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Canalys: Android lacks the 'rigorously managed, high-quality, optimized' apps seen on Apple's iPad

post #1 of 80
Thread Starter 
Market research group Canalys offered a scathing appraisal of the apps currently available for Android tablet users, stating that "building high-quality app experiences for Android tablets has not been among many developers? top priorities to date."

Nexus 7


The report contrasted the library of "over 375,000" iPad-optimized titles in Apple's App Store against "the low tens of thousands available through Google Play," but focused on just the top one hundred most popular iPad apps: 50 free and 50 paid.

Out of the top 100 popular iPad titles, Canalys reported 30 were missing entirely from Google Play. That includes Apple's chart topping Pages, Keynote, Numbers, iMovie, GarageBand and iPhoto, which are all paid titles exclusive to iPad, as well as Apple's free Podcasts, iBooks and iTunes U for iPad.

Optimized ever so slightly



The group counted another 18 apps as only existing as stretched smartphone apps on Android, designed to fill a tablet's display but not taking special advantage of it.

However, Canalys did include apps like Pandora in its optimized list, in contrast with a recent report by Jared Newman for Time, which cited Pandora's app along with popular titles including Twitter, Facebook, Dropbox as being "the worst offenders" at failing to take any advantage of the additional real estate on tablets, and just "stretching out their interfaces instead of filling the screen with sidebars and menus."


Android tablet apps


Tablet optimized? Android vs iPad versions of Pandora. Source: Time


Canalys listed all of those apps as being "optimized" for Android tablets, despite actually not being very much more than a smartphone app with a few tweaks. The company did note that its criteria for counting 52 "optimized" Android apps only specified apps that were "optimized (if only a little) for tablet use."

At the launch of iPad 4 and iPad mini last October, Apple's head of product marketing Phil Schiller drew special attention to the "night and day" difference between tablet-optimized iPad apps and the stretched smartphone apps that work on Android tablets (below).




Tablet optimized: Android vs iPad versions of TripAdvisor


Of its generously counted Android-optimized titles, Canalys said six paid apps for iPad are only available as free, ad-supported version on Android. And that wasn't described as a being a compliment.Android's "ad-supported offerings typically deliver a poorer and often more limited user experience, sometimes taking a considerable toll on device battery life and often subjecting users to unskippable videos or other unpopular intrusions." - Canalys

"While nominally free," Canalys Analyst Daniel Matte wrote, "set against a paid version of the app, ad-supported offerings typically deliver a poorer and often more limited user experience, sometimes taking a considerable toll on device battery life and often subjecting users to unskippable videos or other unpopular intrusions."

Facebook for Android, for example, was recently called out by Symantec for "leaking" Android users' information.

"The first time you launch the Facebook application," the security firm stated, "even before logging in, your phone number will be sent over the Internet to Facebook servers. You do not need to provide your phone number, log in, initiate a specific action, or even need a Facebook account for this to happen."

Perhaps the market is driving backwards



It's no secret that Android tablets lack the variety and depth of software available for Apple's iPad. David Pierce, reviewing Google's Nexus for The Verge, wrote that, "the Android app situation has improved a lot, but it's still squarely in the iPad's rearview mirror. From Paper to Clear to Badland, it's no contest."

It's less clear why Android is still so far behind the iPad in apps. Samsung rushed out millions of Galaxy Tab shipments just eight months after the iPad in 2010, and the world was duly informed by Strategy Analytics that Apple's market share in tablets had immediately dropped by 20 percentage points.

Google followed up a few months later with Android 3.0 Honeycomb, unleashing an "avalanche" of Android tablets before the iPad was even a year old.

And yet, three and a half years later, even as Strategy Analytics reports that Android tablets now ship in volumes over twice as large (and due to its retroactive accounting revisions, that Android has been leading the tablet market since at least the spring of 2012), Android's tablet apps are still "still squarely in the iPad's rearview mirror."

Android tablets in the rear view mirror online, too



While not driving optimized tablet app development, the mysterious White Box/Dark Matter nature of Android tablets are also failing to show up online.

Their invisibility is particularly apparent in web statistics, where Android phones do show up roughly equal to iPhones. Android tablets, however, don't really show up at all, even though iPad's 34.28 percent share (in June) makes a larger impression than the iPhone's 22.48 percent.





Speaking at the Wall Street Journal All Things D conference this spring, Apple's chief executive Tim Cook noted, "Last Black Friday IBM did a special study on ecommerce in the U.S. and they looked at every mobile device and what was bought off of those. [?] the study said that there were twice as many ecommerce transactions on iPad than all Android devices combined. Not Android tablets, all Android tablets plus phones. It?s incredible.?"So if there are lots of other tablets selling, I don't know what they are being used for, because that's a pretty basic function: web browsing." - Tim Cook

Citing Chitika's figures, Cook also noted in the company's most recent conference call, "iPad web share data shows that through the quarter we accelerated further and are now? iPad accounts for 84% of the web traffic from tablet, which is absolutely incredible. So if there are lots of other tablets selling, I don't know what they are being used for, because that's a pretty basic function: web browsing."

