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Samsung co-CEO pushes Tizen OS as more than a 'simple alternative for Android' - Page 4

post #121 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

As much as everyone wants to hate on Google, I bet many of you don't know that there are a number of (very!) influential developers at Google that absolutely HATE what has become of Android... let alone trying to program for the nasty Bastard-OS. No joke. Rubin is gone, and there are whispers of dissent whether Google should continue to try and shoe-horn services into a "layered cake" software, rather than go straight to "pure Chrome".

Maybe that's what should follow "Key lime pie": "Layered cake" lol.gif

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post #122 of 171
judging from what Motorola is doing, it wouldn't surprise me if one day Google just spit out a version of Android and Samsung did Tizen that was the extent of Android. HTC isn't making any money, NEC dumped their Android products, and I don't if anyone else is making any decent profits. Me too products generally don't last long.

Would you go into a line of business to only break even or make 1 to 5% net profit and never be able to be the market leader in control over the technology?
post #123 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soloman View Post

Same could be said about iOS and will become more prominent once iOS 7 gets released.

the same could not really be said of iOS
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post #124 of 171
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Originally Posted by iaeen View Post


Ok, so Meego is an iOS knockoff. What's your point?

Actually, MeeGo is a combination of Moblin and Maemo (public release in 2005). 

post #125 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by patpatpat View Post

It's $50 more on Google Play. His was got at full price in t-mobile store for $600, using their $25/week for 2 years purchase plan. Personally I think the extra $50 would have been worth it, since the only one available on play store is 16GB/White, which is the model he wanted anyhow.

Personally, I would have recommended the Google Edition of the HTC One over the Google Edition of the Galaxy S4.

 

Both of them already have the Android 4.3 update. If you can, root his device and install the Google Edition software as soon as possible.

 

The Nexus 4 going from 4.2.2 to 4.3 already had a nice performance jump (battery too). I could imagine the difference between stock 4.3 and Samsung's skinned 4.2.2 would be quite large. Android 4.3 also adds native GLES3 support, which is a nice perk.

post #126 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by snova View Post

I actually like them.. they just need to make the screen round too. /s

Or pear shaped. :-)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soloman View Post

Same could be said about iOS and will become more prominent once iOS 7 gets released.

Not at all.

1. iOS history is that previous apps almost always work flawlessly. The same is not true of Android.

2. With iOS, there is a vary fast transition to the newer OS so that you don't have the same fragmentation issues that Android faces.
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post #127 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

Actually a couple of million.  Similar to the number of Nexus fans.  Nexus 4 sold 1 million units, Nexus 7 sold 7 million units, and the Nexus 10 sold (they won't post the amount since it's too small of a number).

I've understood Nexus devices to be used to introduce new OS versions and hardware standards and not intended as high volume commercial successes. But perhaps MS was doing the same with the Surface.
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post #128 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


I've understood Nexus devices to be used to introduce new OS versions and hardware standards and not intended as high volume commercial successes. But perhaps MS was doing the same with the Surface.

Exactly this. Nexus and Surface devices are not made for mass production. Google and Microsoft are not trying to get into competition with their OEMs.

 

Google did a pretty good job with their Nexus line of devices, meanwhile Microsoft did just about everything wrong.

 

What Microsoft should have done was waited until this year to launch Surface devices running Windows 8.1. A Basic model using Intel's brand new Bay Trail architecture and a Pro model using fanless Haswell (Y-Series). This way they can be lightweight, offer a long battery life as well as the performance needed for a full version of Windows 8.1.

 

The push on Windows RT was destined for failure. ARM inside a tablet is a losing battle, X86 is here.

 

As a result, the Surface RT had a nice build, but horrible performance and a useless version of Windows.

 

Meanwhile, the Surface Pro used powerful hardware but forgot it was meant to be a tablet, ie. the kind of device made for mobile versatility.

post #129 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Or pear shaped. :-)
Not at all.

1. iOS history is that previous apps almost always work flawlessly. The same is not true of Android.

2. With iOS, there is a vary fast transition to the newer OS so that you don't have the same fragmentation issues that Android faces.

People with older devices can't find previous apps.
post #130 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soloman View Post

People with older devices can't find previous apps.

Do you mean newer apps? In any case 95% or more are on iOS 6.
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post #131 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by aross99 View Post

Is Tizen going to run Android Apps? If not, then aren't they going to face an uphill battle with developers who don't want to port their applications to a new OS? Without the core apps, who is going to buy these phones?

