or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Future Apple Hardware › Haswell-powered iMacs could hit in late Aug., followed by new MacBook Pros in mid-Sept.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Haswell-powered iMacs could hit in late Aug., followed by new MacBook Pros in mid-Sept. - Page 4

post #121 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

Let's say the mini was revamped as your xMac type box. What CPU/GPU combination would you put into it if you could?
That is a good question. If Apple had a desktop processor with Iris Pro graphics or a similar laptop processor that might be acceptable. Of course I can't say so now as we haven't seen such a machine but these processors are getting really good OpenCL reports. We are real close to the point where built in GPUs will be good enough.

If they don't live up to expectations then the xMac should get a desktop processor with a midrange AMD GPU. For all I care that GPU could be a Fire Pro compatible with the Mac Pro. It would be nice to minimize platforms to support to have a midrange pro GPU in the machine.
Quote:
I would prefer the base model myself and maybe it will be $699 (preferably $599) with the option for the i7 for $150 more.
It all depends upon what that base model is. However I beleive Apple will try to control costs to keep the platform "introductory". My preference would be for a model with a souped up GPU.
Quote:
Also what is so bad about Anandtech?

If you read the site enough you come away with the feeling that the get to much "support" from Intel. Basically they punt objectivity to be a cheerleader for Intel. Often they cherry pick results to publish to show Intel hardware in the best possible light. That might be OK for Intel but Anandtech puts them selves out there as some sort of objective blog that people seem to respect.

Basically it comes down to this, I may read Anandtech but it don't trust them. If something looks interesting I will put it on hold to I can find more objective reporting.
post #122 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

Most likely it is just maintenance.

Still updating! Maybe they found some code exploits on the store site.
post #123 of 141
The iMac has a built in monitor so would you think it's feasible for Apple to make a say a semi larger mini (as the xMac) for $1,499 with the same processor and 680MX with 2 GB as the ultimate 27" iMac? Or whatever the successor is? It's still BYODKM.
post #124 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

The iMac has a built in monitor so would you think it's feasible for Apple to make a say a semi larger mini (as the xMac) for $1,499 with the same processor and 680MX with 2 GB as the ultimate 27" iMac? Or whatever the successor is? It's still BYODKM.

Apple could make lots of things if they wanted too. Using desktop hardware a respectable midrange desktop could be put out the door for $1200 - $1500, maybe even less depending upon all the factors involved. If they where smart they would put such a platform into the new Mac Pro case and sell it as an intro model.
post #125 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Apple could make lots of things if they wanted too. Using desktop hardware a respectable midrange desktop could be put out the door for $1200 - $1500, maybe even less depending upon all the factors involved. If they where smart they would put such a platform into the new Mac Pro case and sell it as an intro model.

I will post here what I said in another topic. Under Tim Cook, Apple will just be "another brick in the wall." Young developers were motivated by Steve's style and it might be a case where if they were looking for a career at Apple may just stick to it being a job under Tim Cook. Also I will add something else and say that what Tim Cook thinks isn't good enough for him may be good enough for another company when a developer submits that idea and makes a company into the next Apple.

Think of it along the lines of when a football player is cut by one team for being "not good enough" and he goes to another team and is hugely successful. Jim Plunkett comes to mind.
post #126 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

I will post here what I said in another topic. Under Tim Cook, Apple will just be "another brick in the wall." Young developers were motivated by Steve's style and it might be a case where if they were looking for a career at Apple may just stick to it being a job under Tim Cook.
I've seen nothing to indicate that this is the case. If you read some of the histories related to Apple product development you will often find that Steve had a negative impact on development. In some cases it was so bad developers had to hide what they where doing from Steve.

In the end it is all about hiring people that want to shake the world up. As long as Apple can continue to do that there will be no problems. By the way if you look at the histories, many people on the original Mac team eventually left the company, many while Steve was still there.
Quote:
Also I will add something else and say that what Tim Cook thinks isn't good enough for him may be good enough for another company when a developer submits that idea and makes a company into the next Apple.
Bad employee matches happen all the time.
Quote:
Think of it along the lines of when a football player is cut by one team for being "not good enough" and he goes to another team and is hugely successful. Jim Plunkett comes to mind.

Think of it as gardening, you can have fertile soil that is acidic or base. Some plants flourish in that acidic soil and others don't, technically neither soil is especially bad but rather are different. People, personalities really, need to find an environment in which they can grow. A fertile soil if you will for their mind.
post #127 of 141
Here's another comparison and let's see what you think of this.

Intel is the dealer at the card table. Everyone else is the player but Apple is at the top of the food chain, the one with the most swagger if you will.
post #128 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post
 Everyone else is the player but Apple is at the top of the food chain, the one with the most swagger if you will.

 

I wouldn't automatically make that assumption. Apple makes the most out of all of them, but that doesn't make Apple Intel's biggest customer when you consider the percentage of Apple's annual sales that is completely unrelated to Intel.

post #129 of 141
All right, though how come Apple is getting access to the i7-4950HQ processor first? Are other companies getting access eventually?
post #130 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

All right, though how come Apple is getting access to the i7-4950HQ processor first? Are other companies getting access eventually?