Conversely, when Google's head of Android Sundar Pichai introduced the company's new Nexus 7 last month, he had to reference a sales study that is known to be flawed in order to claim that the company's tablet had even temporarily outsold the iPad mini in Japan.

A representative of IDC, certainly not conservative in its estimates of Android sales, stated, "we count the Nexus 7 as part of Asus' shipments, and looking at our Japan numbers for 4Q12 (which represents shipments into the channel) Apple shipped about 773K iPad units versus about 350K Nexus 7 units for Asus."

random access memories
Source: InfoWorld


The best explanation for the dearth of Android tablet apps and the excessive numbers of Android tablet shipments that don't show up anywhere other than market share reports may be the flaws Symantec discovered in Android's random number generator.
post #2 of 80

Android wont ever see any of my apps thats for sure!

post #3 of 80
For those interested here's the list of the apps used for the Canalys comparison. Not that it diminishes the overall results but 10% of the iOS apps they used to compare are Apple's own iOS apps which of course wouldn't be available on other platforms anyway.

http://www.canalys.com/download/tablet_apps.pdf
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post #4 of 80
The headline link is currently providing me with a 404 error.

I had to click comments to read the story.

Hopefully someone from Apple Insider will read this comment.
post #5 of 80
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Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

The headline link is currently providing me with a 404 error.

I had to click comments to read the story.
Correct, same here
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post #6 of 80
"Out of the top 100 popular iPad titles, Canalys reported 30 were missing entirely from Google Play. That includes Apple's chart topping Pages, Keynote, Numbers, iMovie, GarageBand and iPhoto, which are all paid titles exclusive to iPad, as well as Apple's free Podcasts, iBooks and iTunes U for iPad."

Android doesn't need apps. Android has "customization."

The story is a bit biased in that regard though. A fair comparison would be a comparison between the native Google Apps and native Apple Apps. In the instance where Google doesn't offer an app then the comparison should be against the top selling app on Google although I am not sure what is offered on Android that compares to GarageBand though.

I always appreciate the comments about the iPhone being an App Launcher. Of course the iPhone is an App Launcher, every general purpose computer is an "App Launcher." Does Google Android not have Apps?
Edited by MacBook Pro - 8/15/13 at 7:28am
post #7 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

"Out of the top 100 popular iPad titles, Canalys reported 30 were missing entirely from Google Play. That includes Apple's chart topping Pages, Keynote, Numbers, iMovie, GarageBand and iPhoto, which are all paid titles exclusive to iPad, as well as Apple's free Podcasts, iBooks and iTunes U for iPad."

Android doesn't need apps. Android has "customization."

The story is a bit biased in that regard though. A fair comparison would be a comparison between the native Google Apps and native Apple Apps. In the instance where Google doesn't offer an app then the comparison should be against the top selling app on Google although I am not sure what is offered on Android that compares to GarageBand though.

I always appreciate the comments about the iPhone being an App Launcher. Of course the iPhone is an App Launcher, every general purpose computer is an "App Launcher." Does Google Android not have Apps?

 

I agree with your suggestion for how to make the comparison.  That seems like a more logical way to go about it.

 

The "app launcher" description for the iPhone is because the main UI, the homescreen, serves no purpose but to display the grid of apps.  Android and Windows Phone homescreens can provide information without entering apps.  I would really like to see Apple implement a version of the live tiles from Windows if they aren't going to add support for widgets.

post #8 of 80

The thing I find interesting is that Android tablets don't even really compete on price either.  Of course they are cheaper, but the only "good" ones that are actually usable are the top end ones like the Nexus.  While the general perception is that the Nexus and other Android tablets are around $200 and that the nearest iPad is around $500 (I actually overheard a Nexus user explaining this to his friends in a coffee shop last night), where I live a Nexus is more like $250 and the cheapest iPad mini (it's main competitor) is only $329.  So while the perception is a gap of many hundreds of bucks it's really almost nothing at all. 

post #9 of 80
Including Apple apps is a very fair measure of what users are getting: they are great apps, they are popular, and they are not on Android. Excluding Apple's apps from the iOS advantage would be bizarre. Ditto for excluding Google apps.

When looking at this as a sign of developer interest (not the best way to measure that), excluding first-party apps would make sense. But even still, you'll then see some decent Google apps on iOS. (Google Maps on iOS has even had advantages, by Google's own admission, over their Android Maps.) And you won't see anything from Apple on Android.

Either way, iOS looks a lot better!

P.S. I never get an answer (maybe there is none?) but for Android fans: what are the great, tablet-optimized exclusive apps for Android?

