple should be ashamed to try extracting more money from the consumer.

But no... sh!tty Android users have zero or low expectations of their OS so not a peep of complaints in the Android community.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

"subscription service"?? I don't see how law enforcement could praise that.

 

No kidding...as if the average Android user is going to pay $29.95/year for the service in the first place.

post #44 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

Wait until the DA does nothing to increase police presence etc and the thefts keep happening cause they can always be sold for parts. Stolen phones are a great source for Apple displays, batteries. Etc

 

No need to wait... Other than providing lip service, SF's and NY's DA's are already doing nothing.

post #45 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by TokyoJimu View Post

But will a simple "hacktivation" as currently implemented be able to bypass this?

It would have to be one that changes the serial, IMEI/MEID and even UDID of the device as those are all likely on file in Apple's servers which is where the lock will probably exist. When the phone tries to call out to the servers the lock kicks in and won't bypass without the proper password.
post #46 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

$30 annual fee for the Low-jack feature? Ouch.

That price isn't so bad. It's a pair of movie tickets with popcorn etc for many. Less than a month of Starbucks you are buying every day, etc.

If it was a month I'd say ouch
post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

I didn't realize the average iPhone user was savvy enough to fix a broken iPhone using stolen parts.

I didn't say anything about average iphone users. Clearly you don't live in a place when a few dozen 'you broke it, I fix it' repair shops. Shops that can't get real Apple parts because they are doing unauthorized repairs that void warranties. Generally they use cheap knockoff parts but if someone wanted to hook them up with real parts they might not ask where they came from, or care even if they knew
post #48 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

 

Please explain to me, then, how you can root a GS4. And no, I'm not talking about the common methods circulating. I want to you find someone who has done it on a GS4 that has KNOX installed.

 

Keep in mind that the point of theft deterrence is not to solve 100% of imagined scenarios, but rather to simply destroy the business model behind taking something. 

 

Right now, iPhones maintain high values, have widespread resale markets with significant demand, and are trivial to steal/wipe/resell. Activation Lock will make it easy for regular people who already use iCloud to turn on a feature that's easy and free, and which complicates resale significantly. Add in a fingerprint reader and you make it that much more difficult.

 

Resale/pawn shops will have a harder time fencing stolen, non-easily activated iOS devices, and the ability to offer a reward for return can make it more valuable & easier to return the device rather than to attempt to resell it.

 

Samsung phones are not the same as iPhones. They don't have high resale value because you can go to a carrier and get all the free phones you want. The market is glutted with used Samsung Android phones that nobody wants, which cant be upgraded, and which are obsolete the next time Google releases Android version x.x.+1. So there's not the same huge theft problem driving packs of thieves as there is with iOS devices.

 

Compare the App Store. It's not impossible to steal apps, but iTunes & iOS make it hard enough so that piracy isn't a massive problem. It's easier to buy an app than jailbreak your phone with some questionable hacked firmware that leaves it unstable and complicates things every time there's a new iOS release. That's theft deterrence.

 

All Apple needs to do is significantly complicate the resale of stolen phones and make it easier to return stolen devices than to resell them. Once an iPhone 5 goes from an easy $600 resale per phone to being a task where you have to disassemble the device and sell it for parts (or hack around for hours breaking the security), the market for stealing them for quick resale will collapse.

 

Sure, there will still be theft and assault and various other social ills, but the current situation will be dramatically improved simply by breaking the current ease of reselling stolen devices.  

post #49 of 54

better use LockItTight for Android and for windows... I dont see any reason why should anybody be spending this much amount on applications like this....

post #50 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by doubleberry View Post
 

better use LockItTight for Android and for windows... I dont see any reason why should anybody be spending this much amount on applications like this....

well if you are suggesting make it more explanatory than this....

post #51 of 54

1)Less Intrusive the best feature in my opinion because this is the job of the application to make intrusions in your system which leads to many disruptions most of the time which means they are taking the processing and the memory space in RAM which is very much discomforting most of the time. which LockItTight has overcome in their recent updates therefore I recommend this application.

 

2)they support they provide is pretty much satisfactory.

 

these are the two main reason excluding the pricing which is another plus point but lets just neglect that one for a moment.

post #52 of 54

For now It seems legitimate the argument but I would definitely try this one so i could understand. on the other hand I know that every application is similar in many ways this is just how they present and use other parameters to make their application unique but as you have mention the less intrusion I am pretty much convinced at this point i really need an application like this. and one thing i was looking it on the internet I couldnt find the IOs version of this App

post #53 of 54

yes I dont know why they dont have IOs version I may have read somewhere on any forum that they have launching it soon on IOs with the Under the name of LockOSTight may be... and yes for now its only available on android and PC give it a try.... cheers

post #54 of 54

 

On my Note3, there are 2 such protections for free:-

1.  Android level - remote locate and/or wipe of the phone.  (There is even an app where you can do a remote wipe from another phone)

2.  Samsung firmware - remote locate and wipe plus phone reset protection.

 

I think these 2 are more than enough to protect your data.   No need to pay at all.

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  • SF DA initially pleased in antitheft testing of Apple's iOS 7 Activation Lock, Samsung's LoJack
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › SF DA initially pleased in antitheft testing of Apple's iOS 7 Activation Lock, Samsung's LoJack