I agree that the more ecosystems the better for Apple, and I would love to see Samsung dump Android, but it seems like the lack of apps would be a huge issue for them...

I'm not so sure. Annecdotally, it seems likely that the bulk of Android customers barely know what an app is, let alone care. Most people are just buying whatever new phone the salesman at the service provider store pushes on them, which more & more are Samsung smartphones with Android. If Samsung goes all out with Tizen, especially in the low & mid range markets, it will become the #2 system and push Android to #3 overnight, even if there isn't one single third party app available. This has got to be Google's worst nightmare right now.
post #132 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I'm trying to see an upside for it, I'm guessing it will be the only phone that will tell me that my Scamsung fridge door is ajar .... But I will pass thanks.

Here's an upside: No longer will a zillion Android phone manufacturers be able to combine their sales with Samsung and claim dominance of the phone market over Apple's iOS. Samsung's Tizen and Android can duke it out over second and third place. Another side benefit is that Google will be drawn into combatting Samsung's Tizen with their own MotoMo Android OS, distracting Google's management further from their core search business. This will weaken Google's bottom linemakiing Apple stronger by comparison. 

 

Samsung, like Sony, has no idea what their customers want. Their idea of marketing is to make a lot of models and see what slides off the wall with a wet plop. 

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post #133 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

judging from what Motorola is doing, it wouldn't surprise me if one day Google just spit out a version of Android and Samsung did Tizen that was the extent of Android. HTC isn't making any money, NEC dumped their Android products, and I don't if anyone else is making any decent profits. Me too products generally don't last long.

Would you go into a line of business to only break even or make 1 to 5% net profit and never be able to be the market leader in control over the technology?

To answer your closing question: I think Google would be ecstatic to break even with Motorola. It's costing them several hundred million per quarter currently.

 

Keep also in mind that Google's Attention-Deficit management is already bored of Android and wanting to move onto playing with Chrome. There is really no long-term thinking at Samsung or Google/MotoMo.

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post #134 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikeb85 View Post

 

Alien Dalvik and other ports of the Dalvik VM enables most Android apps to run on Meego, Maemo, BlackBerry OS 10, iOS (yes, you can run Android apps on Apple devices if you're jailbroken and install Alien Dalvik), etc...  So running Android apps on Tizen shouldn't be a problem...

Throwing another layer of lag into the mix probably won't even be noticed by Samsung phone users. 

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post #135 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazy_mac_lover View Post

Samsung... U think u can build up your own Eco system ?
More like an "echo" system.
 
As in it's all been done before. lol.gif
post #136 of 171

I presume it will be designed with the same technical acumen and usability as the POS OS that comes with their Smart TV.

post #137 of 171

To be honest, I don't mind the homescreen. Everything else looks pretty crap. Does this mean Samsung will sell phones with 4 5 different operating systems? Tizen, Android, Windows Phone, Bada and that other one they use on the really low end phones... if so it sounds like a great way to make an awesome ecosystem /s

 

 

 

Edit: Added Windows phone.


Edited by CrashMyTstDummy - 8/6/13 at 6:55pm
post #138 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


I've understood Nexus devices to be used to introduce new OS versions and hardware standards and not intended as high volume commercial successes. But perhaps MS was doing the same with the Surface.

First off, Google and Microsoft, just like Samsung, and others make these products first and foremost for their own employees.  Years before the Surface, Microsoft employees were buying iPads and using them at work.  What do you think Microsoft is going to do? prevent Apple products from being used amongst Microsoft employees, especially when there are sales reps doing presentations.  The last thing they want is the company using a competitors product that doesn't run Office, because Microsoft's too stupid to port it over.

 

Now, Google has their own internal developers that need to test code, etc.  Google has these Nexus product for their employees and they probably make enough to sell to break even since they are just private label jobs and there really isn't anything THAT special about them other than they are cheap with maybe a decent spec here and there.

 

Now with Microsoft, they are spending TONS of money in advertising for the Surface, unlike Google for the Nexus.  I think Microsoft is spending somewhere around $500 Mil on tv ads, etc.  That's not chump change in the advertising world.  Nexus wasn't promoted nearly as much.


What is dumb is that the media shouldn't hype the Nexus product that much since it's not a product Google expects to make much money on.  And it's NOT a high end product, it's medium grade product.

