or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Waze realtime incident reports now appear in Google Maps for Apple's iOS
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Waze realtime incident reports now appear in Google Maps for Apple's iOS - Page 2

post #41 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Not that it matters much, since Glass is going to be illegal to wear while driving.

Why should it be illegal? Seems just as safe as tuning the radio or adjusting the air.. It can be completely hands off and once it's integrated with the iPhone (still to come) connecting to Mercedes "Digital Drivetime" Cloud features it opens up a whole new world for the connected car.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #42 of 76
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
Why should it be illegal?

 

Ut tut tut. I don't recall saying it should be illegal, just that it would be illegal. Don't misrepresent. 1tongue.gif

 

For the record, it should be illegal. Unless it can indeed be hands/eyes free, as you said.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #43 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

An actual, physical feature OF the car will get banned? Listen to yourself. Next you'll say it will be illegal to look at your dashboard while driving.

Any physical interaction that involves features of your smartphone, whether proxied on the car dash or not, will be banned, it's just a matter of time. It's not that hard to understand.

post #44 of 76
Did you use this username because no one else pats you on the back? Or maybe they do, out of pity, 3 times no less.
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
post #45 of 76
Originally Posted by patpatpat View Post
Any physical interaction that involves features of your smartphone, whether proxied on the car dash or not, will be banned, it's just a matter of time. It's not that hard to understand.

 

It is, given that this is utter nonsense. Your RPM meter on the dashboard is a proxy of the engine's revolutions. Your temperature gauge is a proxy of the actual temperature. Should we climb outside the car, open the hood, and take its temperature should we need it? Or maybe the engine should be connected via a metal heat sink to the underside of your seat so that you can feel just how hot the engine is at all times?

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #46 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Did you use this username because no one else pats you on the back? Or maybe they do, out of pity, 3 times no less.

Says the guy called Boogie? lol.gif

post #47 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

It is, given that this is utter nonsense. Your RPM meter on the dashboard is a proxy of the engine's revolutions. Your temperature gauge is a proxy of the actual temperature. Should we climb outside the car, open the hood, and take its temperature should we need it? Or maybe the engine should be connected via a metal heat sink to the underside of your seat so that you can feel just how hot the engine is at all times?

When's the last time you touched your RPM meter?

post #48 of 76
Nice update!
post #49 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

I think he means that "crowdsource" on Waze is actively reported by users, and therefore inaccurate (since it's reported by people). The crowdsourcing in iOS is being done by iOS, not people, and therefore more precise. This is key to understanding why Google creates mediocre software apps, and Apple goes out of there way to create something useful. To boot; it shows how little the pro-Google crowd actually understands any of Apples motives to do something right.

You've assumed I don't understand any of the motives in user location tracking, or referring to "others" instead?

No, I'm not saying that you don't understand the motives. I'm saying the motives differ, vastly, between Google and Apple. I think Google does their regular 'see what sticks' thing (wiki), and Apple thinks about user experience, added benefit.
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
post #50 of 76
Originally Posted by patpatpat View Post
When's the last time you touched your RPM meter?

 

Guess it should be illegal to turn, too, since you have to move your hand to activate the signal. Guess it should be illegal to wipe the windshield, too, since you have to move your hand to turn the wipers on.

 

Your position is complete nonsense. It's possible that more functions of a smartphone, under direct use of said phone, will be banned in more places, but it is ludicrous to suggest that all functions of all phones will be banned, even if they are directly integrated into the physical vehicle itself, whether hands-free or via touching a button.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #51 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

No, I'm not saying that you don't understand the motives. I'm saying the motives differ, vastly, between Google and Apple. I think Google does their regular 'see what sticks' thing (wiki), and Apple thinks about user experience, added benefit.

