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Google to take on Apple TV with $35 Chromecast streaming device for iOS & Android - Page 3

post #81 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crosslad View Post

The Chromecast power brick look bigger than the whole of the Apple TV

They are probably recycled ones from the Google TV thing that didn't sell. 1biggrin.gif
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post #82 of 226

If you don't have AirPlay in your product, then you don't have AirPlay in your product.

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post #83 of 226

So does it need a phone, computer, or tablet to work?  If it doesn't work by itself, it's kind of stupid.

 

People want to turn on the TV, turn on the device, then browse.  No one wants to turn on TV, turn on google device, turn on a second device, use the second device to find video, then push it to the google device.

post #84 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

How do either of those sentences make sense?
Typo, improvable
post #85 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordio View Post

So does it need a phone, computer, or tablet to work?  If it doesn't work by itself, it's kind of stupid.

People want to turn on the TV, turn on the device, then browse.  No one wants to turn on TV, turn on google device, turn on a second device, use the second device to find video, then push it to the google device.


My point exactly. 99.9 % of the time 99.9% of AppleTV users are using the ATV stand alone I would suspect. If you need to stream from a device you can, and far more powerfully than the Google thingy, your entire desk top and ANY app too.
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post #86 of 226
Copied from another article.
"There is nothing new here. You could buy something of this kind from China for at least two past years. Just google for Android TV (and may be add one of the following words A10, A9, A8, dongle). The price for these devices varies from $32 and upto $80 depending on configuration and manufacture's cost. All in all it is a miniature computer running Android (Linux for ARM microprocessor centered toward cell phones and tablets with touch screen). These devices is comparable to USB flash drive with HDMI connector and some of them have bluetooth for keyboard/mouse/headphones and etc and some include micro sdhc slot to put a card with capacity upto 64GB (keep your music, video on the card). You can install XBMC on such device and get access to a lot of content on internet (including video from torrents -- takes a little bit time to capture information from internet and process it before user can hit "play")."
post #87 of 226

One problem of Chromecast as compared to Apple TV.  With Apple TV, your iPhone/iPad battery will not be drained.  With Chromecast it will. 

post #88 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordio View Post

So does it need a phone, computer, or tablet to work?  If it doesn't work by itself, it's kind of stupid.

 

People want to turn on the TV, turn on the device, then browse.  No one wants to turn on TV, turn on google device, turn on a second device, use the second device to find video, then push it to the google device.

The TV turns on automatically when you start streaming from your iDevice. Assuming your iPad/phone is already on, there's nothing to turn on.

post #89 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

Copied from another article.
"There is nothing new here. You could buy something of this kind from China for at least two past years. Just google for Android TV (and may be add one of the following words A10, A9, A8, dongle). The price for these devices varies from $32 and upto $80 depending on configuration and manufacture's cost. All in all it is a miniature computer running Android (Linux for ARM microprocessor centered toward cell phones and tablets with touch screen). These devices is comparable to USB flash drive with HDMI connector and some of them have bluetooth for keyboard/mouse/headphones and etc and some include micro sdhc slot to put a card with capacity upto 64GB (keep your music, video on the card). You can install XBMC on such device and get access to a lot of content on internet (including video from torrents -- takes a little bit time to capture information from internet and process it before user can hit "play")."

I wonder if they can get infected and become a security risk?
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post #90 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by patpatpat View Post

The TV turns on automatically when you start streaming from your iDevice. Assuming your iPad/phone is already on, there's nothing to turn on.

I think totally missed his point of the question you answered. Yes it will work as soon as you select it but you have to use a device such as an iPad, Mac or iPhone and keep that device running. The AppleTV doesn't need a device, it works all alone!
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post #91 of 226
Chromecast uses the Chrome OS. So you are forced to use Chrome OS. You can't just put Windows or iOS or another Linux into it.

It itself can't stream video from the internet. You can't use it independently of another computing device like an Android phone or iOS device. That device does the actual streaming. Chromecast simply receives the streaming from the device.