 

Microsoft screwed up in a lot of ways and if Windows 8 doesn't take off within 2 years to the point where they have successfully taken 50% marketshare within their own platform, they will be in deep trouble.  And what is WIndows 9 going to look like and when is that scheduled to be released?  Is Microsoft going to constantly changing the UI because each time they do something, it doesn't work?  Vista is basically telling everyone, XP sucked, then Windows 7 tells everyone that WIndows Vista sucked, etc. etc. because Microsoft changes the product drastically rather than improving on what really works.  OS X looks from first sight the same as it always has, for the most part, but digging inside you know it's different.  Sure, I think Apple's due for a theme change, but not drastically changing the GUI so that the work flow is completely different like Windows 8.

post #139 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

What is dumb is that the media shouldn't hype the Nexus product that much since it's not a product Google expects to make much money on.  And it's NOT a high end product, it's medium grade product.

I would argue that.

 

The Nexus 4 was the sister phone to the LG's Optimus G flagship. At the time of launch, the Snapdragon S4 Pro was the most powerful SoC inside of a phone. It came with just about every feature expected of a flagship device. The only drawback was the lack of LTE support on many  networks (although never advertised, the Nexus 4 could run on select LTE bands).

 

The Nexus 10 was the first Android tablet to introduce a resolution beyond 1920x1200. It housed Samsung's Exynos 5250 which was the first SoC to market with ARM's Cortex A15 (ARMv8), and LPDDR3 memory. It was also the first SoC (and still is) to use ARM's Mali T600 series, the Mali-T604.

 

The first Nexus 7 is the only mid~high range product. Tegra 3 (2012 model) and Snapdragon S4 Pro (2013 model) had both been on the market for quite sometime before the launch of the Nexus 7. To the Nexus 7's defence, it was the first full feature 7inch tablet, and is now the first high resolution 7inch tablet. 

 

If rumours of the Nexus 5 are true, the LG G2 (being announced tomorrow morning) will be the sister phone, and it uses a 1080p display combined with Qualcomm's Snapdragon 800 + LTE-Advanced. So once again it will be a top of the line device.


Edited by LAKings33 - 8/6/13 at 6:33pm
post #140 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I've understood Nexus devices to be used to introduce new OS versions and hardware standards and not intended as high volume commercial successes. But perhaps MS was doing the same with the Surface.

Nonsense. Google sells Nexus devices by the millions and makes absolutely no effort to limit their sale. They'd be happy to take all the sales they can get. "Not intended as a commercial success" is total BS. Google goes out of its way to sell as many Nexus devices as they can with full advertising and so on.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soloman View Post

People with older {iOs} devices can't find previous apps.

Yes, I suppose that owners of the original iPhone might not be able to run a tiny percentage of current apps.

But anyone denying that the problem is 100 times worse on Android for the reasons I already gave is lying.
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post #141 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAKings33 View Post

I would argue that.

 

The Nexus 4 was the sister phone to the LG's Optimus G flagship. At the time of launch, the Snapdragon S4 Pro was the most powerful SoC inside of a phone. It came with just about every feature expected of a flagship device. The only drawback was the lack of LTE support on many  networks (although never advertised, the Nexus 4 could run on select LTE bands).

 

The Nexus 10 was the first Android tablet to introduce a resolution beyond 1920x1200. It housed Samsung's Exynos 5250 which was the first SoC to market with ARM's Cortex A15 (ARMv8), and LPDDR3 memory. It was also the first SoC (and still is) to use ARM's Mali T600 series, the Mali-T604.

 

The first Nexus 7 is the only mid~high range product. Tegra 3 (2012 model) and Snapdragon S4 Pro (2013 model) had both been on the market for quite sometime before the launch of the Nexus 7. To the Nexus 7's defence, it was the first full feature 7inch tablet, and is now the first high resolution 7inch tablet. 

 

If rumours of the Nexus 5 are true, the LG G2 (being announced tomorrow morning) will be the sister phone, and it uses a 1080p display combined with Qualcomm's Snapdragon 800 + LTE-Advanced. So once again it will be a top of the line device.

The camera is horrible, especially in low light, and it doesn't support 4G/LTE, plus the battery life wasn't that great.

post #142 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Nonsense. Google sells Nexus devices by the millions and makes absolutely no effort to limit their sale. They'd be happy to take all the sales they can get. "Not intended as a commercial success" is total BS. Google goes out of its way to sell as many Nexus devices as they can with full advertising and so on.
Yes, I suppose that owners of the original iPhone might not be able to run a tiny percentage of current apps.

But anyone denying that the problem is 100 times worse on Android for the reasons I already gave is lying.

