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Caught by iPad cannibalization, Apple, Inc. gambles on Mac inventory safeguards - Page 2

post #41 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


It is a shame the 30" ACD was discontinued. I wonder with the new Mac Pro Apple might re introduced a real man sized screen? 1smoking.gif

THAT would be the 4K screen. Something the new Mac Pro can handle more then one of at a time. Of course they come with a real man-sized price tag.

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post #42 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

If we could get a MacBook Air with cellular data we could dump the iPad altogether, especially if it supported SMS text messaging. Then all I'd need is a simple, voice-only telephone (iPhone 5C?).

You could always use a USB stick for cellular data. Not as convenient, of course, but if it saves carrying an iPad. The problem is the cost - I wonder if Netzero or Straight Talk support USB cellular.
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

It is a shame the 30" ACD was discontinued. I wonder with the new Mac Pro Apple might re introduced a real man sized screen? 1smoking.gif

I suspect that the demand for a screen that size is tiny. Sure, for professionals, it's great, but for most people, even 27" is huge. In fact, I'm looking at the iMac and wondering if I should just stick with the 21" because the 27" is so freaking huge.
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post #43 of 103

Perhaps there would be less cannibalization of Apple's line up if there were a few more moves to leverage the success of the iPhone and iPad.

 

I would like Apple to consider is adding either an emulation layer to run iPhone software on a Mac or adding an ARM chip to the system so Macs could run all the software in an iPhone out of the box. This would help development and add lots of new software options to Macs.  Emulating PC software on a Mac to make Web services work is just painful.  By now many of these types of software have been made into Apps so they are native to the OS.   The iPhone software has the potential of making the old dashboard into a really useful feature not merely eye candy.  Not to mention how much this would lower basic software add ons or make properly packaged and vetted open source software into $1 apps.

 

Am I the only person who believes that a greatly simplified PC with custom built in graphics would be an awesome product between a Mac Mini and a Mac Pro?  The new 760 chip from nVidia is plenty of graphics for the next 4 years and if it were put into an inclosure smaller than the new MacPro and bigger than Mac Mini it would be worth the extra $250 for the computer.

post #44 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


You could always use a USB stick for cellular data. Not as convenient, of course, but if it saves carrying an iPad. The problem is the cost - I wonder if Netzero or Straight Talk support USB cellular.
I suspect that the demand for a screen that size is tiny. Sure, for professionals, it's great, but for most people, even 27" is huge. In fact, I'm looking at the iMac and wondering if I should just stick with the 21" because the 27" is so freaking huge.

a 32-inch 4K monitor, using an IGZO panel, paired with the new Mac Pro would be a beast of a system.

post #45 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

You could always use a USB stick for cellular data.

 

I would, but Canadian carriers aren't offering them anymore. Instead they sell "Personal Hotspots" that allow multiple users to share the LTE bandwidth wirelessly but require AC power and are comparatively large.

 

I was willing to change carriers just to do exactly what you suggest, but NONE of them support USB sticks anymore.

 

UPDATE: It appears Bell is now offering them again (they weren't when I checked a couple months ago), but the word is the performance is so bad I'd be better off tethering to an LTE phone.


Edited by v5v - 8/4/13 at 3:40pm
post #46 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macnewsjunkie View Post

Am I the only person who believes that a greatly simplified PC with custom built in graphics would be an awesome product between a Mac Mini and a Mac Pro?

 

No, I agree. I know the iMac is supposed fill that category but I can't use it. The computer sits on a shelf connected to the TV, so aside from a built-in display being redundant there's just no room for it. There's room for something bigger than a Mini though.

post #47 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

No, I agree. I know the iMac is supposed fill that category {computer between the Mini and the Mac Pro} but I can't use it. The computer sits on a shelf connected to the TV, so aside from a built-in display being redundant there's just no room for it. There's room for something bigger than a Mini though.

I think you're asking the wrong question. Instead of "why doesn't Apple offer a monitor-less computer between the Mini and the Pro?", why not ask "what need is there for a monitor-less computer between the Mini and the Pro?"

What won't the Mini do that you need it to do?
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post #48 of 103

The headline reads: "Caught by iPad cannibalization, Apple, Inc. gambles on Mac inventory safeguards"

 

The thought that Apple doesn't know it's inventory depletion rate and manages it effectively as part of it's overall marketing plan is simply silly.