How do you think Google Maps improved so quickly after they were released? They haven't been around all that long really. Crowd-sourced error reporting and local knowledge, just like what Apple is doing. Plus a few key purchases, again just like Apple is doing.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #52 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Guess it should be illegal to turn, too, since you have to move your hand to activate the signal. Guess it should be illegal to wipe the windshield, too, since you have to move your hand to turn the wipers on.

 

Your position is complete nonsense. It's possible that more functions of a smartphone, under direct use of said phone, will be banned in more places, but it is ludicrous to suggest that all functions of all phones will be banned, even if they are directly integrated into the physical vehicle itself, whether hands-free or via touching a button.

 

Wow you still have these on your car?

 

http://www.secondchancegarage.com/articles/wiper-history/1920-kissel-gold-bug-windshield-wiper.png

 

 

Last time I looked I didn't have to move both my hands from the steering wheel, nor move my eyes from the road to do either or both of the things you describe above.

post #53 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Of course. I'm glad someone mentioned that. That's inherently different, though. All you have to do with Waze is tell them what the problem is and they'll put it up. With Apple, they wait for a significant number of identical (or near identical) reports before looking into the change themselves. THEN putting it up.

 

By what I'm seeing, Waze is basically Twitter for vehicular disasters. No pun intended that Twitter causes vehicular disasters.

 

The comparison between crowdsourcing traffic reports and POI data is meaningless. Any user contributions to permanent map features will certainly be vetted before publication. Traffic conditions however are time sensitive and could change in a matter of minutes. You risk the information becoming worthless if you wait too long to publish it.

post #54 of 76

 

That's pretty cool, really.


Last time I looked I didn't have to move both my hands from the steering wheel, nor move my eyes from the road to do either or both of the things you describe above.

 

Funny. Because the same is true of everything I said with a phone integrated into the car.

 

Run along now, troll. Find another website, even.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #55 of 76

For starters, we can thank Google for giving credit to which company is to be more like - and that's Apple.  They have copied Apple's web browser by taking an earlier build of Webkit; creating a more resource consuming version called Chrome - which does not even do all of which Safari and Webkit do.  They have also copied Apple's mobile OS by having a former employee who worked in the same department of when multi-touch was being made and they have created Android, an OS that although on most phones and on all carriers, these carriers beg for the opportunity to become an official seller/carrier of the iPhone to keep their business alive in the near future.  Once again, they have taken a group of former Apple employees whom Apple is not interested in rehiring - this being Waze - and have included a me too feature to show consumers that they are just like Apple.  A few months ago, Appleinsider wrote an article about how the iOS team is including the features that they would want to have from Waze without rehiring their former employees - a smart move by the team who let these employees leave for a reason and have hardly enough interest in bringing them back.  Google, thank you for showing us the consumers how true saying of "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery."; and just how pathetic you are.  Your Chrome OS is what Linux co-founder called reckless computing, and Android is a nest waiting for more malware that it's worse than a Windows desktop.  Very pathetic, Google!

post #56 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Funny. Because the same is true of everything I said with a phone integrated into the car.

 

Run along now, troll. Find another website, even.

So that nice image you posted of "ios in the car" was not a touchscreen then. hmm.  1eek.gif

 

Nice try.

post #57 of 76
Originally Posted by patpatpat View Post
So that nice image you posted of "ios in the car" was not a touchscreen then. hmm.  

 

Sure doesn't require "moving both hands from the steering wheel", does it.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #58 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

How do you think Google Maps improved so quickly after they were released? They haven't been around all that long really. Crowd-sourced error reporting and local knowledge, just like what Apple is doing. Plus a few key purchases, again just like Apple is doing.

I don't think they wanted to be rolled over by 'some software company',
Really felt annoyed and all sh!t hit the fan when Apple didn't extend their maps data licensing,
Simply had to do better than what they offered on iOS (I understand that Android uses vector based maps).

They bought it in 2004 from Where 2 Technologies, who have been working on it for, I don't know how long. Apple supposedly has been working on it since 2009, but digging up solid facts is difficult with this company.