According to the market research I read, they only sold 1 million Nexus 4 phones up through Feb. 2013.  They had a long period where Google wasn't even ordering them as LG said the stock outs was due to production issues, it was because Google didn't order that many and Google didn't want to impede on Samsung business.

 

The Nexus 7 sold as of July 2013 and these numbers are from market research that are supposed to be reliable sources.  They didn't list Nexus 10 sales, probably due to poor sales.

post #143 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

The camera is horrible, especially in low light, and it doesn't support 4G/LTE, plus the battery life wasn't that great.

The camera was definitely average, although it was slightly improved through updates, it still never managed to excel in anything particular.

 

It supports HSPA+ 42 worldwide and select LTE bands.

 

The battery life was improved a fair bit when Android 4.2.2 was released, and even more with Android 4.3. 

 

It also has a number of other features to offer. NFC, wireless charging, Bluetooth 4.0, WiFi a/b/g/n 2.4GHz/5GHz, etc.

 

The S4 Pro SoC also allowed the Nexus 4 to be one of the first devices on the market to have hardware support for OpenGL ES 3.0.

 

Calling this device 'mid-range' is just wrong.

post #144 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAKings33 View Post

The camera was definitely average, although it was slightly improved through updates, it still never managed to excel in anything particular.

 

It supports HSPA+ 42 worldwide and select LTE bands.

 

The battery life was improved a fair bit when Android 4.2.2 was released, and even more with Android 4.3. 

 

It also has a number of other features to offer. NFC, wireless charging, Bluetooth 4.0, WiFi a/b/g/n 2.4GHz/5GHz, etc.

 

The S4 Pro SoC also allowed the Nexus 4 to be one of the first devices on the market to have hardware support for OpenGL ES 3.0.

 

Calling this device 'mid-range' is just wrong.

4.2.2?  NFC had a hack, so that was released too soon, no one really uses NFC.  I've asked most of my Android using friends and most of them don't even know what NFC is, if they had it in their smartphone and how to use it.

Wireless charging is dumb, it requires an expensive charging unit that's not that portable and wireless charging is really overrated.

 

I still call it mid-range.  It's priced as a mid-range phone.

post #145 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAKings33 View Post

The camera was definitely average, although it was slightly improved through updates, it still never managed to excel in anything particular.

 

It supports HSPA+ 42 worldwide and select LTE bands.

 

The battery life was improved a fair bit when Android 4.2.2 was released, and even more with Android 4.3. 

 

It also has a number of other features to offer. NFC, wireless charging, Bluetooth 4.0, WiFi a/b/g/n 2.4GHz/5GHz, etc.

 

The S4 Pro SoC also allowed the Nexus 4 to be one of the first devices on the market to have hardware support for OpenGL ES 3.0.

 

Calling this device 'mid-range' is just wrong.

 

 

 

A phone priced at $400 or less is considered a mid-range phone. I can't help it if they really didn't sell many.  If it was a REAL high end phone selling dirt cheap, then why did the S3 outsell the Nexus 4?  Huh? I would classify the S3 as a high end phone, but I wouldn't classify the Nexus 4 as one.  Sorry, but I have my opinion and you have yours.

post #146 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAKings33 View Post

I would argue that.

 

The Nexus 4 was the sister phone to the LG's Optimus G flagship. At the time of launch, the Snapdragon S4 Pro was the most powerful SoC inside of a phone. It came with just about every feature expected of a flagship device. The only drawback was the lack of LTE support on many  networks (although never advertised, the Nexus 4 could run on select LTE bands).

 

The Nexus 10 was the first Android tablet to introduce a resolution beyond 1920x1200. It housed Samsung's Exynos 5250 which was the first SoC to market with ARM's Cortex A15 (ARMv8), and LPDDR3 memory. It was also the first SoC (and still is) to use ARM's Mali T600 series, the Mali-T604.

 

The first Nexus 7 is the only mid~high range product. Tegra 3 (2012 model) and Snapdragon S4 Pro (2013 model) had both been on the market for quite sometime before the launch of the Nexus 7. To the Nexus 7's defence, it was the first full feature 7inch tablet, and is now the first high resolution 7inch tablet. 

 

If rumours of the Nexus 5 are true, the LG G2 (being announced tomorrow morning) will be the sister phone, and it uses a 1080p display combined with Qualcomm's Snapdragon 800 + LTE-Advanced. So once again it will be a top of the line device.