 

"Caught & gambles"?  Who is writing this rubbish for Apple Insider?

post #49 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I wonder (as though it's not obvious) which Macs are being cannibalized the most.

I said it seven years ago: desktops and tablets are the future.

 

It's only one subjective data point, but what I've seen over the last five years is:

 

- basically *zero* MacPros being bought at all anymore

- big decline in iMacs.

- huge, huge decline in MacBook Pro's

- zero Mac mini's (down from close to zero to begin with though).

 

It's almost all MacBook Air's now. Not too long ago it was all MacBook Pros, in various sizes (with some iMacs in various sizes because they were cheaper for the lower status workers), now it's almost all standard, 11" MacBook Airs.  The only real growth has been in Apple displays which basically work as docking ports for the MacBook Airs.  Part of the iMac decline is almost certainly because they last so damn long now though.  Once you buy one for an office environment you don't need to upgrade or do anything to it for four years or so. 

 

Almost everyone who previously went for a MacBook Pro now goes for an Air, and about half of those that used to get an iMac do as well. 

post #50 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


… Sure, for professionals, it's great, but for most people, even 27" is huge. In fact, I'm looking at the iMac and wondering if I should just stick with the 21" because the 27" is so freaking huge.

 

I still use a 30" ACD at home and it is a bit too big sometimes.  

 

The thing that keeps me using it is I much prefer the 16:10 aspect ratio that Apple used to use for everything until it caved to conformity and switched to 16:9.  I'm sure it's days are numbered though.  They barely work with the new OS and are not suitable for the average consumer at all anymore.  

 

It seems clear to me that Apple simply must come out with a new monitor for the new Mac Pro when it comes out as the current Thunderbolt one just won't do at all, especially for professionals.  

So I'm thinking that later this year or early next there will be some interesting new options in that department perhaps. 

post #51 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1983 View Post

Enough with all this! I just want Apple to finally release new Haswell rMBP's and iMacs yesterday!

Serious question: what's so great about the Haswell, compared to, say, i7?
post #52 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

I think you're asking the wrong question. Instead of "why doesn't Apple offer a monitor-less computer between the Mini and the Pro?", why not ask "what need is there for a monitor-less computer between the Mini and the Pro?"

 

Ask not what Apple can do for you, ask what you can do for Apple?

 

But seriously, fair point. Perhaps there is no need. There are a couple of minor issues with the current mini that could be overcome simply by making the case a little larger, but nothing that would make the difference between me buying a Mac and not.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

What won't the Mini do that you need it to do?

 

Nothing.

 

It would be nice if it had better pixel pushing power. If I played games on my computer using my TV as a display, it'd be a big jump from a mini to a Pro.

 

I'd also like to have easier access to the drive because drives wear out, and the ones Apple provide are poopy so I always replace them. Of course in this respect the current model is already miles ahead of the iMac, I'd just like it to be as easy as it is with the MacBooks.

 

It would also be nice if it didn't get so loud when actually working hard. If less emphasis were placed on making it micromini perhaps a way could be found to make it quieter. Or maybe not. I dunno.

 

Finally a little issue that's the subject of much debate around here: I'm one of those few who still has to regularly use optical media. I have a little external unit but honestly I'd rather have a conventional 5.25" drive inside the machine. It's just easier (the little outboards are a PITA) and provides better performance at a much lower cost.

 

Bottom line: No major objections, just little things. If there's room in the Mac lineup for a machine that addresses those little things, that would be nice. If not, no big deal. I'm not dissatisfied with the status quo.

post #53 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Well, with tablets on the go and around the house, what purpose is there to a laptop? Having said that, people will still need something with more power than their tablet, and so since it wouldn't be moving anyway, why take a weaker stationary laptop over a powerful desktop? That desktop, then, can also manage the automated features of the home, both when you're there and when you're away. 'Course that last bit I've only added in the last, oh, two years.

Desktops, of course, are also going to go multitouch. Since they don't have to move, large touchscreens are feasible.

