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CBS spat with Time Warner Cable extends outage to network's official iPad, iPhone apps

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
A contract dispute between CBS and Time Warner Cable has prevented millions of customers not only from viewing CBS channels on their television set, but also through the network's official applications for iPad and iPhone.

CBS


The dispute caused Time Warner to block CBS and Showtime networks over the weekend. CBS responded in kind, and blocked Time Warner Cable Internet subscribers from streaming its programming from its website.

But that IP ban also extends to the official iOS applications from CBS. Even though CBS is available free over the air, Time Warner customers who attempt to stream shows through the CBS application for iOS are presented with a video urging them to call their cable provider and side with the network.

"Time Warner Cable has dropped CBS," a 45-second video airing in place of content proclaims. "That means no 'Under the Dome,' no 'Big Brother,' no 'NCIS,' no NFL, or PGA Championship, or US Open Tennis. No 'Big Bang Theory,' no '60 Minutes.' Say no to Time Warner Cable."

The outage also extends to Showtime, which includes the original series "Dexter," "Ray Donovan," and "Homeland." And it includes Bright House Networks, a major regional cable operator that partners with Time Warner.

The current blackout is said to affect about 3 million Time Warner Cable customers in major markets including New York City, Los Angeles, Boston and Dallas. Among the events blocked was Tiger Woods' commanding victory at the Bridgestone Invitational.

In addition, the start of National Football League preseason football is this week, and CBS owns the broadcast rights to the league's American Football Conference teams, such as the New England Patriots and New York Jets.
post #2 of 31
Screw cable and satellite TV. My antenna works better than both.
post #3 of 31
That CBS is blocking TimeWarner internet customers from accessing their website seems to flaunt the spirit of Net Neutrality. Not all TW customers actually subscribe to TV programming, some only subscribe to internet. To suggest that an ISP is responsible for some kind of payment to a content provider is absurd, and contrary to the way the internet has been working since inception. Does CBS block access from .edu IP addresses, unless the institution pays a fee? I think not. This is absolutely wrong of CBS. They think they're being clever, but they are acting unethically and possibly illegally, IMO.
post #4 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by msuberly View Post

Screw cable and satellite TV. My antenna works better than both.

Completely irrelevant.  If you were a TimeWarner customer, CBS would be trying to block your antenna from working too.  But your neighbor who gets internet through a phone company DSL is allowed to watch CBS, even if they have TimeWarner television service.  CBS is discriminating based upon your ISP, and that should be illegal.

 

It's mafia-like in this respect.  It's like your auto mechanic refusing to service your vehicle because you bought gas from Chevron instead of Citgo. Or your grocery store refusing you entry because you dared to shop at Walmart last week.

 

PS: I won't do business with TimeWarner either, and I too have a nifty antenna that works.  But now I'm going to BOYCOTT CBS because of their action.  Good bye, advertisers.

post #5 of 31
Wow. NFL is already starting? As a Dallas fan... I hadn't been exactly counting the days 1smile.gif
post #6 of 31

I wonder how more time its going to take for the TV and Movie industry and the Cable industry before they realize they are screwed just like the music guys were back in early 2000's.

 

Physical media sales are down, video rental stores are almost all closed, lots of blockbusters are not making there cost at Theaters. Some of the renting went to cable on demand and other internet offering, but the size of bittorrent movies and TV shows is no longer an issue for home bandwidth.

 

Cable is getting competition from DSL over lived TV. People are getting used to stream pre-recorded content from the internet instead of watching live TV.

 

That market is going straigh to a major crisis.

post #7 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post

That CBS is blocking TimeWarner internet customers from accessing their website seems to flaunt the spirit of Net Neutrality. Not all TW customers actually subscribe to TV programming, some only subscribe to internet. To suggest that an ISP is responsible for some kind of payment to a content provider is absurd, and contrary to the way the internet has been working since inception. Does CBS block access from .edu IP addresses, unless the institution pays a fee? I think not. This is absolutely wrong of CBS. They think they're being clever, but they are acting unethically and possibly illegally, IMO.

supposedly ESPN has been doing just this since the 90's

post #8 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by herbapou View Post

I wonder how more time its going to take for the TV and Movie industry and the Cable industry before they realize they are screwed just like the music guys were back in early 2000's.

 

Physical media sales are down, video rental stores are almost all closed, lots of blockbusters are not making there cost at Theaters. Some of the renting went to cable on demand and other internet offering, but the size of bittorrent movies and TV shows is no longer an issue for home bandwidth.