Why are you so upset? did you buy one?

post #147 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

4.2.2?  NFC had a hack, so that was released too soon, no one really uses NFC.  I've asked most of my Android using friends and most of them don't even know what NFC is, if they had it in their smartphone and how to use it.

Wireless charging is dumb, it requires an expensive charging unit that's not that portable and wireless charging is really overrated.

 

I still call it mid-range.  It's priced as a mid-range phone.

The Nexus 4 launched with 4.2.1, it was then updated to 4.2.2. 4.3 is the latest version of Android.

 

There are plenty of services and devices that support NFC. An example of day-to-day NFC use are the chips inside credit card for Visa PayWave or Master Card PayPass.

 

Overrated or not, wireless charging is still an additional feature that some enjoy.

 

Just because it was priced as a mid range device doesn't mean it was a mid range device.

 

Next time I recommend you actually take to time to educate yourself on the device before passing judgement.

post #148 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

A phone priced at $400 or less is considered a mid-range phone. I can't help it if they really didn't sell many.  If it was a REAL high end phone selling dirt cheap, then why did the S3 outsell the Nexus 4?  Huh? I would classify the S3 as a high end phone, but I wouldn't classify the Nexus 4 as one.  Sorry, but I have my opinion and you have yours.

 

When has sales or price ever made a device high-end or low-end?

post #149 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

 

What is dumb is that the media shouldn't hype the Nexus product that much since it's not a product Google expects to make much money on.  And it's NOT a high end product, it's medium grade product.

 

 

Actually, I'm surprised that the press, especially the tech media, doesn't hype Nexus devices more as the only Android devices to get prompt OS updates. The tech sites ought to hammer "high end" device makers for updating their OS's so slowly if at all. Why hasn't Samsung updated the GS3 to 4.2? 
 
If Samsung has this much trouble updating their OS when most of the heavy lifting is already done by Google, how will they cope with having to maintain the core OS themselves?

Edited by d4NjvRzf - 8/6/13 at 10:15pm
post #150 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAKings33 View Post

The Nexus 4 launched with 4.2.1, it was then updated to 4.2.2. 4.3 is the latest version of Android.

 

There are plenty of services and devices that support NFC. An example of day-to-day NFC use are the chips inside credit card for Visa PayWave or Master Card PayPass.

 

Overrated or not, wireless charging is still an additional feature that some enjoy.

 

Just because it was priced as a mid range device doesn't mean it was a mid range device.

 

Next time I recommend you actually take to time to educate yourself on the device before passing judgement.

Why? I read several different comparisons of the product and it do too well for things I mentioned.  It was announced and it didn't do 4G/LTE, the iPhone 5 does 4G/lLTE, the S3 does 4G/LTE.

 

As far as I read, it wasn't a FREKING HIGH END PHONE, so get over yourself.

 

High end phones are PRICED AS A HIGH END PHONE.


How about looking at it like this?

 

Which one of these cars do you think is NOT a high end car.

 

Mercedes S 63  AMG

Kia Cadenza?

 

Each of these 4 door cars are the most expensive from each company.  So they are their respective FLAGSHIP PRODUCTS.

 

From the way YOU sound, the Kia would be a high end car.  From my perspective the Kia would be a mid-range car.

 

The Mercedes is a car that's PRICED as a HIGH end car, and the KIa is PRICED as a MID PRICED car.

 

DO YOU UNDERSTAND?

 

If there was a review of these two cars, would the Kia rate as well as the Mercedes?

 

From the comparison reviews I read, it didn't rate the Nexus 4 as good of a phone as an iPhone 5 or S3. I wonder why.

post #151 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

Why? I read several different comparisons of the product and it do too well for things I mentioned.  It was announced and it didn't do 4G/LTE, the iPhone 5 does 4G/lLTE, the S3 does 4G/LTE.

 

As far as I read, it wasn't a FREKING HIGH END PHONE, so get over yourself.

 

High end phones are PRICED AS A HIGH END PHONE.


How about looking at it like this?

 

Which one of these cars do you think is NOT a high end car.

 

Mercedes S 63  AMG

Kia Cadenza?

 

Each of these 4 door cars are the most expensive from each company.  So they are their respective FLAGSHIP PRODUCTS.

 

From the way YOU sound, the Kia would be a high end car.  From my perspective the Kia would be a mid-range car.

 

The Mercedes is a car that's PRICED as a HIGH end car, and the KIa is PRICED as a MID PRICED car.

