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Wacom debuts pro-level pressure sensitive Intuos Creative Stylus for iPad

post #1 of 46
Thread Starter 
Wacom on Monday announced the Intuos Creative Stylus pressure-sensitive "digital pen" for iPad, which is designed to work in conjunction with supported apps to bring a more natural drawing experience to Apple's tablet lineup.

Intuos Stylus


The Intuos Stylus has advanced Wacom pressure sensing technology built in, making dynamic sketching and drawing on the iPad more accurate and seamless than similar products currently available.

Compatible with the third and fourth generation iPad, as well as the iPad mini, Wacom's stylus connects via Bluetooth 4.0 and allows for pressure-sensitive input with intelligent palm rejection in supported apps. Wacom notes the Creative Stylus supports the company's latest Bamboo Paper app as well as Autodesk SketchBook Pro, ArtRage, ProCreate and Psykopaint.

While the digital pen isn't positioned to replace the company's Cintiq 13HD connected tablet, it does offer a number of features over a normal capacitive stylus. Most notable is a level of pressure sensitivity normally reserved for professional products. The Intuos Stylus can detect 2,048 pressure levels, identical to Wacom's Intuos and Cintiq product lines, allowing artists to vary the size and shape of drawn lines on the fly. In addition, Wacom says the stylus adds a "realistic pen-on-paper" feel.

There are already pressure sensitive digital pens made for iPad, such as Ten One Design's Pogo Connect and the Adonit Jot Touch, but Wacom's forthcoming stylus appears to have the highest number of recognizable pressure levels, suggesting a higher level of accuracy.

Wacom's Intuos Creative Stylus will first be offered by Best Buy in October for $99.
post #2 of 46
Coooool!
post #3 of 46

Ooh. I may have to get one of these. Finally a proper stylus for a proper 'screen behind the touch surface' tablet.


Compatible with the third and fourth generation iPad

 

And… I'll just stick with my Intuos 4 medium, I guess.

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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #4 of 46
I like Wacom's stuff generally, but how can it be "accurate" when the end of it is the size of a baby's finger?
post #5 of 46

Will it work on PDFs/Pages/KN/Numbers -- e.g., being able to write on slides?

post #6 of 46
Well at least someone can innovate. Too bad Apple can't recognize that there are a lot of people who would use a stylus with an iPad, just like they originally failed to recognize that people would play games on iPhones and iPad. In the later Newton versions, digitizer support and handwriting recognition were actually pretty good. If Apple put half the effort they have into Siri they could add decent stylus and handwriting recognition in iOS and still maintain all the convenience using your fingers gives you when you are dealing with a small device like an iPhone. Apple used to be about empowering people with tools to create, not just consume. Lately it does not seem that way. I have a Wacom tablet and look forward to seeing if this new stylus will help make the iPad a decent creative tool.
post #7 of 46
The Cintiq 13HD is not a "standalone tablet". You connect it to machine, same as with the other Cintiqs.

I love my Cintiq 22HD Touch. That said, Wacom just pushed me over the upgrade-from-the-ipad2 cliff. Been hanging on, but this is it. Might wait for the retina mini though.
post #8 of 46
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post
Will it work on PDFs/Pages/KN/Numbers -- e.g., being able to write on slides?

 

If the software in question supports it, of course. Should work well in those cases. I don't see how this stylus could/would create a layer of special software injected into anything you could use to open a file.

 

Originally Posted by msimpson View Post
Well at least someone can innovate. Too bad Apple can't recognize that there are a lot of people who would use a stylus with an iPad, just like they originally failed to recognize that people would play games on iPhones and iPad.
 

I dunno… this sounds a lot like total crap.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #9 of 46
Oh nice! Think I might have to go for this!

Oh, now I see iPad 3 and up. Hmmm. Maybe next year.
post #10 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

If the software in question supports it, of course. Should work well in those cases

I am not following you here -- must be feeling a bit slow today!

 

When you say "should work well in those cases," do you mean it works well in the "cases" of PDF/KN/Pages/Numbers (to which I referred), or do you mean "the software in question [that] supports it" to which you refer (in which case, it would be a somewhat tautological statement).

post #11 of 46
@cornchip The Hex3 JaJa works with all older iPads and Android tablets - doesn't use Bluetooth.

For the pressure sensitivity to work the App developers will need to support their SDK. For example, the JaJa stylus is integrated with about 40 Apps for iOS and Android.
post #12 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

I am not following you here -- must be feeling a bit slow today!

