or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › LA public schools to deploy 31K Apple iPads this year, supply all 640K students in 2014
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

LA public schools to deploy 31K Apple iPads this year, supply all 640K students in 2014

post #1 of 86
Thread Starter 
More details have emerged on the L.A. Unified School District's massive plans to supply students with iPads, as all 640,000 students in the district will receive their own Apple tablet by the end of next year.

Education


The district's rollout plans for more than a half-million iPads were revealed this week by CITEworld. The program will kick off this year with 31,000 students at 49 schools receiving their iPads this year.

But the district plans to aggressively distribute iPads to all of its 640,000 students by late 2014, reaching students in a total of 1,124 schools for grades kindergarten through 12.

When the initial deal was announced in June, it was said that the district would pay $678 per iPad, including the cost of preloaded educational software. Assuming that average price would remain, the total cost of hardware and software to the district would be nearly $434 million.

The L.A. Unified School District is the second largest in the U.S. The district's board voted unanimously to award Apple with a $30 million contract for iPads.

But that $30 million deal was just the first phase of a larger roll-out for the Los Angeles school district. The news that all 640,000 students will receive an iPad by the end of 2014 suggests the deal is for much more than $30 million. An exact cost for the larger rollout was not given.

Digital textbooks for the L.A. program will be provided by publisher Pearson. District officials believe the program will help them save money over time by negating the need to buy traditional paper-based textbooks.

The district considered offers from Apple's rivals for the program, including Samsung and Microsoft, but ultimately went with the iPad. Microsoft pushed for the district to pilot more than one device and include its Windows hardware in the mix, but district staff felt the iPad was a superior product, and that it wouldn't be fair to require some students to use a lesser device.

Research has shown demonstrated that Apple's iPad is definitively replacing sales of traditional PCs in education. One pilot program in Idaho dubbed "iSchool Campus" has earned rave reviews, while an initiative at Arkansas State University will require all incoming students to have an iPad as of this fall.
post #2 of 86

If apple could manage to enter the school system in other states than California, they could move a significant amount of ipads.  640k for LA only, imagine if it becomes the norm in many cities or states.

 

The upcoming color plastic shells for ipads mini will be better for schools so Apple can compete on prices. Those institutions tend to be very price sensitive.

post #3 of 86
And we all know throwing money at education works right?
post #4 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by herbapou View Post

If apple could manage to enter the school system in other states than California, they could move a significant amount of ipads.  640k for LA only, imagine if it becomes the norm in many cities or states.

 

The upcoming color plastic shells for ipads mini will be better for schools so Apple can compete on prices. Those institutions tend to be very price sensitive.

 

My little school district in Iowa is buying iPads for the middle school (and Mac laptops -- can't remember which) for the high school. Neighboring districts have done so, too. I know of a few districts in Michigan that have done the same. 

 

I could, frankly, be more enthusiastic than I am about the purchase here. For $600 per student (there's an educational discount, but then about $150 of apps per tablet), I can think of better uses for the money. Especially when half the kids already have one; they should at least check which families can provide one already.

post #5 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkerst View Post

And we all know throwing money at education works right?

 

"District officials believe the program will help them save money over time by negating the need to buy traditional paper-based textbooks."

“What would I do? I’d shut Apple down and give the money back to the shareholders”

Michael Dell - 1997

Reply

“What would I do? I’d shut Apple down and give the money back to the shareholders”

Michael Dell - 1997

Reply
post #6 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkerst View Post

And we all know throwing money at education works right?

 

If you believe education is costly, try ignorance.

There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.

Frank Zappa

Reply

There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.

Frank Zappa

Reply
post #7 of 86
Knowledge does no good if you don't know what to do with it. Throwing money only provides the option; it does nothing to increase learning. That's accomplished by example and routine exercise and a willingness to learn. Don't get me started, public schools are a joke.
post #8 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Apple is doomed. DOOMED, I tell you.

Sorry, had to get that in before the fandroids pipe up.

Are there any reports to be found that an Android tablet bulk order has been placed by...well, any company or institution? Government?
Send from my iPhone. Excuse brevity and auto-corrupt.
Reply
Send from my iPhone. Excuse brevity and auto-corrupt.
Reply
post #9 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by GadgetCanadaV2 View Post

 

"District officials believe the program will help them save money over time by negating the need to buy traditional paper-based textbooks."