 

DO YOU UNDERSTAND?

 

If there was a review of these two cars, would the Kia rate as well as the Mercedes?

 

From the comparison reviews I read, it didn't rate the Nexus 4 as good of a phone as an iPhone 5 or S3. I wonder why.

Once again, the Nexus 4 unofficially supports LTE on select bands:

 

ltenexus4.jpg

Nexus-4-LTE-Screenshot.jpg

 

Your car analogy makes not sense. The Snapdragon S4 Pro inside of the Nexus 4 is more powerful than the A6 inside the iPhone 5 and the Snapdragon S4 inside the Galaxy S3.

 

I don't understand why this is so hard for you to grasp, higher price does not always mean a device is or isn't high end.

 

If it makes you feel better, the Nexus 4 was only $300/$350 in select countries from the Google Play store. There was also limited supply until January 2013. In other parts of the world the Nexus 4 sold for up to ~$650. The price to get the device from a provider (off contract) was also between $400~$600.

 

Love it or hate it, when this device was launched in 2012 it was high end.


Edited by LAKings33 - 8/6/13 at 10:28pm
post #152 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAKings33 View Post

Once again, the Nexus 4 unofficially supports LTE on select bands:

 

ltenexus4.jpg

Nexus-4-LTE-Screenshot.jpg

 

Your car analogy makes not sense. The Snapdragon S4 Pro inside of the Nexus 4 is more powerful than the A6 inside the iPhone 5 and the Snapdragon S4 inside the Galaxy S3.

 

I don't understand why this is so hard for you to grasp, higher price does not always mean a device is or isn't high end.

 

If it makes you feel better, the Nexus 4 was only $300/$350 in select countries from the Google Play store. There was also limited supply until January 2013. In other parts of the world the Nexus 4 sold for up to ~$650. The price to get the device from a provider was also between $400~$600.

 

Love it or hate it, when this device was launched in 2012 it was high end.

I still think it's a POS.  And you should just stick to going to Android related sites and enjoy high fiving each other on Android products.  I don't go on Android related sites like you do.  So, what's your problem?  Are you desperate for attention?  Did you not understand that I don't classify Android as a platform I will consider due to the apps I want to use don't exist on the Android platform?

 

Android isn't a secure platform.  Heck, they didn't even have a Find my Phone app until just recently. Too much malware.  Not enough apps that I plan on using.

 

There are apps on IOS and OS X that I use daily that sync up with one another so which ever device I'm on, when I update a data file, it automatically updates all of the others.  To me, that's a useful feature that I use DAILY.  I can't do that on Android.  

 

I also kind of have to use an iPad due to software and hardware that I'm planning on getting in the future that ONLY run on  iPads and they aren't going to make them for Android and I don't want to use a OS for a smartphone that's different from my tablet.  I've got enough stuff to learn about.  So have fun with your little Nexus 4 phone and go to a Nexus/Android site and talk amongst yourselves and stop bothering others that aren't interested in Nexus products.

 

Well, why did it not sell better than the S3 or iPhone 5 if it's so freaking good? Because Google didn't want to sell that many?  

post #153 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAKings33 View Post

Once again, the Nexus 4 unofficially supports LTE on select bands:

 

ltenexus4.jpg

Nexus-4-LTE-Screenshot.jpg

 

Your car analogy makes not sense. The Snapdragon S4 Pro inside of the Nexus 4 is more powerful than the A6 inside the iPhone 5 and the Snapdragon S4 inside the Galaxy S3.

 

I don't understand why this is so hard for you to grasp, higher price does not always mean a device is or isn't high end.

 

If it makes you feel better, the Nexus 4 was only $300/$350 in select countries from the Google Play store. There was also limited supply until January 2013. In other parts of the world the Nexus 4 sold for up to ~$650. The price to get the device from a provider (off contract) was also between $400~$600.

 

Love it or hate it, when this device was launched in 2012 it was high end.

I don't ever plan on buying a Nissan product.   So why would I waste my time learning about them?  To me, that's a waste of my time. Do I care about their products? NOPE. Do I like their products? NOT REALLY.  I've ridden in several Nissan cars that people I know have owned and for what it's worth, I wasn't that impressed with them.  But some of the owners of their cars LOVE them like they are the best things in the entire planet.  But to me, they're a POS. I wouldn't buy one, I wouldn't consider them and I could care LESS about them, to me they are cheap cars.  I don't have to own one either to know that.

post #154 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

I still think it's a POS.  And you should just stick to going to Android related sites and enjoy high fiving each other on Android products.  I don't go on Android related sites like you do.  So, what's your problem?  Are you desperate for attention?  Did you not understand that I don't classify Android as a platform I will consider due to the apps I want to use don't exist on the Android platform?