Let's look at three categories:

1. System hacks and utilities. Android is king here! And some of those can be neat, no doubt. Android users love to bring those up, and they're not wrong.

2. Games. Love 'em! iOS has many more, but Android still has a respectable library, especially of mainstream fare. (I couldn't live without the awesome indie titles I play that never make it to Android.)

But what about...

3. Real power apps for productivity, with desktop-level features and great tablet design, such as these iOS exclusives:

ArtRage, GarageBand, Procreate, Inkpad, Pages, Numbers, iMovie, Keynote, Textastic, iDraw, iTunes U, OmniGraffle, iPhoto, Bento, Omni Outliner, ArtStudio, Adobe Ideas, NanoStudio, Diet Coda, Intaglio, Freeform, TouchUp, iTeleport, ReBirth

Where are Android-exclusive apps like these for Android? Not, “well, here’s SOME kind of app in this general category,” but a truly top-level (and tablet-optimized) experience with that level of productivity, features, and quality?

Even if you think I won't agree with your list, that's fair enough... but what IS your answer? Is there any significant number of great Android exclusives in this category?

It's also OK if you don't think "real apps" (as I've defined above) are an important category. There's a lot to be said for games, system mods, media consumption, social media, and good old web browsing. We can simply disagree on that, because I know so many iPad users who thought that's all they wanted, yet ended up doing much more. But for those who DO think "real apps" are important? What's for them on Android vs. the tsunami of iOS exclusives?
Edited by nagromme - 8/15/13 at 7:56am
post #10 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

"Out of the top 100 popular iPad titles, Canalys reported 30 were missing entirely from Google Play. That includes Apple's chart topping Pages, Keynote, Numbers, iMovie, GarageBand and iPhoto, which are all paid titles exclusive to iPad, as well as Apple's free Podcasts, iBooks and iTunes U for iPad."

Android doesn't need apps. Android has "customization."

The story is a bit biased in that regard though. A fair comparison would be a comparison between the native Google Apps and native Apple Apps. In the instance where Google doesn't offer an app then the comparison should be against the top selling app on Google although I am not sure what is offered on Android that compares to GarageBand though.

I always appreciate the comments about the iPhone being an App Launcher. Of course the iPhone is an App Launcher, every general purpose computer is an "App Launcher." Does Google Android not have Apps?

 

I disagree.  Your suggestion would be fair if the goal is a comparison between apps, and the relative quality of native vs. non-native apps. But Canalys is actually comparing platforms through the metric of app availability and quality.  It's a subtle difference but an important one.  

 

I get what you are saying that it's seemingly unfair to say that native Apple apps are not available on Android, since they were never intended to be and never will be, but to a buyer evaluating the platform choice, it's still valid to say that these apps (or apps like them) don't even exist on Android.  

 

Also, if a Garage Band equivalent or a Pages equivalent *did* exist on Android, it would no doubt be in the top 30 just as Apple's apps are and it wouldn't matter if it was a Google app or not either.  So the fact that no one has written apps like these for Android is still a valid point. 

post #11 of 80
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Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


Also, if a Garage Band equivalent or a Pages equivalent *did* exist on Android, it would no doubt be in the top 30 just as Apple's apps are and it wouldn't matter if it was a Google app or not either.  So the fact that no one has written apps like these for Android is still a valid point. 

The top 100 Android apps weren't shown were they? Not saying here is or isn't an "Android-equivalent" app for either of those. There may be, but as I'm no musician I couldn't personally comment on a music production app anyway. As for Pages I suspect there are very comparable apps available on the Android platform.

EDIT: This one gets favorably compared to Garage Band. That was in a quick search so I don't know if there's a better match.
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=net.uloops.android&hl=en
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post #12 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

 

I agree with your suggestion for how to make the comparison.  That seems like a more logical way to go about it.

 

The "app launcher" description for the iPhone is because the main UI, the homescreen, serves no purpose but to display the grid of apps.  Android and Windows Phone homescreens can provide information without entering apps.  I would really like to see Apple implement a version of the live tiles from Windows if they aren't going to add support for widgets.

 

Really surprised Apple hasn't offered its users widgets yet.  Once you get used to them they do all the work for you.  Apple could make them a little less chaotic then Android widgets and kind of define what users could and couldn't do with them (including the option not to use them).

 

The tablet argument is kind of a rewind of the phone argument two years ago.  These forums were littered with 'there's no phone Apps for android'   The phones sold, developers followed (with lag).  Now there are substantially more Android phone apps than iPhone Apps.  I think the 'store' numbers claim @800,000 android apps and 800,000 iPhone apps, but counts the 300,000+ tablet only apps in that number.  Android tablets have just started selling, developers will follow, but again with some lag.  In another two years there will likely be more (good) dedicated Android tablet apps than iPad apps.  Apple will still be alive and doing well and provide a more elegant experience than the Android ecosystem.

post #13 of 80
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Originally Posted by Frood View Post

 

Now there are substantially more Android phone apps than iPhone Apps

 

Never confuse sheer numbers with quality :) Android users know what I mean :p Throw out the junk of the App Store and the junk on Android, then compare again. Next, compare side-by-side those apps available for both iOS and Android. Not a pretty picture. Fragmentation is real, and its affects on app development are unavoidably massive.