 

That remains to be seen. So far most textbook publishers charge almost as much for etexts as for textbooks, and a lot of their justification for the way-ahead-of-inflation increases in textbook costs have to do with the development of electronic editions. 

 

I know this is true for the college market, and a quick inspection of the K-12 sites for a couple publishers suggests that it's true for them, too. And they can't make their students bear the costs of the books. 

post #10 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Are there any reports to be found that an Android tablet bulk order has been placed by...well, any company or institution? Government?

The iPad is much more high profile, prolific, and most certainly gets the attention of educators more so than competing products. At the same time those "other products" do get adopted.

http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2013/01/educators-reveal-why-and-how-school-districts-are-adopting-tablets
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #11 of 86
This is good news...

I wonder what is happening to a similar effort for Turkey -- the Fetih Project. The project includes 15 million tablets, supposedly worth about $4.5 billion -- and was supposed to be awarded in June 2013.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #12 of 86
What a fantastic waste of money by CA schools. Demonstrating that our educational administrators are completely out of touch with kids and reality. Have they ever been around kids? Have they seen the way kids treat their textbooks? Scratched, banged up, etc. they take a beating that no iPad could survive and keep on teaching. The replacement costs for broken iPads is going to be 50%. Not to mention the distractions from all the mobile games!
post #13 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkerst View Post

And we all know throwing money at education works right?

Just "throwing money" at anything -- likely won't work!

But that does not mean that you should not spend resources to resolve a problem or improve an enterprise...

Quote:
Future Shock FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010 AT 10:39AM

I'll have more to say on the iPad later but one can't help being struck by the volume and vehemence of apparently technologically sophisticated people inveighing against the iPad.

Some are trying to dismiss these ravings by comparing them to certain comments made after the launch of the iPod in 2001: "No wireless. Les space than a Nomad. Lame.". I fear this January-26th thinking misses the point.

What you're seeing in the industry's reaction to the iPad is nothing less than future shock.

For years we've all held to the belief that computing had to be made simpler for the 'average person'. I find it difficult to come to any conclusion other than that we have totally failed in this effort.

Secretly, I suspect, we technologists quite liked the idea that Normals would be dependent on us for our technological shamanism. Those incantations that only we can perform to heal their computers, those oracular proclamations that we make over the future and the blessings we bestow on purchasing choices.

...

http://speirs.org/blog/2010/1/29/future-shock.html


Quote:
The iPad Project: How It's Going THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2010 AT 7:46PM

So we're now nearly five weeks into the iPad deployment and I thought it was time to update you in some detail.

The Educational Part

So many people have asked me to explain the educational impact of the iPad. I simply can't yet get to grips with everything that's happening. Put simply, the iPad deployment has transformed our school. Not evenly and not everywhere yet, but it's coming.

There are stages to technology adoption. Two important stages are 'replacement' and 'transformation'. With replacement, you take an existing resource and replace it with an essentially identical digital resource. Think of a paper textbook replaced by the same textbook in PDF form. That's not to be sniffed at - there are big advantages to that.

What we're reaching in some classes is the transformation stage. We're seeing the iPad completely change the way that certain subjects are taught. Our best example so far is Art. I will write and share more about what we're doing in Art over time but it's fair to say that it is already far beyond anything I expected in the first year, let alone the first month.

At this point, all I can give you are some practical anecdotes which, I hope, will give you a flavour of the change.

• I picked up a ream of printer paper yesterday. It had dust on top of it.
• Primary 2 pupils have now memorised their passwords. That's not something that happens when they get 40 minutes a week on computers.
• Last week, we couldn't get the Primary 3 pupils to stop doing maths and go for lunch.
• My daughter April asked me if I could install the educational apps from school on my iPad so she could use them at home.
• We're seeing a reduction in the amount of homework forgotten or not done.
• "Forgetting your folder" for a subject is now a thing of the past.

The one feature that my teachers are crying out for is a way to present the entire iPad UI on a projector. At the moment, it's up to the application how they choose to support the iPad VGA Adapter. Some, such as Brushes, show a 'presentation' style display but almost no applications mirror the entire UI. That's quite technically difficult for a developer, so it would be nice to see something in the OS to support video mirroring.