Apple bought 6 mapping related companies, Google 3 - to the best of my knowledge. That doesn't mean Google relies more on user input. I'm just saying Google has a history of getting more info from its users than what they're saying. Like the WiFi and passwords while driving their Street View cars.

I have read Apple was collecting crowdsourced data in order to build their Maps app, though all reports point to anonymous collection.

Google? I just don't trust the company.
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
post #59 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Sure doesn't require "moving both hands from the steering wheel", does it.

California law prohibits any interactions with your smartphone, period, one handed or two. Just because the interactions are now proxied to a touchscreen on the dash will make no difference in the end run. It's no different than mounting your smartphone in the dash.
post #60 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by macm37 View Post

For starters, we can thank Google for giving credit to which company is to be more like - and that's Apple.  They have copied Apple's web browser by taking an earlier build of Webkit; creating a more resource consuming version called Chrome - which does not even do all of which Safari and Webkit do.  

 

Chrome upon its release exceeded Safari in several respects, such as security. Safari didn't isolate each tab in its own sandboxed process until later. In fact per tab processes appears to be one of the upcoming features announced at this year's wwdc.


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 8/20/13 at 2:12pm
post #61 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post



Google? I just don't trust the company.

Certainly fair enough. If Google has done something to lose your trust then so be it. . . .

And IMO that's why Google can probably be trusted for the most part. They couldn't afford a billion people like you losing trust, their entire business depends on it.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #62 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Certainly fair enough. If Google has done something to lose your trust then so be it. . . .

And IMO that's why Google can probably be trusted for the most part. They couldn't afford a billion people like you losing trust, their entire business depends on it.

Gatorguy says you can trust Google.

Now who's been drinking the Gatorade?

1wink.gif
"That’s brilliant. I can see this annoying some people, but what doesn’t these days?" - PMZ
Reply
"That’s brilliant. I can see this annoying some people, but what doesn’t these days?" - PMZ
Reply
post #63 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Not that it matters much, since Glass is going to be illegal to wear while driving.

This is true.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #64 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by patpatpat View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Sure doesn't require "moving both hands from the steering wheel", does it.

California law prohibits any interactions with your smartphone, period, one handed or two. Just because the interactions are now proxied to a touchscreen on the dash will make no difference in the end run. It's no different than mounting your smartphone in the dash.

 

So why does California Law permit interactions with any vehicle controls, such as audio, navigation touch screens, heating, gear lever etc.?  With that inconsistency your extrapolation of existing law on cell phone interactions leads to absurd conclusions. You are speculating, and not very intelligently.

post #65 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

 

So why does California Law permit interactions with any vehicle controls, such as audio, navigation touch screens, heating, gear lever etc.?  With that inconsistency your extrapolation of existing law on cell phone interactions leads to absurd conclusions. You are speculating, and not very intelligently.

 

You have to look where all this is going. More and more car makers are adding more and more features to car dashes in an attempt to attract buyers. It won't be long before these will all be restricted as well.

 

How hard is it to extrapolate that if touching the screen of a smartphone in any way is illegal, that touching another screen which is displaying data/graphics generated by a smartphone is also illegal?

 

This is where it is going and will get to the point that the interfaces are so dumb and restricted that they become pointless.

 

 

>>>>>

 

Automakers would have to rethink the kind of electronic devices and the number of these devices used within a vehicle

The first guidelines for reducing distracted driving were proposed by Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood yesterday, where automakers would be challenged to cut the number of in-vehicle entertainment and information electronics.

"Distracted driving is a dangerous and deadly habit on America's roadways -- that's why I've made it a priority to encourage people to stay focused behind the wheel," said LaHood. "These guidelines are a major step forward in identifying real solutions to tackle the issue of distracted driving for drivers of all ages."

post #66 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by patpatpat View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

 

So why does California Law permit interactions with any vehicle controls, such as audio, navigation touch screens, heating, gear lever etc.?  With that inconsistency your extrapolation of existing law on cell phone interactions leads to absurd conclusions. You are speculating, and not very intelligently.