 

And then on tablets we have the issue that commission-driven carrier salespeople aren't tossing bottom-end awful Android devices at uninformed shoppers. Android loses that major first-time-buyer advantage when it comes to tablets. (Not their only advantage of course: dirt-cheap devices sell on price alone around the world, and Apple won't make anything that poor; but those aren't big app-buying customers either.) People expecting Android to "catch up" and offer people as much as iOS seem to be forever reaching just over the horizon that never comes...


Edited by nagromme - 8/15/13 at 8:17am
post #14 of 80
There's a change in the winds on Apple reporting and in Apple stock of late and I firmly believe much of this has to do with the strong efforts of Mr Dilger. His analyses are being quoted on many sites, even the negative sites are taking note, and his work is bringing some great responses here on AI to which even the naysayers are finding difficulty in finding fault.

New things are on the horizon and with the DED leading the charge, let the games begin.

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post #15 of 80
Android apps will all self adapt for phone, tablet and Android laptops. So why don't Ipad apps do the same?
post #16 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by aBeliefSystem View Post

Android apps will all self adapt for phone, tablet and Android laptops. So why don't Ipad apps do the same?

 

They do--it's called Universal apps. And iOS 7 has even more tools for developers to use in auto-adapting.

 

Apple doesn't REQUIRE all apps be Universal, which is a sensible bone to throw developers, especially when a given app's function is really best suited to either pocket or tablet format alone. But they do clearly promote those apps that are, and the result is a success: better tablet apps than what you have on Android.

 

It's true that if you're stuck running a phone-only app on an iPad, it doesn't adapt nicely--but you're not likely to need to phone-only apps much on iPad.

 

As for they "all self adapt" on Android that's the common trap of pretending a list of features is the same as delivered reality. Bullet-point marketing. "Non-Apple product does X." With no regard for whether it does it well.

 

The question to ask is, why do so many apps on Android tablets just act like stretched smartphone apps, far inferior (as seen in the images above) to real tablet-optimized quality apps? Well, Google has a fragmentation problem with screen format (far smaller than the fragmentation problem with OS versions and hardware vendor overlay, but a problem). How to partly solve that for developers? Auto-stretching is certainly sensible. It works--but it works poorly.

 

iPad users shouldn't be bragging about iPhone-specific 2x apps. And Android users shouldn't be bragging about auto-adapted phone-style apps either!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mhikl View Post

There's a change in the winds on Apple reporting and in Apple stock of late and I firmly believe much of this has to do with the strong efforts of Mr Dilger. His analyses are being quoted on many sites, even the negative sites are taking note, and his work is bringing some great responses here on AI to which even the naysayers are finding difficulty in finding fault.

New things are on the horizon and with the DED leading the charge, let the games begin.
 
I can defend Apple better than I can defend DED... he does some awesome research and legwork, lays the details out neatly and thoroughly, and makes excellent points. I think him for that contribution. But far too often, he also hurts his own case (and makes us all look bad) by stretching too far, assuming too much, or going for the laugh when the facts are more nuanced. He's not always a fanboy, but the needle swings too far that way, too often, and his credibility would be so much better without those lapses.
 

A "best of DED" compilation is devastating to the mindless parroting of anti-Apple nonsense. A "worst of" is, sadly, nonsense of its own! (This article isn't really at either extreme.)

 

That said, much of the obviously false anti-Apple nonsense that gets repeated around the web and even mainstream media is on a whole other level! DED can be proud not to stoop to that level... I just wish he wouldn't stoop at all.


Edited by nagromme - 8/15/13 at 8:30am
post #17 of 80
Who cares? Fandroids just want cheap tablets. Give them a cheap enough product and poor apps don't even matter. Besides, the whole tablet thing is now about which platform has the most market share and Android is winning. When it comes to all mobile products only having major market share is the most important thing that everyone seems concerned about. Whoever sells the most units is considered the best, the most dominant and the one to remain forever in power.
post #18 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

I always appreciate the comments about the iPhone being an App Launcher. Of course the iPhone is an App Launcher, every general purpose computer is an "App Launcher." Does Google Android not have Apps?

I think the comments about the iPhone being an "App Launcher" refer to the fact that android allows third-party software to integrate more seamlessly with the overall system.

 

iOS treats each app as its own (mostly) isolated experience. Because facilities for inter-app communication are rather limited, the iOS user sometimes has to jump through hoops to perform tasks that use services from more than one app -- for example, when attaching a document to a reply email.