Laptops allow you to take your home computer with you anywhere you go, something that a tablet can not do, plus they don't require a proper desk (the living room table is perfectly fine) and can disappear from view when not needed.  Hiding a desktop is comparatively much harder.  Furthermore, they come with their own UPSes and, if you buy a Thunderbolt Display, Wireless Keyboard, and Magic Mouse / Trackpad, you can have the full iMac experience with an additional monitor with a laptop.  The only downside to laptops is their cost; everything else are upsides; even storage is no longer an issue anymore, just buy a Thunderbolt drive or create some partitions in an AirPort Express, AirPort Extreme, or AirPort Time Capsule and the storage problem goes away when you're home.

 

Currently I have a MacBook Pro as only personal computer and an iPad as my Internet connection (unlimited data plan at 42mbps); I can take my personal computer anywhere I go and access the net wherever I am without even needing an AC outlet, and at home I can plug it to external peripherals to have the full desktop experience, with an additional display.  Had an iMac before, but never again.  If I ever buy another desktop, it will be a PC for the customization potential.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

 

If we could get a MacBook Air with cellular data we could dump the iPad altogether, especially if it supported SMS text messaging. Then all I'd need is a simple, voice-only telephone (iPhone 5C?).

Personally, I'm thinking about replacing the unlimited plan that I have on my iPad for another unlimited plan on my iPhone, because I've just discovered while reading my contract that these data plans also support voice calls (although those are paid, I don't make enough voice calls for that to be a concern).  Still need to think, though, because I take the iPad everywhere I take the MacBook Pro and I still want cellular data on the iPad, even if not unlimited.

post #54 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by tribalogical View Post

 

I'm doing something similar. Have decided that an iPad Mini + iPhone 5 + 13" MBA is the perfect toolkit. Those three devices together will satisfy 100% of my mobile and biz needs. I can shoot and edit photos & video, manage listings, edit/print all the standard forms, etc. (MLS and ZipForms on an iPad Mini? Really?) And you can do all that pretty much anywhere. Clients love it when you can pull up extra info while showing (even alternate properties) on the fly.  I considered the 11" MBA for about 30 seconds. I don't care for the 16:9 display format at that size, and the extra screen real estate on the 13" just makes everything so much more usable and comfortable for extended sessions...

 

We're using iCloud and Dropbox a lot for managing file sharing. Looking forward to using Airdrop across all devices too.

 

The tools of the future here today! :D

I think u maybe right on the 13" thx! :)

post #55 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by netrox View Post

I bought MacBook Air and returned it back a week later. Why? I have iPad 3 and I do a lot of web surfing and reading on iPad. I also have Mac Mini and it performs well. I don't think MacBook Air is worth it despite being beautifully designed and well built.

I'd rather have a cheap Wintel laptop since I rarely use a notebook.

 

 

So why did you buy the Air if you rarely use a notebook and didn't think it was worth the price? 

 

Sounds like you are simply an annoying customer taking advantage of the system simply because you can.

post #56 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

 

I know that's the case for me -- I haven't updated my aged MacBook Pro or iPhone because I don't care for the current offerings -- but I always I assumed I was the only one. Is anyone else thumbing their nose at what Apple sells now and waiting to see if the next redesign is better?

 

I'm honestly curious- what is it that you're looking for exactly in "current offerings", and what would it take to update your aged Macbook Pro? This sounds strange, because objectively speaking Apple's notebook line is leaps and bounds beyond what it was a few years ago, and much improved in every single respect (speed/power, display, weight, size, ports, OS, battery life, etc), especially the Macbook Pro. And both the Air and the Pro are considered the best products in their respective categories. So, maybe you can make a list of what you'd like in Apple's notebook line, or what you'd like them to do? It's one thing if you're completely satisfied with your old machine and don't need to upgrade. But not being impressed with their current offerings seems a little irrational, so I wonder what it is specifically you're looking for. 

post #57 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

 

I'm honestly curious- what is it that you're looking for exactly in "current offerings", and what would it take to update your aged Macbook Pro? This sounds strange, because objectively speaking Apple's notebook line is leaps and bounds beyond what it was a few years ago, and much improved in every single respect (speed/power, display, weight, size, ports, OS, battery life, etc), especially the Macbook Pro. And both the Air and the Pro are considered the best products in their respective categories. So, maybe you can make a list of what you'd like in Apple's notebook line, or what you'd like them to do? It's one thing if you're completely satisfied with your old machine and don't need to upgrade. But not being impressed with their current offerings seems a little irrational, so I wonder what it is specifically you're looking for. 