 

When you say "should work well in those cases," do you mean it works well in the "cases" of PDF/KN/Pages/Numbers (to which I referred), or do you mean "the software in question [that] supports it" to which you refer (in which case, it would be a somewhat tautological statement).

 

The pen will work across the entire operating system and with all apps - it will just appear as a finger touch... what may or may not be supported is the pressure sensitivity. The drawing apps mentioned in the article all connect to the pen over Bluetooth to detect the pressure of the pen at any given point in the drawing region.

Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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post #13 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I like Wacom's stuff generally, but how can it be "accurate" when the end of it is the size of a baby's finger?

They may have exchangeable nibs ?
There normal drawing pads do.
post #14 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikilok View Post


They may have exchangeable nibs ?
There normal drawing pads do.

looks like they do have exchangeable knobs - but if x/y accuracy is limited by capacitive touch - then its no use for technical sketching - even with pressure. Bet oyu cannot easily and precisely extend a previously drawn line.

post #15 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by cornchip View Post

Oh nice! Think I might have to go for this!

Oh, now I see iPad 3 and up. Hmmm. Maybe next year.

becuae its bluetooth 4.0 so only later iPads. BT4.0 is so much faster connecting, and better than BT2 or BT3  

post #16 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I like Wacom's stuff generally, but how can it be "accurate" when the end of it is the size of a baby's finger?
I stopped playing draw something because I got tired of fingerprinting
post #17 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by HEX3 View Post

@cornchip The Hex3 JaJa works with all older iPads

Yeah, my boss got that the other day, and I was pretty impressed. However, because it uses high frequency, the 3d printer will interfere with it and cause it to act irraticly. And as I work right next to the fab room the drills and grinders would probably fritz it out. Think ill just sell my 2 next year and get the latest and greatest and one of these wacoms. If they don't suck of course.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Right_said_fred View Post

becuae its bluetooth 4.0 so only later iPads. BT4.0 is so much faster connecting, and better than BT2 or BT3  

Yes, I get all that, thanks.
post #18 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Will it work on PDFs/Pages/KN/Numbers -- e.g., being able to write on slides?

 

Once the application is made aware of the stylus it will work on those apps. I have a strong hunch that we'll see a lot of announced apps that are aware of this stylus on Sep 10th. It's no accident that the stylus has just been announced today. LORD, over 2000 pressure levels!!

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #19 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Right_said_fred View Post

looks like they do have exchangeable knobs - but if x/y accuracy is limited by capacitive touch - then its no use for technical sketching - even with pressure. Bet oyu cannot easily and precisely extend a previously drawn line.

 

Most people can't do that with a Bic pen and a ruler.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #20 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by msimpson View Post

Well at least someone can innovate.  [crap]
Too bad Apple can't recognize that there are a lot of people who would use a stylus with an iPad, just like they originally failed to recognize that people would play games on iPhones and iPad.    [DOUBLE crap]
In the later Newton versions, digitizer support and handwriting recognition were actually pretty good. If Apple put half the effort they have into Siri they could add decent stylus and handwriting recognition in iOS and still maintain all the convenience using your fingers gives you when you are dealing with a small device like an iPhone.   [Loooong winded crap]
Apple used to be about empowering people with tools to create, not just consume.  [TOTAL crap]
Lately it does not seem that way.  [pitiful crap... boo-hoo]
I have a Wacom tablet and look forward to seeing if this new stylus will help make the iPad a decent creative tool.  [well, la-de-dah crap]

 

Be sure to wipe and flush when you get ready to log out.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #21 of 46

First, the specs impressed me, then I got to the price and was blown away. 

 

This like finding out your new girlfriend tastes just like bacon...

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #22 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by msimpson View Post

Well at least someone can innovate. Too bad Apple can't recognize that there are a lot of people who would use a stylus with an iPad, just like they originally failed to recognize that people would play games on iPhones and iPad. In the later Newton versions, digitizer support and handwriting recognition were actually pretty good. If Apple put half the effort they have into Siri they could add decent stylus and handwriting recognition in iOS and still maintain all the convenience using your fingers gives you when you are dealing with a small device like an iPhone. Apple used to be about empowering people with tools to create, not just consume. Lately it does not seem that way. I have a Wacom tablet and look forward to seeing if this new stylus will help make the iPad a decent creative tool.