 

Apps on android are comprised of functional units called "activities" which can provide services to each other, even when they come from different apps. For example, when the user wants to attach a document to an email, the gmail app can launch the google drive file picker, which will then return the chosen file to gmail. The user can then continue composing the message. As a result, android feels more like a unified system with various capabilities rather than a springboard for various third-party apps.


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 8/15/13 at 12:53pm
post #19 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Constable Odo View Post

Who cares? Fandroids just want cheap tablets. Give them a cheap enough product and poor apps don't even matter. Besides, the whole tablet thing is now about which platform has the most market share and Android is winning. When it comes to all mobile products only having major market share is the most important thing that everyone seems concerned about. Whoever sells the most units is considered the best, the most dominant and the one to remain forever in power.

 

Too true!

 

But of course there are exception to the rule: when Apple, for instance, is selling the most units, then they're still doomed 1tongue.gif In that case, what matters is being "open source," or coming with a stylus, or some other thing 1wink.gif The goal posts move unpredictably--yet always away from Apple.

 

Also, be sure to mention "shipped" in your analysis, not "sold." Actually, no, you're right--use numbers for "shipped," but call them "sold."

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post

I think the comments about the iPhone being an "App Launcher" refer to the fact that android allows third-party software to integrate more seamlessly with the overall system.

 

iOS treats each app as its own (mostly) isolated experience. Because facilities for inter-app communication are rather limited, the iOS user sometimes has to jump through hoops to perform tasks that use services from more than one app -- for example, when attaching a document to a reply email.

 

Apps on android are organized into functional units called "activities" which can provide services to each other, even when they come from different apps. For example, when the user wants to attach a document to an email, the gmail app can launch the google drive file picker, which will then return the chosen file to gmail. The user can then continue composing the message. As a result, android feels more like a unified system with various capabilities rather than a springboard for various third-party apps.

 

This is true. A legitimate Android advantage for certain users. (And, of course, a disadvantage too. The happy medium hasn't yet been reached. Android's desktop-like complexity has its good points for some people, and Apple's sandboxing plus the growing Share pane has some too, but the ideal would lie somewhere in between, I feel.)

post #20 of 80
Originally Posted by aBeliefSystem View Post
Android apps will all self adapt for phone, tablet and Android laptops. So why don't Ipad apps do the same?

 

Easy to do when all the apps are just made for the phone and plopped down everywhere else.

 

Note: iOS apps have done this since the very VERY beginning.

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post #21 of 80

Does any one know why a big software company like Yahoo can not deliver its very good weather app optimized for iPad?  It is only an iPhone 5 optimized app on iPad. 

post #22 of 80
In other news a research group discovered that water is wet. Here's an idea, how about finding something we don't already know.
post #23 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Easy to do when all the apps are just made for the phone and plopped down everywhere else.

Note: iOS apps have done this since the very VERY beginning.

Correct me if I'm wrong but didn't they have to be updated first to include the iPad's resolution?
post #24 of 80

More red meat for the faithful. Another pointless smug article about the competition. Get Dilger to write some actual Apple content.

post #25 of 80
At least Android has Google Drive accessible to all apps that want it. The only way to share documents between apps via a common storage location on iOS is to use Google Drive or Drop Box third party SDKs. Apple has no way to do this. It is a huge miss and one I expect will hurt the platform over the next year.
post #26 of 80
Originally Posted by Soloman View Post
Correct me if I'm wrong but didn't they have to be updated first to include the iPad's resolution?

 

Right, but the ability to do the updating has been available since the first iOS (iPhone OS, really) version that supported multiple screen sizes. He's claiming otherwise.

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post #27 of 80
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Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


The top 100 Android apps weren't shown were they? Not saying here is or isn't an "Android-equivalent" app for either of those. There may be, but as I'm no musician I couldn't personally comment on a music production app anyway. As for Pages I suspect there are very comparable apps available on the Android platform.

EDIT: This one gets favorably compared to Garage Band. That was in a quick search so I don't know if there's a better match.
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=net.uloops.android&hl=en

 

Did you read the comments for that App? Most of the people who gave it good reviews clearly have no knowledge about mixing music and give generic sounding reviews.The few critical reviews are obviously written by someone who understands music production as they give specific reasons as to why they don't like it. You know, as if they actually used the App and were aware of its faults.

 

But the best one....

 

- "Better then Garage band I have been using this app for a year now and I recently bought an iphone. Ive used Garageband but I genuinely believe Pocketband is fifty times better all around. Get full version!"

 

Biggest lie ever. This App is complete garbage when compared to Garageband. As many reviewers commented you can't even actually make a song because of the gaps between your loops. You might not understand music but surely you should see how much of a glaring issue this is. Imagine editing video and there was a very short black screen between each of the scenes.