AppleTV on the other hand can act independently of other devices. It can stream from Netflix on its own - as well as Hulu, etc. And it can stream from iTunes servers - including PCs, Network Attached Storage devices, Macs and iOS devices. Just like Google argues, you are not locked in to OS X or iOS for the external device you are using to stream to AppleTV.

And in the future, AppleTV can grow up into a gaming console.
post #92 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

One problem of Chromecast as compared to Apple TV.  With Apple TV, your iPhone/iPad battery will not be drained.  With Chromecast it will. 

Did you actually watch the presentation? No streaming happens from phone to Chromecast, your phone just tells Chromecast to start playing the stream, Chromecast goes out to web and retrieves stream by itself. No extra drain on your phone. Unless you count normal usage as drain.

post #93 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


I think totally missed his point of the question you answered. Yes it will work as soon as you select it but you have to use a device such as an iPad, Mac or iPhone and keep that device running. The AppleTV doesn't need a device, it works all alone!

Again No. The phone tells the Chromecast to play a stream from the web. No more phone/iDevice interaction is needed. You can sleep or even turn off your phone. The stream does not come from your iDevice, only the command to the Chromecast. 

post #94 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


Mmmm.. I don't think you got my meaning when I said 'ties up' . How about 'required' instead? Try leaving the house with the device that was streaming to the Google thingy, to go shopping or whatever, and see how the rest of the family enjoy looking at a the blank TV screen after you left! 1biggrin.gif

 

According to the writeups, once you tell it to stream a movie from Netflix the stream will take place without going thru your mobile device.  It will go from the router to the Chromecast.  In your example the movie should still play until the end.  After that they're SOL until a mobile device comes back to give it new instructions.  I suspect someone else in the family will have a mobile device, but I assume you're referring to a family that only has one mobile device in the household.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post

One problem of Chromecast as compared to Apple TV.  With Apple TV, your iPhone/iPad battery will not be drained.  With Chromecast it will. 

 

How will Chromecast drain your battery?

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post #95 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by patpatpat View Post

Did you actually watch the presentation? No streaming happens from phone to Chromecast, your phone just tells Chromecast to start playing the stream, Chromecast goes out to web and retrieves stream by itself. No extra drain on your phone. Unless you count normal usage as drain.


I do not see what you said in the presentation.  The AI article said Chromecast stream and queue material from Android and iOS devices.  Do you know what is streaming?  It means what you see on the Android and iOS devices is streamed to Chromecast too.  This useage is different from Apple TV. 

post #96 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by jameskatt2 View Post

It itself can't stream video from the internet. You can't use it independently of another computing device like an Android phone or iOS device. That device does the actual streaming. Chromecast simply receives the streaming from the device.

 

You also seem to be mistaken.  Chromecast receives instructions from the mobile device and then receives the streaming media from your router.

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post #97 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


Mmmm.. I don't think you got my meaning when I said 'ties up' . How about 'required' instead? Try leaving the house with the device that was streaming to the Google thingy, to go shopping or whatever, and see how the rest of the family enjoy looking at a the blank TV screen after you left! 1biggrin.gif

The same is true for Airplay. This is not a direct replacement for appleTV it is an alternative to Airplay. Though it will support many of the features appleTV does. You'll find most homes have multiple tablet/smartphone devices. In my house right now I have 5 Mac/PC devices, 4 smartphones and 2 tablets all which can connect to any Chromecast device in the house without need for an AppleTV. I'd say my house is fairly average.

post #98 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

 

You also seem to be mistaken.  Chromecast receives instructions from the mobile device and then receives the streaming media from your router.

Seems to be a bit of an awkward hybrid - you can't use it without another device to act as controller, but you also can't use it without an independent internet connection to act as a source.  So no OOB video from the device, and no video streamed from your mobile device.

 

Is that right?

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post #99 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by tzeshan View Post


I do not see what you said in the presentation.  The AI article said Chromecast stream and queue material from Android and iOS devices.  Do you know what is streaming?  It means what you see on the Android and iOS devices is streamed to Chromecast too.  This useage is different from Apple TV. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=Hsdrk10bVGM&t=2508

 

Here you go.

post #100 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Nice FUD.
Because Safari is better.