Where did you read that? Also assuming that is true, how do you know it wasn't a request with a minimum quantity attached? You can't just latch onto every rumor that way.

post #131 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post


Where did you read that? Also assuming that is true, how do you know it wasn't a request with a minimum quantity attached? You can't just latch onto every rumor that way.

SemiAccurate I believe first quoted the story.

Copied to Anandtech and elsewhere: http://forums.anandtech.com/showthread.php?t=2333226
post #132 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

SemiAccurate I believe first quoted the story.

Copied to Anandtech and elsewhere: http://forums.anandtech.com/showthread.php?t=2333226

Often such reporting is made to be sensationalist, that is the story's are written to generate page hits and the like. SemiAccurate may or may not have a lead on something Apple MBP related and they could be twisting what they do have into something that doesn't reflect the deeper truth.

In any event Intel has been making noise over the last couple of years expressing a desire to do custom chips. This could simply be an example of a custom part. Even if not "custom" Intel and Apple are pretty tight, with Apple getting early releases on parts. I doubt that any customer has a bigger influence upon Intel than Apple right now.

Think of it this way, if Dell was to walk into Intels corporate offices and request a special part for an unannounced special product, do you think Intel management would get all excited. I'm sure they would help the out a bit but where is the track record that Dell can innovate?
post #133 of 141

IGP is still pitiful compared to top mobile GPU solutions. Apple should hire someone to head up a division to develop high end products for audio visual professionals, which is an important niche. Nvida has such a division and they are a much smaller company.

post #134 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trajan Long View Post

IGP is still pitiful compared to top mobile GPU solutions. Apple should hire someone to head up a division to develop high end products for audio visual professionals, which is an important niche. Nvida has such a division and they are a much smaller company.

nVidia doesn't make full systems though. I am not happy with Apple's move either though I'll take a wait and see approach and maybe I'll be proven wrong.
post #135 of 141

nVidia doesn't make full systems though. I am not happy with Apple's move either though I'll take a wait and see approach and maybe I'll be proven wrong.

 

 

If Nvidia can afford it certainly Apple can. Apple has more than enough resources to develop more great products for audio visual pros.

post #136 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trajan Long View Post

IGP is still pitiful compared to top mobile GPU solutions. Apple should hire someone to head up a division to develop high end products for audio visual professionals, which is an important niche. Nvida has such a division and they are a much smaller company.


Lenovo has some of the nicer solutions if you want workstation drivers + lots of ram. It works for what you suggest or for running many VMs. Most oems still don't put more than the hardware equivalent of a 650m into a 15" case. Unless you absolutely must be mobile, it gets to the point where a desktop/workstation provides a far better solution, especially for those of us who prefer a large display + secondary display for reference/notes/etc due to a hatred of everything printed.

post #137 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmm View Post


Lenovo has some of the nicer solutions if you want workstation drivers + lots of ram. It works for what you suggest or for running many VMs. Most oems still don't put more than the hardware equivalent of a 650m into a 15" case. Unless you absolutely must be mobile, it gets to the point where a desktop/workstation provides a far better solution, especially for those of us who prefer a large display + secondary display for reference/notes/etc due to a hatred of everything printed.

I'm stuck in the Pro Tools Avid system. forget Windows for that.

post #138 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trajan Long View Post

I'm stuck in the Pro Tools Avid system. forget Windows for that.

Why are you even trying to do this sort of work on a laptop? It seems like that would put you at a competitive disadvantage.
post #139 of 141
So it makes me wonder if Apple is going with dual-core processors for the mini without Iris graphics and save Iris for the MacBook Pro?
post #140 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

So it makes me wonder if Apple is going with dual-core processors for the mini without Iris graphics and save Iris for the MacBook Pro?

If Iris isn't in there then the processor better be quad core. As for Iris I would only expect it in the high end Mini anyways, Apple still needs a low cost (actually lower cost) desktop entry point. Like I mentioned in another thread the Mini could potentially move to desktop processors with Haswell considering how low the power points are with some of those chips. Desktop processors combined with a case refactoring could lead to a more cost effective Mini that still meets Apple profitability requirements. Unfortunately this (desktop processors) means more limited graphics potential.

A lot of people don't think the Mini will be revved this go around. By revved I mean a major redesign of the case & etc. i on the other hand see it as the ideal time for a redesigned Mini. For one desktop sales are in the gutter and as such need a bit of a boost that a "new" machine provides. Second the release of the Mac pro will bring traffic into the stores and as such that traffic might be enticed to buy a smaller more economical machine that is also viewed as new. In other words a new Mini would ride in on the Mac Pros halo.
post #141 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trajan Long View Post

I'm stuck in the Pro Tools Avid system. forget Windows for that.

Fair enough. I haven't seen gpu computation really permeate audio workflows at this point, but I don't know enough to comment on the reasoning. I mean I don't know if it has to do with the age of the code base, the amount of highly parallel floating point computation, financial matters on Avid's part, or whatever else. There are many possibilities. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Future Apple Hardware
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Future Apple Hardware › Haswell-powered iMacs could hit in late Aug., followed by new MacBook Pros in mid-Sept.