Who should be developing a stylus (or any piece of hardware or software) for the iPad is an interesting question. To me Wacom seems like the company that should be (and are, it appears) developing a good stylus. They've done a great job in the past from what I understand so they must have some expertise. If I was doing art or anything that needed a stylus I'm sure I'd want Apple to make one, they make awesome stuff. But Apple has built a platform that Wacom and many other companies can develop technology on. Apple can't and shouldn't try to do it all. "If Apple wanted to it could..." I'm hearing that more often it seems. And it's usually true, they could. But should they? I think having Apple provide a stylus this early in the evolution of tablets would encourage people to think they were necessary. Imo In the future if they thought they could provide a better tool to artists they might. But I think their focus is intentionally elsewhere right now. Before iOS wasn't Wacom the tool of choice on a Mac (or pc)? I guess maybe it still is?
I can understand really, really wanting Apple to make any particular item, but saying they don't support creativitity seems wrong.
post #23 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Right_said_fred View Post

looks like they do have exchangeable knobs - but if x/y accuracy is limited by capacitive touch - then its no use for technical sketching - even with pressure. Bet oyu cannot easily and precisely extend a previously drawn line.

 

I've used an older stylus and was able to do "technical sketching" just fine. Use a vector graphics tool instead of a bitmap graphic sketch tool.

 

Works a treat...

post #24 of 46

Meh - I did the ipad2+jot touch+procreate and it was ok at best. Moved on to a Lenovo thinkpad2 (Wacom digitizer built in) and ArtRage - and it is a much better set up. I guess if you already have an ipad and do not want to spend more money it is ok, but if starting from scratch there are better options right now.

 

seems to have the same awfull chunky nib as the Pogo connect.

post #25 of 46
Let's see…

  √ Wacom pressure-sensitive stylus

  √ iOS system-wide "tele-strator" software and SDK

  √ 12 inch 256 GB iPad

  √ USB 3.1 10 Gbps Lightening support -- including HD video I/O


Could be ready for March Madness… Bring Madden out of retirement… Be part of every "live news" kit… Interactive Apple Maps, Pages, Keynote… Interactive interface to FCPX and other Pro apps…


Nah! Meh… nothin' here -- move on!
Edited by Dick Applebaum - 8/20/13 at 1:43am
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post #26 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by msimpson View Post

Well at least someone can innovate. Too bad Apple can't recognize that there are a lot of people who would use a stylus with an iPad, just like they originally failed to recognize that people would play games on iPhones and iPad. In the later Newton versions, digitizer support and handwriting recognition were actually pretty good. If Apple put half the effort they have into Siri they could add decent stylus and handwriting recognition in iOS and still maintain all the convenience using your fingers gives you when you are dealing with a small device like an iPhone. Apple used to be about empowering people with tools to create, not just consume. Lately it does not seem that way. I have a Wacom tablet and look forward to seeing if this new stylus will help make the iPad a decent creative tool.

Ugh ! Your getting it wrong. The stylus helps only to enhance particular segments like drawing. It's not intended for anything else. Which is why applications are designed the way they are. Apple has that notion right while Wacom also has the notion right that to draw ur better off with a pen than ur fingers.
post #27 of 46
Tip still thick as a crayon, I know, it's Apple's fault. At some point future iPads might support proper pen input. Until then we're supposed to draw thin pencil lines with a thick crayon.
post #28 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

Tip still thick as a crayon, I know, it's Apple's fault. At some point future iPads might support proper pen input. Until then we're supposed to draw thin pencil lines with a thick crayon.

You can zoom to a pixel level with a software loupe -- been doing that since MacPaint onthe original Mac.
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post #29 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by msimpson View Post

Well at least someone can innovate. Too bad Apple can't recognize that there are a lot of people who would use a stylus with an iPad, just like they originally failed to recognize that people would play games on iPhones and iPad. In the later Newton versions, digitizer support and handwriting recognition were actually pretty good. If Apple put half the effort they have into Siri they could add decent stylus and handwriting recognition in iOS and still maintain all the convenience using your fingers gives you when you are dealing with a small device like an iPhone. Apple used to be about empowering people with tools to create, not just consume. Lately it does not seem that way. I have a Wacom tablet and look forward to seeing if this new stylus will help make the iPad a decent creative tool.

I couldn't have said it better myself.  I usually can't, but I've said this before.  If Apple want's the Notes or Pages app to replace the paper notepad and pen, they're going to have to make the iPad function like one.  Being a Architect, we use notepad to sketch, take notes, annotate, etc. during meetings.  What a joy this would be if the Notes app could doodle, transcribe handwriting and be a little bit more free-form when it comes to taking notes.  Just think of all the school-based uses this could have!?  Then add scalable grid paper to 1/8" or 1/4" grids an you have a really powerful tool for just about anyone.  I know Jobs shunned the Newton, but that was over 10 year prior to the launch of the iOS.  Surely by now  there must be some people at Apple that think this is a good idea now.

post #30 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Will it work on PDFs/Pages/KN/Numbers -- e.g., being able to write on slides?