...

http://speirs.org/blog/2010/9/23/the-ipad-project-how-its-going.html



Here's an index of the efforts of Fraser Speirs -- the pioneer in using iPads one-per-student in education.

http://speirs.org/index/
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #14 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkerst View Post

And we all know throwing money at education works right?

Too negative, Bro!

post #15 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechapreneur View Post

What a fantastic waste of money by CA schools. Demonstrating that our educational administrators are completely out of touch with kids and reality. Have they ever been around kids? Have they seen the way kids treat their textbooks? Scratched, banged up, etc. they take a beating that no iPad could survive and keep on teaching. The replacement costs for broken iPads is going to be 50%. Not to mention the distractions from all the mobile games!

Really?
Quote:
The Butcher's Bill MONDAY, MAY 27, 2013 AT 10:40PM

So we are coming up on three years with the iPad 1. I thought it would be interesting to look back at our damage rate and see how things went.

I've kept a log of when devices were replaced and why. These numbers are based on a deployment of 115 iPads and all the repairs were handled through the Genius Bar at our local Apple Store.

1 Sep 2010: Dead Digitiser

A pupil reported that her iPad was not responding to touches in one area of the screen. I checked and there did appear to be a ‘dead band’ the width of the screen about one fifth of the way up where drags across the affected area would not be recognised. The iPad acted as if the user had lifted their finger from the screen.

8 Sep 2010: LCD Failure

Our Primary 4 teacher reported that one boy's iPad had developed rainbow stripes across the screen. No evidence of any physical damage to the device.

1 Nov 2010: LCD Failure

Another pupil's iPad is displaying similar video issues to the above.

16 Nov 2010: Home Button

An iPad is exhibiting a sticky home button. Clicks are not always registering.

22 Nov 2010: Broken Headphone Jack

A Primary 1 pupil accidentally broke off a headphone jack in the socket. As a result, the iPad thought there were headphones plugged in and would not play any sound. Neither I nor the Genius Bar could extract it, so the device had to be replaced.

23 Aug 2011: 4x4 Farrago

An iPad was destroyed by accidentally being run over by a 4x4.

23 Aug 2011: USB Failure

An unassigned device that had been stored over the summer was unable to be recovered from DFU mode, consistently showing error -1604 in iTunes.

29 Aug 2011: Cracked Screen

An iPad developed a crack in the lower corner of the screen due to being stacked horizontally under too many other iPads.

10 Nov 2011: USB Failure

An iPad stopped responding to cables being plugged in. Reboot or DFU failed to fix.

11 Jan 2012: Drop Damage

A pupil dropped her iPad right on the power switch. The aluminium case was dented and is mechanically interfering with the operation of the sleep/wake button.

27 Apr 2012: LCD Failure

A pupil's iPad developed black and flashing lines on the screen.

1 Sep 2012: Cracked Screen

An iPad had a cracked screen.

2 May 2013: Sleep Button

A pupil's iPad had a depressed sleep/wake button, making it difficult to turn the device on and off.

2 May 2013: Sleep Button

Another iPad developed a bad sleep/wake button.

Summary

• 3 LCD failures
• 2 sleep/wake button failures
• 2 connector failures
• 2 cracked screens
• 1 digitiser failure
• 1 case damage
• 1 home button failure
• 1 headphone jack
• 1 bad interaction with a motor vehicle

So, over the course of three years, a total of 14 devices have been replaced. That works out at as an overall replacement rate of 4% per year.

Of these devices, half were for what we might call failures - damage not resulting from user action - and the other half were damage. Interestingly, our battery failure rate remains at a steady 0%.

I'm no mechanical engineer, so I can only guess at reasons why we may be seeing such a low damage rate. For one thing, I'd say that the iPad 1 is very robustly built. It doesn't have such a sharp edge as the iPad 2-style case, which can be vulnerable when the device is dropped.

The second thing I think contributed to our low damage rate was the fact that we have carpet in almost every classroom of the school except the science lab.

Another factor is that there just isn't that much to go wrong. A laptop has a complex hinge, more than 100 switches on the keyboard, a moving hard drive, a fragile power socket. The iPad has four switches, a charging socket and solid state storage. The 30-pin connector has proven reasonably robust but I expect the Lightning connector will be even more reliable.