 

Android will NEVER have any good audio Apps until they get rid of audio latency, add support for more than 2 channels of audio and add MIDI support. These require a change to the OS at the most basic level and is something you can't just "add on" like an App.

 

 

Since many people don't understand audio latency and why it's so important I'll try to explain it to you as simply as I can using a drawing program as an example.

 

 

 

The blue line is low latency. The update speed of the cursor is very fast and every time you move the cursor the next data point is captured and drawn immediately, in real time. The red line shows latency. When you move the cursor there's a slight delay when the program gets the next data point, and it misses all the ones in between. So it lays down a point and simply CONNECTS a line between the previously known cursor position and the current cursor position. The only way to make the red line as smooth as the blue one is to move the cursor very slowly which allows the program to collect all the data points in between.

 

How to relate this to audio? Let's say you're adjusting the midrange EQ level for a track with a standard rotary knob. With low latency as soon as you make an adjustment (turn the knob) you can hear the result in real-time. This makes it very quick and easy to fine-tune the audio. With high latency there's a very short pause before you hear the result. If you turn the knob too quickly by the time you hear the result you might have already gone too far. The solution is the same as the drawing program - turn the knob very slowly to allow the program to update the audio stream with your new "position".

 

Now I'm sure someone is going to chime in and say "well, when you're fine-tuning your sound you're going to be turning the knob slowly anyway, so what's the problem?" This shows someone who's never worked a console before. What most people will do when listening to an effect is to make rapid changes to a control knob (turn it all the way left then right) to listen to the full range of effect and how severe it is. Then they will start to narrow it down and do the fine tuning. By having low latency you can make your rapid changes to get a "feel" for the control very quickly before moving on to finer adjustments.

 

This is just one single example. Latency is the bane of any audio system and when digital mixing consoles first came out that was one of the biggest problems that engineers had to overcome to make consoles "feel" the same as analog consoles (where controls responded to your touch immediately or when monitor feeds sent to performers were in real time without any delay).

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post #28 of 80
Thanks for the detailed (and polite!) reply. There may be a latency issue with Android audio (or whatever the problem is). You're much more informed on audio issues than I am. I really appreciate your attempt to explain it tho and no doubt there will be others here that will benefit from it too.
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post #29 of 80
It's always been known, from the very beginning, when Apple introduced the user-centric App Store model, built for and around their own devices, that Apple apps in quality far outclassed the competition's offerings. This hasn't changed. Because Android is an advertising delivery vector, rather than an ecosystem built with the user in mind.
post #30 of 80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post


I can defend Apple better than I can defend DED... he does some awesome research and legwork, lays the details out neatly and thoroughly, and makes excellent points. I think him for that contribution. But far too often, he also hurts his own case (and makes us all look bad) by stretching too far, assuming too much, or going for the laugh when the facts are more nuanced. He's not always a fanboy, but the needle swings too far that way, too often, and his credibility would be so much better without those lapses.

A "best of DED" compilation is devastating to the mindless parroting of anti-Apple nonsense. A "worst of" is, sadly, nonsense of its own! (This article isn't really at either extreme.)

That said, much of the obviously false anti-Apple nonsense that gets repeated around the web and even mainstream media is on a whole other level! DED can be proud not to stoop to that level... I just wish he wouldn't stoop at all.

Nagromme, I understand and truly sympathize with your sense of fairness. I suffer 1smile.gif that gene, as well. However, I've become disillusioned with the lack of objectivity in reporting on Apple, possibly done by the unscrupulous to gain more site visits. There must be money in this and money, for some, trumps integrity.

So I have stepped over my old line of 'argument for the sake of truth, justice and objectivity'. I have also come to the point that I will not act as devil's advocate, but stick to my principles of justice and truth as this situation warrants, in my understanding.

I see Samsung and Google as devious players. I know that even the devious can love small children and cuddly animals; Hitler was said to be found with a tear in his eye in their presence. But the underlying facts seem to me that these companies will (personification apt, I believe) stoop to devious means. I find it stunning that Samsung, for example, continues to use that ignorant phrase of rounded corners etc. And ignorant, not misunderstanding is the fact.

Yes, Mr Dilger steps up and puts a toe over the line. So do I and others, often for literary affect- hyperbolae, humour, damned frustration are a few possibilities. But for those who read the DED regularly, should understand this. He is, to my understanding a man with good sense and some temper; emotional in the fight when 'charge to action' means the difference between getting the point understood, while leaving the wiggle arguments to those who think fair is going to win the war. All great leaders, at some point in action, step over the line to save the day.