 

Android isn't a secure platform.  Heck, they didn't even have a Find my Phone app until just recently. Too much malware.  Not enough apps that I plan on using.

 

There are apps on IOS and OS X that I use daily that sync up with one another so which ever device I'm on, when I update a data file, it automatically updates all of the others.  To me, that's a useful feature that I use DAILY.  I can't do that on Android.  

 

I also kind of have to use an iPad due to software and hardware that I'm planning on getting in the future that ONLY run on  iPads and they aren't going to make them for Android and I don't want to use a OS for a smartphone that's different from my tablet.  I've got enough stuff to learn about.  So have fun with your little Nexus 4 phone and go to a Nexus/Android site and talk amongst yourselves and stop bothering others that aren't interested in Nexus products.

 

Well, why did it not sell better than the S3 or iPhone 5 if it's so freaking good? Because Google didn't want to sell that many?  

When did this become about Android?  I don't really care what you think about the OS or the device.

 

My reply to your original message was to explain how your claim about the Nexus 4 being a mid-range device is incorrect.

 

On a personal note, I tend to keep up with the majority of tech news.  The mobile industry and the technology that surrounds it just happens to be one of my many interests.

 

The initial sale of the Nexus 4 was extremely limited until January of 2013.  The distribution was only in select markets, and the device had no advertising aside from listings by cellular providers.  Really, it shouldn't be that hard to understand, I don't know why I'm even entertaining this.

post #155 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAKings33 View Post

Once again, the Nexus 4 unofficially supports LTE on select bands:

ltenexus4.jpg
Nexus-4-LTE-Screenshot.jpg

Your car analogy makes not sense. The Snapdragon S4 Pro inside of the Nexus 4 is more powerful than the A6 inside the iPhone 5 and the Snapdragon S4 inside the Galaxy S3.

I don't understand why this is so hard for you to grasp, higher price does not always mean a device is or isn't high end.

If it makes you feel better, the Nexus 4 was only $300/$350 in select countries from the Google Play store. There was also limited supply until January 2013. In other parts of the world the Nexus 4 sold for up to ~$650. The price to get the device from a provider (off contract) was also between $400~$600.

Love it or hate it, when this device was launched in 2012 it was high end.

The more powerful processor Alone means nothing. Oh yeah android as a platform needs more hardware power and needs to have a bigger size to fit a larger battery to get the performance an iPhone gets with lower processor specs and a compact body with a smaller battery.

It's the software system running on the device that allows it to achieve this along with the hardware capabilities. Which is precisely why an iPhone is a class apart from any android phone out there.

The notion of having a bigger screen is technically there lack of expertise to make the device as efficient as the iPhone on lower processors / battery.

And they coverup that fact by saying well the people want bigger sized phones. Gosh a phone that feels like a tablet in your pocket or hands, no thank you.
post #156 of 171
I thought the "simple alternative to Android" is iOS....
post #157 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikilok View Post


The more powerful processor Alone means nothing. Oh yeah android as a platform needs more hardware power and needs to have a bigger size to fit a larger battery to get the performance an iPhone gets with lower processor specs and a compact body with a smaller battery.

It's the software system running on the device that allows it to achieve this along with the hardware capabilities. Which is precisely why an iPhone is a class apart from any android phone out there.

The notion of having a bigger screen is technically there lack of expertise to make the device as efficient as the iPhone on lower processors / battery.

And they coverup that fact by saying well the people want bigger sized phones. Gosh a phone that feels like a tablet in your pocket or hands, no thank you.

 

A wider display could justify a wider battery only if the increased capacity outweighs the extra power consumption. But if battery life actually improves as the display gets larger, Tim Cook wouldn't have cited battery life as a tradeoff of a larger screen (http://appleinsider.com/articles/13/05/29/apples-cook-explains-one-a-year-iphone-strategy-hints-at-future-models-at-variable-price-points). Therefore it's more likely that the battery is larger because of the display, not the other way around. Can you supply evidence to the contrary?