Finally, I also believe that being 1:1, and building a culture of responsibility around that, makes a massive difference to the way pupils treat computers. When your name is on it, when your data is on that device and when its damage or loss will directly impact you, you tend to take good care of it.

http://speirs.org/blog/2013/5/27/the-butchers-bill.html
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #16 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechapreneur View Post

What a fantastic waste of money by CA schools. Demonstrating that our educational administrators are completely out of touch with kids and reality. Have they ever been around kids? Have they seen the way kids treat their textbooks? Scratched, banged up, etc. they take a beating that no iPad could survive and keep on teaching. The replacement costs for broken iPads is going to be 50%. Not to mention the distractions from all the mobile games!

I take your point...but everything I've read is that iPads have a positive effect on improving learning from autistic children all the way up to med students. 

 

Perhaps a thicker case is in order, but....textbooks? Made from trees? that are out of date before they are even printed? Hello?


Edited by christopher126 - 7/26/13 at 9:48am
post #17 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


Just "throwing money" at anything -- likely won't work!

But that does not mean that you should not spend resources to resolve a problem or improve an enterprise...
http://speirs.org/blog/2010/1/29/future-shock.html
http://speirs.org/blog/2010/9/23/the-ipad-project-how-its-going.html



Here's an index of the efforts of Fraser Speirs -- the pioneer in using iPads one-per-student in education.

http://speirs.org/index/

 

Thanks for sharing, Dick! :)

 

I love the comment, "picked up a ream of copy paper and it had dust on it!" That says a lot, right there! The rest of the post warmed my heart. :)

post #18 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hydrogen View Post

 

If you believe education is costly, try ignorance.

Brilliant, Hydrogen! Well said!  Made me laugh! :)

post #19 of 86

A great win for Apple and even bigger win for students in LA.  Tablets are a great learning resource.  The only people I feel for are the taxpayers in cA, $678 per iPad even with software when buying in that quantity just shows how terribad government workers are at negotiating.  No wonder they are broke.

 

By having taxpayers subsidize the bill to give out free tablets to kids, they'll be less likely to go out and buy competitors products too.

 

 

Still looking forward to the 'Bullies beat Billy up and took his iPad' headline though :)

post #20 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Just "throwing money" at anything -- likely won't work!


But that does not mean that you should not spend resources to resolve a problem or improve an enterprise...
http://speirs.org/blog/2010/1/29/future-shock.html
http://speirs.org/blog/2010/9/23/the-ipad-project-how-its-going.html




Here's an index of the efforts of Fraser Speirs -- the pioneer in using iPads one-per-student in education.

http://speirs.org/index/

Thanks for sharing, Dick! 1smile.gif

I love the comment, "picked up a ream of copy paper and it had dust on it!" That says a lot, right there! The rest of the post warmed my heart. 1smile.gif

Yeah... that comment put a smile on my face -- it concisely sums up the article.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #21 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


Yeah... that comment put a smile on my face -- it concisely sums up the article.

I remember enjoying the MacWorld podcast (Jan, 2013) where Speirs was interviewed by Chris Breen.

 

:)

 

http://castroller.com/podcasts/MacworldPodcast/3322210

post #22 of 86
I love Apple products. I really do. But This is a waste of money. I have family that works in LAUSD and they'll be the first to tell you that rather than buying iPads for kids, a ton of which will be broken and mistreated, they would rather have school supplies and a proper staff.

My mom's school isn't even able to afford a janitor to clean the bathrooms. The kids themselves avoid using them. But hey, they get iPads! Yay! This is such a great example of ignorance at the top.
post #23 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


Are there any reports to be found that an Android tablet bulk order has been placed by...well, any company or institution? Government?

I think there was a small school that was playing around with Chromebooks, but I don't know any details other than that.  I don't know where they got to the idea that that thing resembles anything useful, but apparently someone bought a few of them.

post #24 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by gjunkie View Post

I love Apple products. I really do. But This is a waste of money. I have family that works in LAUSD and they'll be the first to tell you that rather than buying iPads for kids, a ton of which will be broken and mistreated, they would rather have school supplies and a proper staff.

My mom's school isn't even able to afford a janitor to clean the bathrooms. The kids themselves avoid using them. But hey, they get iPads! Yay! This is such a great example of ignorance at the top.