 

For what it's worth "v5v" is a noted troll on this site and is just trying to be as contrary as possible here.  

They change their opinion week to week based on whatever is the most negative, and thus can't be really said to have an actual opinion per se.  

You say white, they say black, you say up they say down, etc. 

 

As you noted, in this case they are arguing that one of the best and most popular laptops available in the entire history of laptop computers, as well as the most popular smartphone ever made (one that actually defines the modern smartphone category) are both somehow not up to snuff.  

 

More than a little irrational. 1rolleyes.gif

post #58 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

You could always use a USB stick for cellular data. Not as convenient, of course, but if it saves carrying an iPad. The problem is the cost - I wonder if Netzero or Straight Talk support USB cellular.
I suspect that the demand for a screen that size is tiny. Sure, for professionals, it's great, but for most people, even 27" is huge. In fact, I'm looking at the iMac and wondering if I should just stick with the 21" because the 27" is so freaking huge.

I used to have two 30" side by side whilst editing ESPN shows, now alas a single 27" in semi retirement. I really enjoyed the real estate to be honest.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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post #59 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

not not being impressed with their current offerings seems a little irrational, so I wonder what it is specifically you're looking for. 

 

"A little?" Clearly you don't know me at all! I'm completely irrational!

 

I just wrote a diatribe explaining my situation in detail but deleted it after realizing that, in addition to being TL;DR, no one really cares.

 

Suffice to say that I think the move to an in-house form factor for storage is a bad idea, many of the apps I use are not yet retina-optimized, and part of me still clings desperately to the faint hope that somehow someday Apple will resurrect the 17" screen.

 

The machine I have now was as close as doesn't matter to $4000 after AppleCare and taxes and the current equivalent is still around $3600. For me that's a lotta dough so I just wanna be REALLY sure I'm gonna be REALLY happy before I pull the trigger! I suppose I could just buy a $2500 non-retina model like my wife just did, but I don't know if I'd be any happier with that than what I have now.

 

As for the phone, I'm just waiting as long as I possibly can in the hope they make one that looks like the HTC One. Damn, that thing looks good!

post #60 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by tribalogical View Post

I'm doing something similar. Have decided that an iPad Mini + iPhone 5 + 13" MBA is the perfect toolkit. Those three devices together will satisfy 100% of my mobile and biz needs. I can shoot and edit photos & video, manage listings, edit/print all the standard forms, etc. (MLS and ZipForms on an iPad Mini? Really?) And you can do all that pretty much anywhere. Clients love it when you can pull up extra info while showing (even alternate properties) on the fly.  I considered the 11" MBA for about 30 seconds. I don't care for the 16:9 display format at that size, and the extra screen real estate on the 13" just makes everything so much more usable and comfortable for extended sessions...

We're using iCloud and Dropbox a lot for managing file sharing. Looking forward to using Airdrop across all devices too.

The tools of the future here today! 1biggrin.gif

Don't do the MBA- spend the extra $300 or whatever it will cost and get the rMBP or even the standard pro. The MBA is a wonderful device, but for photo editing- the screen is very bad. The resolution is phenomenal, but the color changes with even the slightest angle change. It's widely known. The air is amazing for everything except photo editing.

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2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air, iPad Mini Retina, (2) iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
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post #61 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

It's only one subjective data point, but what I've seen over the last five years is:

- basically *zero* MacPros being bought at all anymore
- big decline in iMacs.
- huge, huge decline in MacBook Pro's
- zero Mac mini's (down from close to zero to begin with though).

It's almost all MacBook Air's now. Not too long ago it was all MacBook Pros, in various sizes (with some iMacs in various sizes because they were cheaper for the lower status workers), now it's almost all standard, 11" MacBook Airs.  The only real growth has been in Apple displays which basically work as docking ports for the MacBook Airs.  Part of the iMac decline is almost certainly because they last so damn long now though.  Once you buy one for an office environment you don't need to upgrade or do anything to it for four years or so. 