How so?
post #101 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Seems to be a bit of an awkward hybrid - you can't use it without another device to act as controller, but you also can't use it without an independent internet connection to act as a source.  So no OOB video from the device, and no video streamed from your mobile device.

 

Is that right?

 

Great question!  I don't know the answer to that one though.

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post #102 of 226

How would a family stop duelling devices?  If any Chromecast enabled application can work, and you have four family members each with a device, ... anyone with an IQ over 80 can see where this is going.

 

With AppleTV you have one remote to rule it all.  Not with this thing... anarchy in the living room.

 

Obviously, there has to be some form of pairing taking place, which never is as quick and smooth as people say it is.  But if there isn't, Lord help the family.


Edited by patrickwalker - 7/24/13 at 3:55pm
post #103 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

Seems to be a bit of an awkward hybrid - you can't use it without another device to act as controller, but you also can't use it without an independent internet connection to act as a source.  So no OOB video from the device, and no video streamed from your mobile device.

 

Is that right?

Yes, I believe so. Any content played through Chromecast has to be available on the web/cloud. There is no streaming of any content that resides on your device or on your home servers. That's one of the main reasons I'm not considering one. I already have a solution for playing local content. Though for $35 it might be worth playing with.

post #104 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

How will Chromecast drain your battery?

When it's mirroring content:

http://allthingsd.com/20130724/sundar-pichai-on-the-difference-between-chromecast-and-google-tv-interview/

"“Effectively, the Chromecast is a Web media player,” Pichai said. “Once you say ‘Play this YouTube video or Netflix video,’ it is actually pinging YouTube or Netflix over Wi-Fi, going through the Internet backbone, and they are just sending it like they would send it to a browser.”
Internally, Pichai said his team calls this process “flinging” content. Flinging is intended for video and music apps, and outside developers are welcome to build in support for it.
Chromecast will also support a second behavior: “mirroring” Web pages, though that will be in beta for the next few months. With mirroring, whatever you do on your phone, tablet or computer is synced up with the display on your TV. That way you can pull content from any Web site, not just supported apps — though you’ll draw down the battery on the device that’s being mirrored."

Some media content will have proprietary decoders (DRM) that can only be decoded on the hardware. Netflix is usually done that way but I think they have web streaming alternatives. This happens with Airplay mirroring too but native Apple TV apps have the advantage, even just iTunes streaming.
post #105 of 226

Google's television strategy in a nutshell:

 

1. Google TV: a copy of WebTV but with broadband and HD.

2. Nexus Q: a copy of Apple TV, but 3X the price and spherical.

3. Chromecast, totally different from 1. and 2. in every way, because 1. and 2. didn't work.

4. Wait until Apple rolls out their real television strategy.

5. Copy Apple's real television strategy.

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post #106 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


When it's mirroring content:

http://allthingsd.com/20130724/sundar-pichai-on-the-difference-between-chromecast-and-google-tv-interview/

"“Effectively, the Chromecast is a Web media player,” Pichai said. “Once you say ‘Play this YouTube video or Netflix video,’ it is actually pinging YouTube or Netflix over Wi-Fi, going through the Internet backbone, and they are just sending it like they would send it to a browser.”
Internally, Pichai said his team calls this process “flinging” content. Flinging is intended for video and music apps, and outside developers are welcome to build in support for it.
Chromecast will also support a second behavior: “mirroring” Web pages, though that will be in beta for the next few months. With mirroring, whatever you do on your phone, tablet or computer is synced up with the display on your TV. That way you can pull content from any Web site, not just supported apps — though you’ll draw down the battery on the device that’s being mirrored."

Some media content will have proprietary decoders (DRM) that can only be decoded on the hardware. Netflix is usually done that way but I think they have web streaming alternatives. This happens with Airplay mirroring too but native Apple TV apps have the advantage, even just iTunes streaming.