 

Cable is getting competition from DSL over lived TV. People are getting used to stream pre-recorded content from the internet instead of watching live TV.

 

That market is going straigh to a major crisis.

completely different business models

music was always buy each album, then the greatest hits, etc

cable TV is paying for lots of content to watch only what you want

 

if you only pay for internet and pay for netflix and the other services you are close to the cost of a cable TV sub in the end

post #9 of 31
This is all a prelude.

One of these days, CBS is going to get bought out by TW (a la NBC-Comcast, and ABC-Disney).
post #10 of 31
Suck it, TWC. I've got a large roof antenna on a tall mast pointed directly towards midtown Manhattan and the signal strength is close to 100%. I get dozens of channels including CBS 2.1 and 2.2. I always knew it would come in handy after all these years I've had TWC. I checked to see what TWC had in CBS's place and they were showing STARZ Kids channel. No thanks. Now I'll just have to see if I can get some discount from TWC for taking CBS away. No point in paying for something they're not giving me.
post #11 of 31
Don't forget to call Time Warner and tell them you want compensation for the outage.
post #12 of 31
Why would anybody give a shit aout watching CBS? I dont understand this. Do any of the customers care?
post #13 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by echosonic View Post

Why would anybody give a shit aout watching CBS? I dont understand this. Do any of the customers care?

They do have the only three shows I watch on network TV: Big Bang Theory, Person of Interest, and Elementary.

 

But the Fall season hasn't started yet.....1biggrin.gif

post #14 of 31
I am all for Time Warner but they should lower their rate now in the affected markets since their costs just went down without having to pay for CBS.

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post #15 of 31

Just another argument for

1) turning cable into a big dumb pipe

2) bypassing both cable and network companies and go straight to the content producers on a per show basis

 

Netflix, iTunes, Amazon seem to be the likely players here, with Netflix being the rogue outsider.

 

I'm moving up to F.O. 25mbps next month (and 25mpbs upstream... may have to move to network backups;-) ),   at 20mbps, other than some skitchy sites, NetFlix, AppleTV and OTA... I'm doing okay.  25mbps and a better ISP (i hope... it appears I'll be 3 hops closer to the 'core') will be gravy.

post #16 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by msuberly View Post

Screw cable and satellite TV. My antenna works better than both.
Unfortunately, mine doesn't
post #17 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post

That CBS is blocking TimeWarner internet customers from accessing their website seems to flaunt the spirit of Net Neutrality. Not all TW customers actually subscribe to TV programming, some only subscribe to internet. To suggest that an ISP is responsible for some kind of payment to a content provider is absurd, and contrary to the way the internet has been working since inception. Does CBS block access from .edu IP addresses, unless the institution pays a fee? I think not. This is absolutely wrong of CBS. They think they're being clever, but they are acting unethically and possibly illegally, IMO.
Yes. Agree 100 percent. I would expect the Feds should look into this.

I have DirecTV and subscribe to all the CBS packages. My Internet is through TW, as that is the only option I have for high speed Internet in my area. So, I'm paying a premium to CBS for their programming on DirecTV, but can't access any of it online because I am forced to subscribe to TW for my ISP? My ISP has nothing to do with my programming packages, and I did have a choice for that and chose DirecTV, yet I'm still being punished?

The reality is, most people who subscribe to TW cable likely don't stream much if any of their programming over the internet.

I can see CBS' quandary ... as the big networks lose market share, they run the risk of pushing more users onto the Internet permanently with a move like this as people discover it as a viable option. But this is just wrong on so many levels.
post #18 of 31
Content creators are getting desperate and this clash, I expect, is one of many epic battles on the horizon. Media conglomerates are desperate to control content entirely, lest the end up like their pathetic music label partners. Their strangle-hold on content, arbitrary restrictions and excessive double-dipping is only going to get worse because their loosing their grip on the ultimate delivery system, the internet. Like the most manic heroin addict, big media has become far to addicted to ad revenue and would implode fantastically if it were ever turned off.

And what should the viewers really worry about? Not seeing their favorite CBS sitcom? No, they should be more concerned with the fact that big media continues to marginalize quality. Sure there are some great shows, e.g. Homeland. But how many times have you seen a great show run into the ground because of network marginalization? How many crappy spin-offs is Disney going to fleece from Pixar's great library? So far they have three, but you can bet there are more to come. Their not interested in making good content. Their not interested in making the world a better place. Their not interested in what you think. They're only interested in ad revenue and will use any method to secure it. Just like a manic heroin addict.

