or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Apple's OLED display patent uses embedded sensors to adjust for shadows, diode age
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple's OLED display patent uses embedded sensors to adjust for shadows, diode age

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Thursday published an Apple patent application for an OLED display that uses built-in detectors to dynamically adjust output at select areas of the screen, compensating for ambient light fluctuations or aged diodes.

OLED
Source: USPTO


While Apple has yet to deploy a device with an organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, the company is looking into solutions for issues inherent to the technology, such as OLED color changes due to old age. The patent filing also covers advanced techniques in sensing and compensating for ambient lighting.

OLEDs offer a number of advantages over the LCD panels used in most of today's consumer electronics applications. One of the main benefits is that an OLED can emit its own colored light, making display assemblies thinner and lighter while retaining good viewing angles. As seen in other Apple patent filings, OLEDs can also be disposed on both rigid and flexible substrates.

However, unlike LCD displays, OLEDs degrade quickly, meaning some diodes may "age" differently than others, thus affecting light output. This effect is sometimes referred to as "image persistence."

Apple's patent application for "Organic light emitting diode having photodiodes" describes a setup that places photo sensors above, below, or in line with an OLED array to detect and compensate for these changes. In some embodiments, the photodiodes are located in just certain areas of the screen, while other embodiments have them interspersed throughout the panel.

OLED
View of OLED panel.


Using data from photodiodes, a controller can detect variations in emitted light under various conditions. For example, ambient light information can be collected by the photodiodes. If a display area is dim, denoting a darker environment, the controller can adjust output accordingly. Because the sensors are part of the display rather than adjacent to it, as is the case with the ambient light sensor in the iPhone and iPad, the data is much more accurate.

The patent takes into account that, in many cases, a single light measurement isn't enough. For example, a single ambient light sensor would be insufficient to detect a situation in which part of a screen is shaded, while the rest of the display is being hit by direct sunlight. With photodiodes, the shaded zone can be driven with less power than the unshaded area.

The patent notes that photodiodes can also gather information about individual OLEDs or pixel groupings, measuring their output against a reference signal or other OLEDs with known outputs. If an OLED is determined to be aged and is no longer reproducing colors or brightness in concert with surrounding diodes, the controller can drive that specific component at a different strength to compensate.

OLED
Cross section view of possible OLED layout.


The inclusion of photodiodes can also be used to make the display more useful. For example, the system can take the place of current proximity sensors, creating space for additional components. In one embodiment, the patent application notes that photodiode-equipped screen may only shut off those OLEDs that are directly obscured by a user when the device is up to their ear, leaving the rest active.

Apple's OLED panel with photodiodes patent application was first filed for in 2012 and credits Stephen Brian Lynch, Paul Stephen Drzaic, Benjamin Mark Rappoport, Fletcher R. Rothkopf, John Patrick Ternus and Scott Andrew Myers as its inventors.
post #2 of 8
go Apple !

I remember MANY years ago, working with the Apple LISA, what an aweseom machine for its time. Automatic screen dim, black text on white background, Windows, icons menus that you could move with a mouse, everything built into the one box. WAY ahead of its time. If only Apple has patented a lot of it's stuff back then, they would have been leaps ahead of all other PC's. I can understand why Apple are doing this now. It's not about technology, it's about delivering a user experience, a pleasant one. Don't let those cheap imitations get you down!
post #3 of 8
So does this mean Apple is prepping OLED for future iPhones? I thought Tim Cook hated OLED tech. He said OLED display are dim, over saturated and have short life span. Maybe they will make first perfect OLED display. That could be breakthrough In display technology. I can see Apple starting display wars for image perfection just like they did with iPhone 4's high pixel density display back in 2010.
post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by mir808 View Post

So does this mean Apple is prepping OLED for future iPhones? I thought Tim Cook hated OLED tech. He said OLED display are dim, over saturated and have short life span. Maybe they will make first perfect OLED display. That could be breakthrough In display technology. I can see Apple starting display wars for image perfection just like they did with iPhone 4's high pixel density display back in 2010.

The thing with technology, you need to constantly be looking forward. Even if it may not seem like a good display now, it is very well likely, that it will be tomorrow.

Apple seems to hate OLED technology at the moment (I agree with them, however, I can see why people think the screens are so nice).

I think Apple should go IGZO and see what comes after that.

post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seankill View Post

The thing with technology, you need to constantly be looking forward. Even if it may not seem like a good display now, it is very well likely, that it will be tomorrow.

Except that by 'tomorrow', QD displays will render LCD and OLED pointless.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #6 of 8

Like Apple owning a patent matters /s

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

Like Apple owning a patent matters /s

It doesn't. Google will just tell Congress that it is obvious and "standards essential" and demand seizure of Apple's patents. And the apologists will say this invention is too important for any one company to own. Or failing that, post photos of rounded rectangles.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #8 of 8
Quote:
It doesn't. Google will just tell Congress that it is obvious and "standards essential" and demand seizure of Apple's patents. And the apologists will say this invention is too important for any one company to own. Or failing that, post photos of rounded rectangles.

 

I'm sorry, but Google never argued for seizure of Apple's patents in any way, shape or form.

 

In any case, don't get me started on the rounded rectangles thing.  

 

1wink.gif  See what I did there?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Apple's OLED display patent uses embedded sensors to adjust for shadows, diode age