I'm just thankful that we have a few good men like this man on our side. I've seen sites, good Apple sites, lose honest Apple viewers, to the destruction of good argument, when taken over by Haters whose sole objective is the undermining of any arguments that support Apple's position. The MacObserver, for example, had a particularly nasty troll who was clever, informed and devious enough that he had the editors acquiescing on minor points as he nitpicked the site to harm such that the editors supported him when he was 'attacked', even questioned by less abled site members. In my opinion, when heart is lost, a grave injustice is done. That is when I had my turnaround. That is why I support the DED to the good, the honourable fight. He may approach the line and let a toe venture to the other side, but so what!. He is right and those who spiel lies and deception for their tired tirades trust the fire be returned.

Nag, I always enjoy your and many other members posts on AI that are more fair than mine. As a struggling man who cares for all sentient beings, I sense Daniel has the same heart and struggles with the verbosity and hyperbole you and others rightly question. But in war, a great leader does what s/he has to do. And well it is expected that the honest player also holds the leader to the standards expected from those that lead.
Edited by mhikl - 8/15/13 at 10:01am

When I find time to rewrite the laws of Physics, there'll Finally be some changes made round here!

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When I find time to rewrite the laws of Physics, there'll Finally be some changes made round here!

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post #31 of 80

I think a fair and easy comparison is how many top 100 apps are optimized for 'both' smartphone and tablet on each platform.  Dow any one know the numbers?


Edited by tzeshan - 8/15/13 at 10:01am
post #32 of 80
The real question for Apple over the long term is will this lead in app quality continue or just drop off once Android products become ubiquitous? I am not sure, but I suspect that the same drive for the lowest possible price is forcing Android tablets in particular to be much weaker substitutes for general purpose computing. I am currently getting a new computer system for my restaurant POS that is based upon the iPad. Breadcrum POS is owned by Groupon and it comes PCI Compliant out of the box. I would definitely be much more hesitant to use an android solution here. There are business quality apps on android, but the question is do these work well enough? My Lowes supplied installer who put in our screen door said yes that it works, but he sure didn't sound enthusiastic about how it works. Apple's real supporting structure under everything is a real world class OS under the hood that runs everything. This is why the Apps are more secure, easier to write and much easier to keep free of creeping rot.

The reason I am switching from my current POS is it is full of creehping rot from it's original incarnation as a Windows 95 application. Apple has turned the greatest strength of Wintel and even open source against themselves. Creeping rot does not go away if backwards compatibility of software and hardware is supported. Apple has used a strong Unix base and a willingness to drop support for hardware over 6 years old to kill the rot. This greatly reduces the total cost of ownership which shows up in Brand strength over the long haul. I think this is the answer that makes the most sense, not that Apple is some kind of Cult or religion. YVMV
post #33 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frood View Post

 

Really surprised Apple hasn't offered its users widgets yet.  Once you get used to them they do all the work for you.  Apple could make them a little less chaotic then Android widgets and kind of define what users could and couldn't do with them (including the option not to use them).

 

The tablet argument is kind of a rewind of the phone argument two years ago.  These forums were littered with 'there's no phone Apps for android'   The phones sold, developers followed (with lag).  Now there are substantially more Android phone apps than iPhone Apps.  I think the 'store' numbers claim @800,000 android apps and 800,000 iPhone apps, but counts the 300,000+ tablet only apps in that number.  Android tablets have just started selling, developers will follow, but again with some lag.  In another two years there will likely be more (good) dedicated Android tablet apps than iPad apps.  Apple will still be alive and doing well and provide a more elegant experience than the Android ecosystem.

 

I have yet to find someone give me an example of any Widget that would be useful. People always say "they're the greatest thing ever". So please give me a few examples of something a widget can do to increase my productivity or provide me with information.

 

Developers will follow? Eric Schmidt predicted that by June 2012 developers would favor Android over iOS because of market share. He's now over a year late and it still hasn't happened. Developers don't care about low-end junk phones nor do they care about $49 tablets in your grocery store or on the Shopping Channel. Remove those from Android and suddenly it's iOS that's the dominant platform. Add in the fragmentation problem for Android and the rapid adoption of iOS users to the latest version and is it any wonder why devs still prefer iOS?

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post #34 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhikl View Post

There's a change in the winds on Apple reporting and in Apple stock of late and I firmly believe much of this has to do with the strong efforts of Mr Dilger. His analyses are being quoted on many sites, even the negative sites are taking note, and his work is bringing some great responses here on AI to which even the naysayers are finding difficulty in finding fault.

New things are on the horizon and with the DED leading the charge, let the games begin.