I think it's because books are too expensive.  Have you seen the prices they charge for text books?  HIghway robbery.

post #25 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frood View Post

A great win for Apple and even bigger win for students in LA.  Tablets are a great learning resource.  The only people I feel for are the taxpayers in cA, $678 per iPad even with software when buying in that quantity just shows how terribad government workers are at negotiating.  No wonder they are broke.

 

By having taxpayers subsidize the bill to give out free tablets to kids, they'll be less likely to go out and buy competitors products too.

 

 

Still looking forward to the 'Bullies beat Billy up and took his iPad' headline though :)

If I were a parent, I'd rather have the school pay for them, but if i didn't have kids, then maybe I wouldn't.  I think it's a lot cheaper than buying kids text books.  Hard cover text books are outrageously priced.  Probably costs less than buying each kid text books.

post #26 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by gjunkie View Post

I love Apple products. I really do. But This is a waste of money. I have family that works in LAUSD and they'll be the first to tell you that rather than buying iPads for kids, a ton of which will be broken and mistreated, they would rather have school supplies and a proper staff.

My mom's school isn't even able to afford a janitor to clean the bathrooms. The kids themselves avoid using them. But hey, they get iPads! Yay! This is such a great example of ignorance at the top.

Paper textbooks that have to be purchased at high cost, warehoused in the off season at high cost, replaced when obsolete in a year at high cost for the replacement: well..., costing it out I fully expect the savings will be there to shift off the textbook budget and add to personnel or other supplies.

 

The "top" is attempting to find savings in the system and that's not a bad thing.

post #27 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arlor View Post

 

That remains to be seen. So far most textbook publishers charge almost as much for etexts as for textbooks, and a lot of their justification for the way-ahead-of-inflation increases in textbook costs have to do with the development of electronic editions. 

 

I know this is true for the college market, and a quick inspection of the K-12 sites for a couple publishers suggests that it's true for them, too. And they can't make their students bear the costs of the books. 

I know a couple of college students and purchasing text books for 4 classes cost about $900.  Which is ridiculous.  IF the prices for ebooks are the same as hard cover text books, then maybe if the kids use an iPad due to it being thinner, plus they can use applications in addition to just reading the text books, plus they are a lot less to carry than a back pack full of books.

post #28 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

I know a couple of college students and purchasing text books for 4 classes cost about $900.  Which is ridiculous.  IF the prices for ebooks are the same as hard cover text books, then maybe if the kids use an iPad due to it being thinner, plus they can use applications in addition to just reading the text books, plus they are a lot less to carry than a back pack full of books.

Then you'd probably like this: Google Play Textbooks, announced yesterday
http://www.latimes.com/business/technology/la-fi-tn-google-play-textbooks-20130726,0,3877022.story

"The Mountain View, Calif., tech giant said it will start renting out digital school textbooks in early August, just in time for school. And renting through Google could save students quite a bit of money.

"You can rent textbooks for six months at up to 80% off the cost of a typical print textbook," a Google spokesman told The Times. P

By going into the Google Play store, users can rent a textbook and then view it in the Google Play Books app, on Android and Apple iOS devices.

Google said it doesn't yet have an exact number for how large it's catalog will be, but the company said it will be a "comprehensive collection." Textbooks from Cengage, Wiley, Pearson, McGraw-Hill, Macmillan and others will be included, the company said."

Additional Mashable article:
http://mashable.com/2013/07/24/google-play-textbooks/
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #29 of 86

That I understand, but a book doesn't break if I drop it. I guess what I'm trying to say is, while this may be well intentioned the money would be better spent in other areas that are in dire need of funding, like my example above.

 

To give another example... LAUSD, which provides free breakfast for any kid who wants it, is now requiring that all kids eat breakfast in the classroom as soon as class starts. Which means 1) less time learning. 2) the teacher is now his/her own janitor, as if they didn't have enough to do. 3) have you been to grade school cafeteria? All we need now in our classrooms are ants! The breakfasts are already free!!! My point being, classic LAUSD pouring energy in the wrong place. 

post #30 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frood View Post

Still looking forward to the 'Bullies beat Billy up and took his iPad' headline though :)

 Nah. Billy might get beat up, but only for his iPhone - the bullies are given their own iPad as well.  Why beat up someone just to get what you already have?

We've always been at war with Eastasia...

Reply

We've always been at war with Eastasia...