Luckily, the internet cannot be cornered so easily. More and more content will make it's way to consumers exclusively via the internet, while cable companies will become primarily internet providers. Bye, bye cable. Bye, bye old-fashioned telephone. I only hope independent content creators and producers will replace big media, and relegate big media to ad pimp status. It's easier than ever to make great content with cheap computers, and cheap video equipment. Jay Z and Beyonce did it, so what's stopping others from doing the same?

What do consumers want? They want what they want, when they want it. Why should we allow big media interfere with that, just so they can get their "20%" heroin fix? Why shouldn't we demand more from cable and networks? Why should they get to double-dip while we bear the burden?

Cable & Networks are two petulant children that both deserver to be booted from the game. Let's help them out.
post #19 of 31
Strangely, I'm blocked from watching CBS shows via their app as a Time Warner Cable customer, but our local CBS affiliate in Milwaukee is not owned by CBS and is not blacked out. I don't really care that much about it- but if I have to take a side, I'll side with the cable company. These ever increasing carraige fees are the reason pay TV keeps getting more and more expensive.
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post

Completely irrelevant.  If you were a TimeWarner customer, CBS would be trying to block your antenna from working too.  But your neighbor who gets internet through a phone company DSL is allowed to watch CBS, even if they have TimeWarner television service.  CBS is discriminating based upon your ISP, and that should be illegal.

It's mafia-like in this respect.  It's like your auto mechanic refusing to service your vehicle because you bought gas from Chevron instead of Citgo. Or your grocery store refusing you entry because you dared to shop at Walmart last week.

PS: I won't do business with TimeWarner either, and I too have a nifty antenna that works.  But now I'm going to BOYCOTT CBS because of their action.  Good bye, advertisers.


Your comment is irrelevant to his comment. He was simply expressing a sentiment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

completely different business models
music was always buy each album, then the greatest hits, etc
cable TV is paying for lots of content to watch only what you want

if you only pay for internet and pay for netflix and the other services you are close to the cost of a cable TV sub in the end

Cord Cutting:
  • $79/year Amazon Prime
  • $7.99/month Hulu Plus
  • $7.99/month Netflix
  • $46/month AT&T Internet (non-bundled) for Elite Internet (6mbps)


AT&T
  • $49 new activation
  • $64/month for U200 and Elite Internet (6mbps)
  • $10/month extra receiver
  • $10/month HD channels
  • $56/month increase after 12 months

Edited by MacBook Pro - 8/5/13 at 9:12am
post #21 of 31
IMO- this book sums up the industry pretty well. Captive Audience: The Telecom Industry and Monopoly Power in the New Gilded Age by Susan Crawford. She brings up things like natural monopoly, common carrier, public interest... stuff kind of left out of the discussion on... 'cable'!. http://www.amazon.com/Captive-Audience-Telecom-Industry-Monopoly/dp/0300153139/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top Author interview about the book on Cspan book tv http://www.booktv.org/Program/14736/After+Words+Susan+Crawford+Captive+Audience+The+Telecom+Industry+and+Monopoly+Power+in+the+New+Gilded+Age+hosted+by+Andrew+Blum+Wired+Magazine.aspx .
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post #22 of 31

CBS should go straight to iPad...and tell Time Warner to go eat it. 

post #23 of 31

If you're in NYC, and in some other parts of the country, another option is to dump TWC completely, except for your cable modem, and get your TV stations the modern way.

 

Check out aereo.com for all your basic over-the-air stations brought to you over the Internet. $8/mo for a HD picture that you can send to your TV via Apple TV or Roku. Plus you can record shows for later viewing.

post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by samdoohickey View Post

.... while cable companies will become primarily internet providers. .....br />



 

Bingo... the more and faster people realize this is just a basic 'pipe' and is a utility... like, electricity, water etc and for the public good; the sooner this will happen. If comcast et all where truely visionary, they would spin off the 'cable pipe' business. Firewall it(so to speak) then offer the content deal(s) seperate. But untill they are 'forced' to do it, they have a strangle hold. In Korea, Japan etc, the pipe is a utility, you pay for the basic internet pipe... then choose content provider packages. Wow... who would of thunk!!
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post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdonisSMU View Post

CBS should go straight to iPad...and tell Time Warner to go eat it. 