 

HAHAHAHAHAHAHA... oh you're serious?  Half the readers on this site see through the DED fog and nobody outside of this website takes him seriously at all.  He editorializes and sensationalizes.  Anyone looking for genuinely useful analysis looks elsewhere, often to the analysts who take so much heat around here.

post #35 of 80
I agree that the quality of android apps is poor. I use the iWork apps regularly for creating and editing documents. I bought a Samsung tab2 7.0 because I wanted to try android. The Tab2 came with Polaris Office and I bought Quick Office Pro HD (google owned) and Kingsoft Office (free). None of these compare favourably to the iWork apps. Whilst they all open documents ok they are lacking when it comes to creating documents. Polaris doesn't have a spell checker, Quick Office can't create charts in spreadsheets an none have transitions in presentations. Plus the lack of screen real estate makes them virtually unusable with a soft keyboard. All in all office apps on android are a huge disappointment. I can actually create documents more easily using iWork in my iPhone 3GS.
post #36 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

 

I have yet to find someone give me an example of any Widget that would be useful. People always say "they're the greatest thing ever". So please give me a few examples of something a widget can do to increase my productivity or provide me with information.

 

 

How about the calendar widget on my homescreen?  It shows me an agenda as a scrollable list for the next week.  This can be found within the calendar app itself, of course, but I like to keep my calendar in single-day view, which means that, after one tap to enter the app, I have to tap on the view drop-down menu and tap on agenda view.  Then when I'm done I have to tap on the view drop-down and go back to single-day mode.  Plus I when I tap on an event in the widget, it launches the summary for that event instead of just launching the calendar or even the agenda view.

 

Or how about the widget that lets me turn on and off various radios and adjust brightness?  That was an incredible time saver before quick controls were built into Android.  Before the quick controls, I would have had to go into settings, tap into whatever setting category I needed, and then change the setting.

 

Then there is the current weather and a three-day forecast widget courtesy of WeatherBug.  It saves me a tap or two to launch the app and check the weather.

 

And then there's the widget on my lockscreen that activates the flashlight.  Illumination is a swipe and a tap away, and I don't even have to unlock my phone.  Plus if I have the light on for longer than the standard screen time-out, the phone turns off the screen as soon as I turn off the flashlight.  It's really convenient.  This one will be duplicated by the control panel on iOS.

 

I almost forgot the static search bar on stock Android.  I'm only one tap away from searching my device and the web.  Apple is also duplicating this one with the swipe down functionality coming with the redesign.

 

None of these widgets are life-changing, but their presence makes information and actions that much more accessible.


Edited by wakefinance - 8/15/13 at 11:17am
post #37 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


And yet, three and a half years later, even as Strategy Analytics reports that Android tablets now ship in volumes over twice as large (and due to its retroactive accounting revisions, that Android has been leading the tablet market since at least the spring of 2012), Android's tablet apps are still "still squarely in the iPad's rearview mirror."

Yup. You cannot see in a rearview mirror what is sitting at the back of a sock drawer.

When I find time to rewrite the laws of Physics, there'll Finally be some changes made round here!

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post #38 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

The top 100 Android apps weren't shown were they? Not saying here is or isn't an "Android-equivalent" app for either of those. There may be, but as I'm no musician I couldn't personally comment on a music production app anyway. As for Pages I suspect there are very comparable apps available on the Android platform.

EDIT: This one gets favorably compared to Garage Band. That was in a quick search so I don't know if there's a better match.
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=net.uloops.android&hl=en

ROTFLMAO. You've already been corrected once about audio apps.

http://www.androidtablets.net/forum/android-tablet-apps/31608-best-aps-creating-music.html
"There's no comparison here. Garageband is a full fledged recording tool and PocketBand is little more than a clip tracker. I'm frustrated that no one has gotten a Garageband-like app out yet on Android,"
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

"Android doesn't need apps. Android has "customization."

Good one. I always wonder why people think that 'customization' makes up for a system that's grossly inferior in almost every way.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

"The story is a bit biased in that regard though. A fair comparison would be a comparison between the native Google Apps and native Apple Apps. In the instance where Google doesn't offer an app then the comparison should be against the top selling app on Google although I am not sure what is offered on Android that compares to GarageBand though.

That doesn't make much sense. The comparison is about the entire ecosystem - and the analysis shows why iOS is better.
Quote:
Originally Posted by aBeliefSystem View Post

Android apps will all self adapt for phone, tablet and Android laptops. So why don't Ipad apps do the same?

They do. You might want to make an effort to learn something about iOS before you criticize it.
Edited by jragosta - 8/15/13 at 12:23pm
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post #39 of 80
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Canalys: Android lacks the 'rigorously managed, high-quality, optimized' apps seen on Apple's iPad

 

In other news: The Earth is Still Orbiting the Sun

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post #40 of 80

iOS has not done phone-on-tablet as well since the beginning and still doesn't. I'm a Mac person but Android has iOS by the short hairs here. On my Android tablet (I own one of each system) a "phone app" will open full screen, behave properly, change horizons when I turn my tablet and is crisper than any iOS App that has been "2x"d. Fonts all work and look beautiful... it's a much better experience. And often I don't know a "phone app" is even a phone app unless I've looked specifically for that info. Some developers do design better than others but overall... seriously, Android's implementation is much better on this aspect. 

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