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Purported 'iPhone 5S' camera module has separate LED flash component

post #1 of 5
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In an alleged internal design change, the camera for Apple's next-generation iPhone may have its LED flash component completely independent from the lens.

iPhone 5S


Pictures of the alleged "iPhone 5S" component were published on Wednesday by Nowhereelse.fr, showing a standalone camera attached to a ribbon. That would be a change from the current iPhone 5, where the LED flash has a ribbon attached to the same component.

It's rumored that Apple's next flagship iPhone will feature dual LED flash that will allow for better illumination of photos in low-light situations. Leaked schematics obtained by AppleInsider have shown that the two LED flash parts will be included in a "pill" shaped window on the back of the device, to the right of the lens.

The camera module pictured Wednesday was actually shown previously, but those initial reports claimed it was a part intended for Apple's low-cost iPhone. However, that may have been a mix-up, as the same part has now surfaced from a Chinese supplier being labeled as a part for Apple's so-called "iPhone 5S."

The part gives no indication as to the quality of the camera, though earlier rumors have suggested that the "iPhone 5S" will sport a 12-megapixel shooter capable of high dynamic range images and better nighttime photos. The current iPhone 5 has an 8-megapixel lens that was carried over from the iPhone 4S, though Apple added a sapphire glass lens assembly to protect against scratches.

Well-connected analyst Ming-Chi Kuo of KGI Securities said last month that he expects the "iPhone 5S" will be in short supply when it launches this fall. In particular, Apple's next-generation iPhone is rumored to feature a fingerprint sensor beneath the home button for securely identifying users.
post #2 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Well-connected analyst Ming-Chi Kuo of KGI Securities said last month that he expects the "iPhone 5S" will be in short supply when it launches this fall.

Why does the media continue to publicize these ridiculous claims? They've been claiming the same thing for every iPhone ever released - and it was true only for the iPhone 1.

In any other field, if you're consistently wrong, people stop listening to you. In "journalism" (quotes intentional), it's apparently OK to be consistently wrong.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #3 of 5
Finally! Though it's still way to close to avoid red-eye. For that, the flash needs to be even further away. Just look at red-eye symptom when using the build-in flash on a SLR, and why photographers use external ones.
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
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How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
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post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Why does the media continue to publicize these ridiculous claims? They've been claiming the same thing for every iPhone ever released - and it was true only for the iPhone 1.

In any other field, if you're consistently wrong, people stop listening to you. In "journalism" (quotes intentional), it's apparently OK to be consistently wrong.

 

Rhetorical question?

 

Predicting an Apple product will be in short supply for the first few weeks or months is not much of a prediction. You'd be 90% successful with the prediction by just saying the Apple XYZ product will be in short supply every single time.

post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Finally! Though it's still way to close to avoid red-eye. For that, the flash needs to be even further away. Just look at red-eye symptom when using the build-in flash on a SLR, and why photographers use external ones.

 

Red eye is caused when the light bounces back from the pupil. Since external flashes are at a different angle, due to its height, the angle of refection is also different, and therefore that light does not bounce back into the lens. 

 

A few ways to eliminate red eye. 1) don't have your flash point at the subject at the same angle as the lens, or 2) have a pre-flash that will close the pupil and therefore reduce the amount of light bouncing back, 3) have constant light on the subject instead of a flash. 

 

With that said, we use external flashes more for their power and the ability to change the direction of the light. 

 

Apple would be best to have a wider flash on the other side of the phone that would also give a quick burst prior to taking the image depending on the ambient light. I would love to see a wider, stronger, defused flash, but I'm sure that is in no way going to happen : ) 

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