Almost everyone who previously went for a MacBook Pro now goes for an Air, and about half of those that used to get an iMac do as well. 

After the 13" rMBP gets announced- even if JUST Haswell and intel 5000/5100 are included- I don't know why anyone would pick the air for a measly $400 (128gb) difference or $200 (256gb). And that's if they don't drop the price. That 13" rMBP is gonna be amazing.

2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air, iPad Mini Retina, (2) iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

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2012 27" iMac i7, 2010 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air, iPad Mini Retina, (2) iPhone 5S, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

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post #62 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Serious question: what's so great about the Haswell, compared to, say, i7?

Basically is way more energy efficient. That's why the new Airs have all day battery now. Also for the rMBP, it's expected to get better integrated graphics.
post #63 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

It's only one subjective data point, but what I've seen over the last five years is:

 

- basically *zero* MacPros being bought at all anymore

- big decline in iMacs.

- huge, huge decline in MacBook Pro's

- zero Mac mini's (down from close to zero to begin with though).

 

It's almost all MacBook Air's now. Not too long ago it was all MacBook Pros, in various sizes (with some iMacs in various sizes because they were cheaper for the lower status workers), now it's almost all standard, 11" MacBook Airs.  The only real growth has been in Apple displays which basically work as docking ports for the MacBook Airs.  Part of the iMac decline is almost certainly because they last so damn long now though.  Once you buy one for an office environment you don't need to upgrade or do anything to it for four years or so. 

 

Almost everyone who previously went for a MacBook Pro now goes for an Air, and about half of those that used to get an iMac do as well. 

From your post it feels like they don't sell shit anymore. Maybe there is no need to blow things out of proportions?

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post #64 of 103

I completely agree, I have a 2011 Macbook Pro and, although I'd love a retina display, I still use the Firewire port, the IR receiver and I like the dedicated graphics for video editing so I don't currently have an upgrade path. Apple had a great opportunity to gain market share while Windows users dithered over WIndows 8 but instead of tempting them with an aggressively priced, highly functional  alternative they reduced the functionality and raised the price. Bad call.

post #65 of 103
I wonder what would happen if Apple decided to offer their hardware for about $100 to $200 cheaper per desktop and laptop and sold OS X as an optional Operating system to be used only on Apple hardware. Would people buy them and install another OS, or would they still install OS X.

I know they won't do it, but I've always wondered what would happen if they did. I would still buy OS X and run OS X as would everyone that prefers OS X, but would they sell more systems if LInux and Windows people still wanted to only run those OSs and choose Apple hardware at a slightly reduced amount because the OS was unbundled. Obviously, Apple wouldn't be the OS supplier or give suppert for the other OS's but still offer hardware support.
post #66 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by karmadave View Post

I think what this demonstrates is that Apple is not immune to the new realities of the personal computer market. The market is forecast to contract at least another 10% and they simply don't want to want to get stuck with unsold inventory. Intel's release of Haswell has been staggered with full availability not expected until the Fall. This is the primary reason Apple's updated MBP's will not see the light of day until at least September. Apple, of course, is in a fairly strong strategic position (compared to HP, Dell, and others) due to their marketshare and profits in Smartphones and Tablets. Of course, Apple's challenge is not only updating Mac, but also their iOS devices which are under siege from the likes of Google and Samsung. All this, just to stay in the game. To continue on their path they also need to bring new, innovative products to market (TV's? Watches?). These are some of the challenges faced by Apple's management in the 'post-SJ' era...

 

If Apple wants to split its Mac fortunes with the ones of PC makers, they should leave the Intel in at least notebook and desktop segment and go further with ARM.

post #67 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post

 

Just yesterday we were talking about Apple immediately selling everything they make as fast as they can make it. I guess we were wrong.

 

The context was a co-worker and me wanting Apple to make some design changes, but feeling that it was unlikely it will ever happen because you can't argue with success. Now I wonder...

 

Is it possible that declining sales of certain products are NOT the result of cannibalization by the iPad, but rather buyers just not being happy with the current offerings? I know that's the case for me -- I haven't updated my aged MacBook Pro or iPhone because I don't care for the current offerings -- but I always I assumed I was the only one. Is anyone else thumbing their nose at what Apple sells now and waiting to see if the next redesign is better?