Reply
post #31 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Then you'd probably like this: Google Play Textbooks, announced yesterday
http://www.latimes.com/business/technology/la-fi-tn-google-play-textbooks-20130726,0,3877022.story

"The Mountain View, Calif., tech giant said it will start renting out digital school textbooks in early August, just in time for school. And renting through Google could save students quite a bit of money.

"You can rent textbooks for six months at up to 80% off the cost of a typical print textbook," a Google spokesman told The Times. P

By going into the Google Play store, users can rent a textbook and then view it in the Google Play Books app, on Android and Apple iOS devices.

Google said it doesn't yet have an exact number for how large it's catalog will be, but the company said it will be a "comprehensive collection." Textbooks from Cengage, Wiley, Pearson, McGraw-Hill, Macmillan and others will be included, the company said."

Additional Mashable article:
http://mashable.com/2013/07/24/google-play-textbooks/

So the combo of Apple's iPad and Google's discounted textbooks would make sense for your college student.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #32 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frood View Post

A great win for Apple and even bigger win for students in LA.  Tablets are a great learning resource.  The only people I feel for are the taxpayers in cA, $678 per iPad even with software when buying in that quantity just shows how terribad government workers are at negotiating.  No wonder they are broke.

By having taxpayers subsidize the bill to give out free tablets to kids, they'll be less likely to go out and buy competitors products too.


Still looking forward to the 'Bullies beat Billy up and took his iPad' headline though 1smile.gif

In re "The only people I feel for are the taxpayers in cA, $678 per iPad even with software when buying in that quantity just shows how terribad government workers are at negotiating."


Let's accept the $678 per iPad and step back a little.

Let's assume a 10% replacement rate for lost/stolen/broken iPads:

$678 * 1.10 == $746 per iPad.

Let's assume that the iPads last more than one school year... likely 3, but we'll use 2:

$746 / 2 == $373 per iPad per pupil per year....

If the school year is 8 months, then:

$373 / 8 == $46.63 per pupil per month...


hmmm....


Now let's see how this aligns with what we are currently spend per pupil per year in the US (emphasis, mine):
Quote:
Costs per Pupil by State

Public Education by state rankings show that the District of Columbia spent the most per pupil at $18,687. The next top five are New York ($18,618), New Jersey ($16,841), Alaska ($15,783), Vermont ($15,274) and Wyoming ($15,169).

The states spending the least on a per-pupil basis are Oklahoma ($7,896), Arizona ($7,848), Idaho ($7,106) and Utah ($6,064).

http://education.cu-portland.edu/blog/classroom-resources/public-education-costs-per-pupil-by-state-rankings/


So, the iPads cost between 373 / 18,616 and 373 / 6,064 -- Or between 2% and 6% of the total current costs per pupil per year...


But even that is too generous! The iPad costs are offset by costs of textbooks (including distribution and warehousing), paper, computer labs...


I agree, if they just throw dollars (iPads) at the problem they won't improve anything... possibly even make things worse.

But, done responsibly there is the potential to improve the quality of education...

Can we afford not to even try?
Edited by Dick Applebaum - 7/26/13 at 11:21am
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #33 of 86
I wonder what the total number of kids going to K-12 in the world are and what the percentage that are getting iPads. And what the adoption rate is. Like anything, certain schools tend to be trend setters and others seem to sit back and observe what other schools do and then eventually follow.
post #34 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Yeah... that comment put a smile on my face -- it concisely sums up the article.
I remember enjoying the MacWorld podcast (Jan, 2013) where Speirs was interviewed by Chris Breen.

1smile.gif

http://castroller.com/podcasts/MacworldPodcast/3322210


Thanks for that link! I am about half way through it... Fraser's discussion of cost per student per month made me stop and reply to another post!
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #35 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by gjunkie View Post

That I understand, but a book doesn't break if I drop it. I guess what I'm trying to say is, while this may be well intentioned the money would be better spent in other areas that are in dire need of funding, like my example above.

 

To give another example... LAUSD, which provides free breakfast for any kid who wants it, is now requiring that all kids eat breakfast in the classroom as soon as class starts. Which means 1) less time learning. 2) the teacher is now his/her own janitor, as if they didn't have enough to do. 3) have you been to grade school cafeteria? All we need now in our classrooms are ants! The breakfasts are already free!!! My point being, classic LAUSD pouring energy in the wrong place. 