This is identical to apples airplay in that sense. However a lot of content can be "flung" without needing to mirror and thus no battery drain. 

post #107 of 226

Will the mirroring option allow for playback of a movie file stored on a tablet then?  Sure you'd want to be plugged in while doing it, but it sounds like that would address Crowley's concern.

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post #108 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


When it's mirroring content:

http://allthingsd.com/20130724/sundar-pichai-on-the-difference-between-chromecast-and-google-tv-interview/

"“Effectively, the Chromecast is a Web media player,” Pichai said. “Once you say ‘Play this YouTube video or Netflix video,’ it is actually pinging YouTube or Netflix over Wi-Fi, going through the Internet backbone, and they are just sending it like they would send it to a browser.”
Internally, Pichai said his team calls this process “flinging” content. Flinging is intended for video and music apps, and outside developers are welcome to build in support for it.
Chromecast will also support a second behavior: “mirroring” Web pages, though that will be in beta for the next few months. With mirroring, whatever you do on your phone, tablet or computer is synced up with the display on your TV. That way you can pull content from any Web site, not just supported apps — though you’ll draw down the battery on the device that’s being mirrored."

Some media content will have proprietary decoders (DRM) that can only be decoded on the hardware. Netflix is usually done that way but I think they have web streaming alternatives. This happens with Airplay mirroring too but native Apple TV apps have the advantage, even just iTunes streaming.

 

In cases where Chromecast is playing video streams, and not mirroring Browser Tabs, it does not use your mobile device after the movie starts playing. YouTube, NetFlix, Google Play, anything that has a codec supportable by Chrome (H264 or VP8/VP9) is streamable from the cloud and does not require the device. 

 

Lots of denials in these threads. You can wire up several rooms in your house for 1/3 the cost of Apple TV, it takes less space and stays elegantly hidden behind the TV, most modern HDMI sets have USB connectors to power it, it controls the TV via HDMI-CEC. You can control it with any Android, iOS, or laptop, it can work unassisted afterwards. 

 

Apple TV is overkill for this application. Maybe if it starts supporting games and becomes a game console, but for just streaming console, the idea of using your smartphone to control a $35 streamer is a much better value proposition.

 

And you can bet that soon there will be Google Now integration with touchless-voice "Ok, Chromecast, play House of Cards"

post #109 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

When it's mirroring content:

http://allthingsd.com/20130724/sundar-pichai-on-the-difference-between-chromecast-and-google-tv-interview/

"“Effectively, the Chromecast is a Web media player,” Pichai said. “Once you say ‘Play this YouTube video or Netflix video,’ it is actually pinging YouTube or Netflix over Wi-Fi, going through the Internet backbone, and they are just sending it like they would send it to a browser.”
Internally, Pichai said his team calls this process “flinging” content. Flinging is intended for video and music apps, and outside developers are welcome to build in support for it.
Chromecast will also support a second behavior: “mirroring” Web pages, though that will be in beta for the next few months. With mirroring, whatever you do on your phone, tablet or computer is synced up with the display on your TV. That way you can pull content from any Web site, not just supported apps — though you’ll draw down the battery on the device that’s being mirrored."

Some media content will have proprietary decoders (DRM) that can only be decoded on the hardware. Netflix is usually done that way but I think they have web streaming alternatives. This happens with Airplay mirroring too but native Apple TV apps have the advantage, even just iTunes streaming.

Nice. Now all content visible on your device is being read by google servers. Brilliant exploit of users for advertising purposes.
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post #110 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

Will the mirroring option allow for playback of a movie file stored on a tablet then?  Sure you'd want to be plugged in while doing it, but it sounds like that would address Crowley's concern.

Good question. From PC/Mac perspective the mirroring can only happen inside a browser (Chrome) window, I'd guess it is same for phone. You can only mirror a chrome browser window, nothing else.

post #111 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by patpatpat View Post

Good question. From PC/Mac perspective the mirroring can only happen inside a browser (Chrome) window, I'd guess it is same for phone. You can only mirror a chrome browser window, nothing else.
Or in other words you can only stream local content after you allow google servers to access it. Very doubtful you can use this device without signing into a google server as the content must come from google server
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post #112 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Durandal1707 View Post

This device looks better than AppleTV for the simple reason that it works with both iOS and Android devices, whereas AppleTV only works on iOS devices. It seems that it would be nice if friends were able to stream stuff to your TV regardless of whether they coincidentally happened to have the same brand of device as you.