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 8/6/13 at 11:22pm
post #158 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziadjk View Post

I thought the "simple alternative to Android" is iOS....
For the people yes. For samsung No.
post #159 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post

A wider display could justify a wider battery only if the increased capacity outweighs the extra power consumption. But if battery life actually improves as the display gets larger, Tim Cook wouldn't have cited battery life as a tradeoff of a larger screen (http://appleinsider.com/articles/13/05/29/apples-cook-explains-one-a-year-iphone-strategy-hints-at-future-models-at-variable-price-points). Therefore it's more likely that the battery is larger because of the display, not the other way around.
The wider screen size of most android phones are not to just power a wider screen, but the more resource intensive hardware compared to there iOS counterparts.
post #160 of 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAKings33 View Post

When did this become about Android?  I don't really care what you think about the OS or the device.

 

My reply to your original message was to explain how your claim about the Nexus 4 being a mid-range device is incorrect.

 

On a personal note, I tend to keep up with the majority of tech news.  The mobile industry and the technology that surrounds it just happens to be one of my many interests.

 

The initial sale of the Nexus 4 was extremely limited until January of 2013.  The distribution was only in select markets, and the device had no advertising aside from listings by cellular providers.  Really, it shouldn't be that hard to understand, I don't know why I'm even entertaining this.

It's priced in the mid-range price category probably because it only comes in 8 and 16G models and if they tried to sell it for more money that was equal to Apple, they'd probably sell less than they did.  I don't know if Google can private label a product at the same price point as Apple for a flagship product.   There are reasons why people will pay a premium for Apple and a lot has to do with everything surrounding the company and the eco-system.  From evaluating the various eco-systems, Google seems like the cheap me too sibling.  

 

They are PRICED as a mid range product.  They don't support 4G/LTE everywhere, the camera comparisons for low level light was awful when compared to a S3, iPhone 5 and last year's Nokia (whatever model it was), that's one comparison test I read.  Of the four, the Nokia was the best, the iPhone 5 was second best and almost as good as the Nokia and the S3 and Nexus 4 both sucked.  Do I use that?  actually, yeah, I have needed a camera that needed to do a decent low light photos for a legal document I was dealing with that I had to send a pdf version of and actually my iPhone 4 worked just fine.  I still don't have any problems with my iPhone 4 despite whatever problems people blew out of proportion.  I actually brought it to Apple just for shits and grins to see how the battery was doing and it's still holding a charge just fine. I've never had an app crash on their diagnostics s/w they run, nor have I have any dropped calls that I can remember, nor have I ever had to reinstall the OS. It has worked flawlessly with the exception of having a setting that I just had to switch off that I didn't realize would cause a certain symptom.  Other than that, it's been working just fine, but I am planning on replacing it since it's getting close to the 2 year contract coming up so I'm starting to see what i want to replace it with.  So, I've decided to wait until Apple releases a larger screen model since my eyesight sucks. Even though I've never seen a large screen phone I actually liked holding with the exception of the HTC One. That's the only one that I've ever held that I liked, but since it's Android, I won't buy it.  Malware is a SERIOUS issue with me. I've been stung with Malware on a Windows PC which is one of the many reasons why I won't buy a Windows computer, no matter how much someone else likes em, no matter how much market share they have.  Malware and security are two MAJOR concerns for me for VERY good reason.  Also ease of use, reliability, interoperability with OS X, tech support, application and hardware products available.  So, all of the things I look at, Apple is the only one that meets or exceeds my criteria. They may not have one feature here or there, but that usually changes as features always get added and Apple manages to figure out useable ways to add features that I request or find useful.

 

Personally, Google should get off their asses and improve YouTube.  That service is so awful, I wish I didn't want to use it, but they have a lot of videos I enjoy watching that people post.  But there is a lot of crap videos and horrible operation and YouTube couldn't get rid of Flash based videos soon enough.  It's a shame that a company that has the monopoly on a video site sucks as bad as it does. I don't think Google really cares how bad their site is because they are the only game in town so they don't have anyone really competing with them.   But they are pretty much the only game in town with the most content, but if someone else had the same content, I'd probably use something else.  I don't think Apple wants to get involved with a YouTube service due to copyright problems plaguing YouTube submissions.  But if they did, they would certainly have a better experience, but it would take them a long time to get the same amount of content.  To me, that's about the only thing I would miss if Google went belly up and cease to exist.  Internet search, there is Yahoo and Bing which do pretty much the same thing, so I could easily switch which I'm always comparing to see what is the most consist service.  My life wouldn't change that much without Google, but it would change for the worse if Apple cease to exist because the options out there suck and it would take a LONG time before anyone could get to where Apple is and is going.

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