Apple isn't really innovating these days. They bought Siri. They got Thunderbold from Intel. They buy software companies to integrate their products into Apple products. I guess they innovated with the quieter laptop fans and the sapphire phone screens.

 

It seems the Macs are becoming entertainment devices with the app stores and games. I'm awaiting something new and different from Apple. I've given up on their computer products. I don't need a smart TV that can be hacked and I don't need a watch that does anything but tell time and have a timer with an alarm. I would love to get an iPod Touch but for about $200 less than the price charged for the 64 GB version. I could get an unlocked Galaxy S III phone with a 64 GB memory card for just $20 more than the iPod Touch.

 

I'm doing more on a desktop these days. If I ever go mobile I'll probably use a big screen smart phone and not a laptop or tablet. I'm fortunate in that I don't need to be mobile for my computer usage. I can buy less expensive hardware and put GNU/Linux on it and do great work.

post #68 of 103
This has been discussed here before, but IMO the biggest hole in Apple's line-up is a family-friendly Home Entertainment server, with an iOS app to easily configure it and to add to it. A personal/family "headless" iCloud computer, possibly built on the current Mac Mini platform.

Re: Desktop and Laptop PCs Dying a slow death.

I think the above needs to be broken down to:
a) students, professionals, enterprise users;
b) home, consumer and casual users.

A - The fact that PCs are are far more powerful and last longer today than say even 5 years ago, there is simply no need to upgrade. Windows: many business can't and/or won't upgrade because it's simply not needed, and the Windows 8 catastrophe is keeping the others from running out to purchase anything new at this time.

On the Apple side, just about anything from Mid 2009 until today is more than sufficient for most people's needs. Add some more RAM and possibly an SSD drive, and many are blown by those small and inexpensive improvements.

This category of user is not going away... but they are being pragmatic with their investment money because their is no compelling reason to buy anything new at this time for the vast majority of them.

B - This is where the desktop/laptop/PC business is seriously dying (dead already?).

I was at a birthday party on Saturday of about 60 people, many of them clients and their families that I have the opportunity to mingle with outside of work once a year. A somewhat large portion have purchased their first smart phone or tablet since we last saw each other a year ago. The not surprising tale: they love their mobile devices; hate their PCs/LTs and rarely use them anymore unless they absolutely must. Many see absolutely no reason whatsoever to purchase a new PC.... some going so far as to say, "in their lifetime".

Pretty amazing watching them all enjoying videos, pictures, web sites, etc. and not being afraid of the device in their hands. That was always the main thing I had to" teach" Wintel to Apple converters: stop being afraid of your computer. The PC was always a fear-filled experience for the average person for a multitude of reasons, but was a necessity many felt they had to live with to be "connected".

With the advent of these instant on, easy to use computers in your pocket... and in the case of iOS devices, 99% secure... it really is no wonder why people are gravitating towards them in droves.

I don't think it's too far fetched to predict that a very large majority of households will not replace their PCs at all in the future, and will rather upgrade their mobile devices every 2-3 years. I'm talking as high as ~75%. The "wiggle room" is for those that "really" need the power for film and picture editing and assorted business tasks that can't be accomplished efficiently on a mobile device. However, that dilemma is also changing quickly, so who knows? In 3 years we just may have docks, home servers, whatever that facilitates "big screen" computing. Heck, we're more than halfway there already if you think about it.

NOTE: a lot of people inquiring about the Chromecast(!) For those outside of the Apple gadget arena... gotta be honest... that inexpensive little device is revolutionary for many home and technophobic users!
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post #69 of 103
Quote:
I have an aging original intel iMac which I am using less and less because it has SL and iCloud is problematic. A little iWeb updating is about all I do on it. I'm in the process of switching to a web based free site offered by my hosting service. As much as I love iWeb, it's starting to look a little dated. 

 

 

You should look into Adobe Muse, I've left iWeb behind a long time ago, and since starting learning how to use Muse since the launch of the Adobe Creative Cloud!

post #70 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

Well, I for one, am doing my best to run my real estate business from my iPhone 4s and and an iPad Mini only.