 

I think this is unlikely as these kind of styluses (which have been available from others for a long time now) require the app to support it in a way that can seriously affect the design of the app.  I don't see Pages or any of Apple's software allowing that sort of thing.  Basic sketch and drawing apps (all of whom are still desperate for new users) will likely support it based on Wacoms name alone. 

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


You can zoom to a pixel level with a software loupe -- been doing that since MacPaint onthe original Mac.

 

That makes it possible, but it still isn't proper drawing.  After a few minutes of that it will drive you crazy. Imagine having to zoom in in real life, on a real drawing and you can immediately see that this "solution" isn't really a solution. 

post #32 of 46
Hard to imagine that this will blow away the pogo connect. It's an awesome Bluetooth 4.0 pen with pressure sensitivity, I'm using it with procreate and am thrilled. Looking at some if the procreate examples will blow your mind, awesome stuff.,

http://procreate.si go about half way down
post #33 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by msimpson View Post

Well at least someone can innovate. Too bad Apple can't recognize that there are a lot of people who would use a stylus with an iPad, just like they originally failed to recognize that people would play games on iPhones and iPad. In the later Newton versions, digitizer support and handwriting recognition were actually pretty good. If Apple put half the effort they have into Siri they could add decent stylus and handwriting recognition in iOS and still maintain all the convenience using your fingers gives you when you are dealing with a small device like an iPhone. Apple used to be about empowering people with tools to create, not just consume. Lately it does not seem that way. I have a Wacom tablet and look forward to seeing if this new stylus will help make the iPad a decent creative tool.

Ridiculous rant! Give it a rest - what do you think these third parties are doing?
post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

You can zoom to a pixel level with a software loupe -- been doing that since MacPaint onthe original Mac.

While this is true, I agree that the time has come that hopefully Apple is looking into a finer level of writing etc for the iPads. Not scads of pressure support, frankly I don't think that many folks would really need it. But perhaps a mild amount Iike 80-100 levels with smaller touch points. Many businesses are using iPads for signing legal documents, heck even Apple does, so better cleaner handwriting support would be in order. It would also improve drawing etc.

A some kind of system wide SDK support for these third party devices so they work with all apps wouldn't be out of order.

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post #35 of 46

Cool, I guess. But the nib is so big, that it doesn't seem to be better than the Pogo connect. And not even close to as accurate as the Jot Touch 4

post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Right_said_fred View Post

looks like they do have exchangeable knobs - but if x/y accuracy is limited by capacitive touch - then its no use for technical sketching - even with pressure. Bet oyu cannot easily and precisely extend a previously drawn line.

Is hand-drawn accuracy really an issue in technical drawing?

 

In fact, is hand drawing really an issue in technical drawing?

post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

That makes it possible, but it still isn't proper drawing.  After a few minutes of that it will drive you crazy. Imagine having to zoom in in real life, on a real drawing and you can immediately see that this "solution" isn't really a solution. 

LOL. Ever done pointillism?

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post #38 of 46
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

When you say "should work well in those cases," do you mean it works well in the "cases" of PDF/KN/Pages/Numbers (to which I referred), or do you mean "the software in question [that] supports it" to which you refer (in which case, it would be a somewhat tautological statement).

 

The former; apologies. 

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

The former; apologies. 

maybe your best ever post on this forum.
15" uMacbook Pro 2.4Ghz 8GB 128GB SSD/500GB 7200rpm, iMac 27" i5 16GB 1TB, MacBook Air 8GB 256GB, iPhone 5s 64GB, iPhone 4 32GB, iPad 4 64GB, Apple TV2/3, iPod Nano 2nd gen, iPod Touch 4th gen,...
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15" uMacbook Pro 2.4Ghz 8GB 128GB SSD/500GB 7200rpm, iMac 27" i5 16GB 1TB, MacBook Air 8GB 256GB, iPhone 5s 64GB, iPhone 4 32GB, iPad 4 64GB, Apple TV2/3, iPod Nano 2nd gen, iPod Touch 4th gen,...
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post #40 of 46
It's cool, I guess. But the Jot Touch 4 is more precise, and it's cheaper.
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