CBS would but they make a lot more money by charging the cable companies retransmission rights to carry its channels (CBS + Showtime). It has been reported that CBS wants $2 per cable subscriber.

post #26 of 31
Thankfully I just switched to Direct TV a couple of months ago and enjoy their service WAY more than TWC's. I found the quality of TWC's signal to be pretty bad no matter where I lived, whether it be LA or NY, and their prices to be atrocious.
Now I pay less money with Direct TV and can still watch CBS related shows both online and in demand and in HD, and the quality is great!
I do have TWC internet still, as it's still the best service I have experienced, but overall I do not like how TWC does business, and I'm trying to understand, how a dispute between TWC and CBS, results in losses for the customers. Now everyone who is a subscriber of TWC, is now losing out to programming that is normally free of charge over the airwaves. Why should the customers be punished? Not a great way to keep customers at all, when their is a huge movement to go away from cable all together.
If I were an existing customer, I'd switch like I did, or if you have good antenna reception; screw cable!
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenoz View Post

If you're in NYC, and in some other parts of the country, another option is to dump TWC completely, except for your cable modem, and get your TV stations the modern way.

 

Check out aereo.com for all your basic over-the-air stations brought to you over the Internet. $8/mo for a HD picture that you can send to your TV via Apple TV or Roku. Plus you can record shows for later viewing.

It is funny that Time Warner has recommended viewers get Aereo to get their CBS.

post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeaEarleGreyHot View Post

That CBS is blocking TimeWarner internet customers from accessing their website seems to flaunt the spirit of Net Neutrality. Not all TW customers actually subscribe to TV programming, some only subscribe to internet. To suggest that an ISP is responsible for some kind of payment to a content provider is absurd, and contrary to the way the internet has been working since inception. Does CBS block access from .edu IP addresses, unless the institution pays a fee? I think not. This is absolutely wrong of CBS. They think they're being clever, but they are acting unethically and possibly illegally, IMO.

Umm isn't it Time Warner that is blocking CBS? Hopefully CBS gives them the finger and streams over the internet and apps anyway. As soon as someone breaks free, the house of cable & satellite collapses. Sadly we don't have TW in Chicago, and even worse, because our local affiliate still broadcasts on VHF, many folk, me included, are not able to get them over the air. But I would love to see that CBS app inside my Apple TV, it would be all good!

post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by WisdomSeed View Post

Umm isn't it Time Warner that is blocking CBS? Hopefully CBS gives them the finger and streams over the internet and apps anyway. As soon as someone breaks free, the house of cable & satellite collapses. Sadly we don't have TW in Chicago, and even worse, because our local affiliate still broadcasts on VHF, many folk, me included, are not able to get them over the air. But I would love to see that CBS app inside my Apple TV, it would be all good!


Technically yes. CBS was allowing TWC to carry its signal while negotiating an increase in its retransmission fees (reportedly from $1 per subscriber to $2), forcing the issue into football season when is would be much more difficult to TWC to lose the channel. For $2 per cable subscriber, CBS isn't looking to enable the app that allows cord cutting.

post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post


Technically yes. CBS was allowing TWC to carry its signal while negotiating an increase in its retransmission fees (reportedly from $1 per subscriber to $2), forcing the issue into football season when is would be much more difficult to TWC to lose the channel. For $2 per cable subscriber, CBS isn't looking to enable the app that allows cord cutting.

Hmmm. I can see CBS trying to get their money since they are being carried by the cable company and also drawing viewers away from broadcast since they are bundled with the availability of so many other channels. However, if they were an app on Apple TV, even in competition with other over the air networks, Fox, NBC, ABC, and the local yokels (CW, Weigel Broadcasting), the lack of competition would compensate for the loss of cable since they would be selling advertisers more eyes, or at least not fewer eyes as they are getting with cable. Or they can wait until their over the air licenses expire and live streaming becomes a requirement of having OTA broadcast capabilities.

post #31 of 31
Not exactly on-topic.

So the networks are free-to-air broadcast and make money off ads and the rates are based on viewership?

TimeWarner and other cable companies all have two-way boxes now?

So why not instead of charging for rebroadcast rights, trade for real numbers of viewers? How many watched live? How many recorded it? How many watched on-demand?

The cable companies are surely keeping and keeping up with this data to help make decisions on which channels they should keep on their packages?

Seems like a win-win-win(the last win provided that the rates relax a bit for subscribers.) The networks have even better data to negotiate ad rates. The cable companies don't have to negotiate for rebroadcasting rights anymore.
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