I have an aging original intel iMac which I am using less and less because it has SL and iCloud is problematic. A little iWeb updating is about all I do on it. I'm in the process of switching to a web based free site offered by my hosting service. As much as I love iWeb, it's starting to look a little dated. 

I agree. iWeb is pretty outdated and suffers from one major problem. Once you start a project in iWeb, you can't easily modify it with any other program. It would be really nice if you could export it as html code.

I also switched to a free web-based site. For my purposes, it's more than adequate, although that clearly won't work for everyone. After a bit of searching, the best one I found was:
http://www.wix.com
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post #71 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

This has been discussed here before, but IMO the biggest hole in Apple's line-up is a family-friendly Home Entertainment server, with an iOS app to easily configure it and to add to it. A personal/family "headless" iCloud computer, possibly built on the current Mac Mini platform.

What's wrong with the Mini for that application? The Mini Server is a quite capable home entertainment server:
http://www.apple.com/mac-mini/server/
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post #72 of 103
I think the future is a MacBook ThunderBolt display replacing desktops.
Almost everyone wants a notebook computer while very few need a desktop.

Apple should make more affordable ThunderBolt displays.
$999 is too steep for most consumers.
If they had a 21.5" ThunderBolt display for $500, lots of Mac Book owners would get it.
They should also offer it as a discounted desktop replacement bundle.
post #73 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumergo View Post

The headline reads: "Caught by iPad cannibalization, Apple, Inc. gambles on Mac inventory safeguards"

 

The thought that Apple doesn't know it's inventory depletion rate and manages it effectively as part of it's overall marketing plan is simply silly.

 

"Caught & gambles"?  Who is writing this rubbish for Apple Insider?

 

I'm not sure what's difficult to understand about that. Apple simply overestimated demand for their desktops and laptops. That's why they had fire sales to move a lot of inventory. But I guess since they managed (it appears) to clear the excess inventory by slashing prices and killing their margins, then that's managing it "effectively."
post #74 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

It is a shame the 30" ACD was discontinued. I wonder with the new Mac Pro Apple might re introduced a real man sized screen? 1smoking.gif

Sure hope they do! I bought the 30" when it was EOL'D but would really like a 2nd one. The 27" are too glossy for my taste, but I need to be carefull here before, whatshisname, Zunc, starts to thumb this post up¡


Getting a 4k display (or two) will also make me buy the new MP, even though I really don't need it.
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post #75 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


I suspect that the demand for a screen that size is tiny. Sure, for professionals, it's great, but for most people, even 27" is huge. In fact, I'm looking at the iMac and wondering if I should just stick with the 21" because the 27" is so freaking huge.

But it's more productive. And mind-blowing. And usefull, with three documents open, side by side.

http://www.tomsguide.com/us/30inch-LCD-monitors,review-1293.html

http://pfeifferreport.com/Cin_Disp30_Bench_Rep.pdf

A apple also wrote a great piece on the productivity of the 30". But alas, I can't find it.
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post #76 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post

Apple isn't really innovating these days. They bought Siri. They got Thunderbold from Intel. They buy software companies to integrate their products into Apple products. I guess they innovated with the quieter laptop fans and the sapphire phone screens.

It seems the Macs are becoming entertainment devices with the app stores and games. I'm awaiting something new and different from Apple. I've given up on their computer products. I don't need a smart TV that can be hacked and I don't need a watch that does anything but tell time and have a timer with an alarm. I would love to get an iPod Touch but for about $200 less than the price charged for the 64 GB version. I could get an unlocked Galaxy S III phone with a 64 GB memory card for just $20 more than the iPod Touch.

I'm doing more on a desktop these days. If I ever go mobile I'll probably use a big screen smart phone and not a laptop or tablet. I'm fortunate in that I don't need to be mobile for my computer usage. I can buy less expensive hardware and put GNU/Linux on it and do great work.

All large tech companies buy smaller ones for different reasons, this has nothing to do with being innovative or not. What other company has reinvented or defined while product categories like Apple? Horrible attempt at trolling. Come up with something new.
post #77 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

I wonder what would happen if Apple decided to offer their hardware for about $100 to $200 cheaper per desktop and laptop and sold OS X as an optional Operating system to be used only on Apple hardware. Would people buy them and install another OS, or would they still install OS X.