I wonder if it can stream from Mac/Windows computers?

But you have code specufically for it. Google could have licensed AirPlay and it could work for all apps on both platforms.
post #113 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


Mmmm.. I don't think you got my meaning when I said 'ties up' . How about 'required' instead? Try leaving the house with the device that was streaming to the Google thingy, to go shopping or whatever, and see how the rest of the family enjoy looking at a the blank TV screen after you left! 1biggrin.gif

 

You clearly haven't seen the presentation.

 

In their example, they were streaming from an iPhone to Chromecast.  Then they switched it over to the Nexus 7.  They even scrubbed the vid and it synced to the iphone.

 

Read before commenting.  Simple.

post #114 of 226
What make you think the content was ON the iPhone. Seems to me only thing iPhone was doing was acting as controller of google service which actually contained the content. Or are you suggesting iPhone sent content to nexus 7 and it sent the content back again to iPhone.

Think before commenting. Simple.
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post #115 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by patpatpat View Post

This is identical to apples airplay in that sense. However a lot of content can be "flung" without needing to mirror and thus no battery drain. 

 

There is no battery drain on Chromecast, either.  Once it starts playing, you can power off your phone, put it to sleep, do something else with it, etc.

 

Did anybody actually watch the presentation?  I watched it live instead of seeing this headline and making up my mind based on other things than it not saying "Apple."

post #116 of 226
Sloppy seconds for Google again.
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post #117 of 226

Quote:

Originally Posted by Arlor View Post

 

I have to admit I don't entirely understand why many Apple customers make a virtue of the company having high profits. I mean: I like my iPad, but I would like it even better if I hadn't paid a considerable portion of its price directly into Apple's enormous pile of cash. 

 

Maybe all the people who feel this way are investors, which is a different and more obvious story. But why ordinary customers?

 

If the assertion here (correct me if wrong) is that "The iPad is over priced" -- Then why haven't competitors seen any success? If it is as offensive as you state -- there would be no problem for competition to undercut them and take market.

 

General consumers, at large, will very much so compromise.

 

We've gone though throngs of different tablets from Dell, Motorola, Microsoft, Google, and Samsung with different levels of hardware at different levels of prices from $199 to $999. Yet, consumers so far remaining largely disinterested in them.

 

So I don't think there is as much credit there as you imply there is. Rather I don't entirely understand the "virtue" of opposing Apple charging a premium for their obviously desired product.

 

I mean, you don't oppose Sony for charging a premium for their electronics, do you?

post #118 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by snova View Post

What make you think the content was ON the iPhone. Seems to me only thing iPhone was doing was acting as controller of google service which actually contained the content. Or are you suggesting iPhone sent content to nexus 7 and it sent the content back again to iPhone.

Think before commenting. Simple.

I believe that's the case, the Chromecast compatible service (netflix or youtube whichever) is serving the content from the cloud, the Nexus7 gained control of the content by connecting to the Chromecast device and attaching itself to the cloud served stream. Obviously you need the same suite of apps on both devices to be able to do this. 

post #119 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by herbapou View Post

Its basicly an android airplay box.  What is funny is most TV sets already allowed to "cast" something from a lot of android phones and tablets. Problem is a lot of people with android devices dont know they can do that.

 

Apparently a lot of Android users don't know they can surf the internet either...

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post #120 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenbf View Post

You clearly haven't seen the presentation.

In their example, they were streaming from an iPhone to Chromecast.  Then they switched it over to the Nexus 7.  They even scrubbed the vid and it synced to the iphone.

Read before commenting.  Simple.

AirPlay is peer to peer. This sounds like it requires ALL content to come from the cloud. If its on your device you have to share it with google servers first. Google cant make advertising dollars if they can't see the content you want to stream in peer to peer fashion
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