Yes books can break - broken backs, damaged covers, loose pages, torn pages, defaced pages.  How do you wear out ebooks? Granted the iPad can be damaged but each student only has one item to be responsible for now instead of a book bag full of expensive books.  

 

Speaking of book bags, they would no longer be needed and could be banned, alleviating some security concerns.  

 

Your other concern seem very valid, but have no bearing on the issue of ipads and textbooks.  Just because schools systems have made idiotic choices in the past doesn't mean every idea they have is bad.  Even a blind hog can occasionally find an acorn.

We've always been at war with Eastasia...

Reply

We've always been at war with Eastasia...

Reply
post #36 of 86
I found it interesting that they had to go with Pearson for eBook distribution and publishing.
 
Apple's iBooks has turned out to be a bit of a failure in K-12. The DRM is simply too strict...a book's DRM is limited to 10 devices, requiring separate Apple IDs. Districts don't want to give every kid an Apple ID - and per Apple's EULA children under 13 are not even allowed to sign up for an Apple ID.
 
It's a shame too, because Apple's iBooks are (currently) far more interactive than competing publisher's books. 
post #37 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by diplication View Post

Yes books can break - broken backs, damaged covers, loose pages, torn pages, defaced pages.  How do you wear out ebooks? Granted the iPad can be damaged but each student only has one item to be responsible for now instead of a book bag full of expensive books.  

 

Speaking of book bags, they would no longer be needed and could be banned, alleviating some security concerns.  

 

Your other concern seem very valid, but have no bearing on the issue of ipads and textbooks.  Just because schools systems have made idiotic choices in the past doesn't mean every idea they have is bad.  Even a blind hog can occasionally find an acorn.

To each his own, I guess...

post #38 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechapreneur View Post

What a fantastic waste of money by CA schools. Demonstrating that our educational administrators are completely out of touch with kids and reality. Have they ever been around kids? Have they seen the way kids treat their textbooks? Scratched, banged up, etc. they take a beating that no iPad could survive and keep on teaching. The replacement costs for broken iPads is going to be 50%. Not to mention the distractions from all the mobile games!

Our experience in the past year doesn't match your assumptions. It's a small elementary school, iPads now in grades 5-8:

 

 1 - at the end of the year there was 1 broken iPad (a student dropped an iPad that landed corner-first on another iPad.

 1a - Eyeballz work very well to protect iPads. The sole issue is that they have to be taken off when charging the iPad in

        the 10-unit charging station.

 2 - except for the cracked screen of one, they all appeared like new after the final day of school.

 3 - game use has been controlled by managing application through Apple Configurator.

 4 - browser based games have been a minor issue so far, and managed by the teacher in the classroom.

 5 - students graduating from 8th grade have the option to buy "their" iPad at reduced cost at the end of the year. They pay attention.

 

Paper book and tablets aren't handled the same way by the students, in our experience.

post #39 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by gjunkie View Post

I love Apple products. I really do. But This is a waste of money. I have family that works in LAUSD and they'll be the first to tell you that rather than buying iPads for kids, a ton of which will be broken and mistreated, they would rather have school supplies and a proper staff.

My mom's school isn't even able to afford a janitor to clean the bathrooms. The kids themselves avoid using them. But hey, they get iPads! Yay! This is such a great example of ignorance at the top.

Our (very small) school depends on a measure of volunteer help, we're not swimming in cash. Our initial iPad buy looks like it'll break even in comparison with paper textbooks within three years (the school system under which we operate is requiring completely new/different textbooks over the next three years, for one thing). The most surprising thing, for me, has been changes in 5-8 grade students' math studies. They've gone from roughly grade-level work, to about 1/3 of the students moving on to from one to five grades worth advancement, once they were let loose to go at their own speed.

 

We're in a rural central California area, not LAUSD (yay!), but it definitely shows that it doesn't have to be a waste of money, time and effort.

post #40 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by diplication View Post

 Nah. Billy might get beat up, but only for his iPhone - the bullies are given their own iPad as well.  Why beat up someone just to get what you already have?

 

Not all bullies are still in school, and even if they do have their own.... they sell quickly on the street for $50

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPad
  • LA public schools to deploy 31K Apple iPads this year, supply all 640K students in 2014
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › LA public schools to deploy 31K Apple iPads this year, supply all 640K students in 2014