I know they won't do it, but I've always wondered what would happen if they did. I would still buy OS X and run OS X as would everyone that prefers OS X, but would they sell more systems if LInux and Windows people still wanted to only run those OSs and choose Apple hardware at a slightly reduced amount because the OS was unbundled. Obviously, Apple wouldn't be the OS supplier or give suppert for the other OS's but still offer hardware support.

Apple sells a platform not generic hardware. It would cheapen the brand reducing them to just another hardware vendor. If you want Windows or Linux, you have plenty of choices. Just buy one of those MacBook Air copies from Asus or the like and you have your Windows or Linux machine.
post #78 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


But it's more productive. And mind-blowing. And usefull, with three documents open, side by side.

http://www.tomsguide.com/us/30inch-LCD-monitors,review-1293.html

http://pfeifferreport.com/Cin_Disp30_Bench_Rep.pdf

A apple also wrote a great piece on the productivity of the 30". But alas, I can't find it.


The problem I always encounter with the largest screens is one of managing that amount of space, both in mouse or tablet mapping and the issue of potentially overlapping windows. If I just need to glance at something for reference, it's easier to use a second display. rather than deal with overlap. I don't think you could everything to work well in the space provided by an ipad though. There are some things that just don't work well in its current form outside of those that are cpu/gpu bound. It makes interaction better for some things, worse for others. For example I could deal with way more typing a physical keyboard than an ipad. It works on an ipad, but I wouldn't want to go through hours of it. 


Edited by hmm - 8/5/13 at 9:35am
post #79 of 103
At the Siggraph conference two weeks ago I had a number of conversations with companies on the show floor about the lack of significant performance increases at the top end of desktop PCs. The consensus is that all of the R&D efforts at Intel and other companies is now going into lower power and higher performance mobile products and that the desktop computer platform is going to disappear as a mass market product. Those of us that must use computers instead of mobile devices like iPads, such as developers or media content creators, will have to pay a lot more for our computers in coming years.

Currently the cost of our high performance computers is subsidized by the mass market. We can pick up low priced computers from retail companies like Frys or web sites like NewEgg for between $1000 and $2000. With the disappearance of the mass market, we will can expect to return to the situation as it was in the early 1990s where we would spend many thousands of dollars for a new high end computer.

This will effect Apple as well. Many people expect OS X to become more like iOS. It may instead get replaced by it for most customers. An iOS tablet with a keyboard and dock is nearly a computer already. It just needs a real file system and it would be able to do everything that a desktop computer can do now for most users. I expected to see that in iOS 7 but I guess it will be another year before we will see full computing capability in iOS.

The challenge for Apple will be getting Xcode to run on iOS. I imagine a cloud based development system in which any 4K display can become your monitor. Just grab a keyboard and mouse, log in and start working on your projects. This will become the model for all other productivity apps on iOS. I think that Apple is holding off releasing the file system until it can work seamlessly with iCloud. When even developers don't need to buy Mac Books and iMacs to get their work done, that will mark the end of desktop computers for just about everyone.
post #80 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

I wonder what would happen if Apple decided to offer their hardware for about $100 to $200 cheaper per desktop and laptop and sold OS X as an optional Operating system to be used only on Apple hardware. Would people buy them and install another OS, or would they still install OS X.

I know they won't do it, but I've always wondered what would happen if they did. I would still buy OS X and run OS X as would everyone that prefers OS X, but would they sell more systems if LInux and Windows people still wanted to only run those OSs and choose Apple hardware at a slightly reduced amount because the OS was unbundled. Obviously, Apple wouldn't be the OS supplier or give suppert for the other OS's but still offer hardware support.

 

Easily one of the worst ideas of "Apple should do this" that I've ever read... and I've read quite a few. This would be an absurdly ridiculous move, on so many levels, and for so many reasons. Most of which is the fact that Apple sells an ecosystem with each of their products, designed to serve as a halo for their other products. Getting users on OSX is even more important than selling them the hardware. The 2nd major fail is asking users to install OSX themselves. This added "option" infinitely increases complexity for the user, dilutes the brand, and serves no real purpose. It's very easy for those that want to make a bootcamp partition to do so. 

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