 

You have to look where all this is going. More and more car makers are adding more and more features to car dashes in an attempt to attract buyers. It won't be long before these will all be restricted as well.

 

How hard is it to extrapolate that if touching the screen of a smartphone in any way is illegal, that touching another screen which is displaying data/graphics generated by a smartphone is also illegal?

 

This is where it is going and will get to the point that the interfaces are so dumb and restricted that they become pointless.

 

 

>>>>>

 

Automakers would have to rethink the kind of electronic devices and the number of these devices used within a vehicle

The first guidelines for reducing distracted driving were proposed by Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood yesterday, where automakers would be challenged to cut the number of in-vehicle entertainment and information electronics.

"Distracted driving is a dangerous and deadly habit on America's roadways -- that's why I've made it a priority to encourage people to stay focused behind the wheel," said LaHood. "These guidelines are a major step forward in identifying real solutions to tackle the issue of distracted driving for drivers of all ages."

 

It's not clear at all where it is going.  You are guessing at a particular direction based on one state law, recent proposals to restrict driver activities unrelated to driving, such as texting, and then making a blanket (and impossible) suggestion that drivers will be banned from hands-on interactions with any device in a vehicle, integrated or not. However, the current proliferation of mobile devices as primary navigation tools raises different considerations.  One could argue strongly that these navigation tools are much safer for drivers to use than, for example, trying to read paper maps, and so it would be foolish to ban them and I doubt very much whether that will happen. Mobile and auto technology will instead adapt, as it is already doing, and enable safer use of devices.

post #67 of 76
Google Maps is the best Maps solution for iOS, but it is missing a key feature, at least for me (traffic in the bay area is crazy!), i.e., re-routing based on traffic and Waze does this so well. Waze almost re-routes me through parking lots of downtown hi-rises to save tons of time everyday! But Waze has issues with its search and Points of Interest and now, like predicted, Google is integrating the good stuff from both of these mapping solutions!

http://thefrustum.com/blog/2013/8/9/the-ios-maps-problem
post #68 of 76

Originally posted by d4NjvRzf,

 

Chrome upon its release exceeded Safari in several respects, such as security. Safari didn't isolate each tab in its own sandboxed process until later. In fact per tab processes appears to be one of the upcoming features announced at this year's wwdc.

 

Excuse me, but you are really missing the point of my post in that what Steve Jobs had to say about introducing features.  He basically said that Apple may not always be the first to introduce some new feature, but when Apple does it, they make sure that they do it the best.  When we read about which browser is used most on OS X, Safari is by far the choice over Chrome - Chrome may be fast, but Safari is these days just as fast and Chrome uses more resources; a wiki when it comes to Chrome vs. Firefox will tell anyone that Firefox is more secure than Chrome.  What it boils to in the end is the user experience and when we look at why Chrome and Android gets looked over sometimes, it's simply because that they are products that were made in a rush and that their developers cared more about market share than the user experience.

post #69 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by macm37 View Post

 What it boils to in the end is the user experience and when we look at why Chrome and Android gets looked over sometimes, it's simply because that they are products that were made in a rush and that their developers cared more about market share than the user experience.

Here's a question then. If the user experience is so poor with Chrome, how did it become the most-used web browser in the world by some accounts? It's not automatically installed with Windows like Explorer is, nor is the automatic default browser choice with Apple products where Safari rules. Folks need to consciously choose it as their browser. Why would they do that, and why would they stick with it if it's so bad?
Edited by Gatorguy - 8/21/13 at 3:27am
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #70 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Here's a question then. If the user experience is so poor with Chrome, how did it become the most-used web browser in the world by some accounts? It's not automatically installed with Windows like Explorer is, nor is the automatic default browser choice with Apple products where Safari rules. Folks need to consciously choose it as their browser. Why would they do that, and why would they stick with it if it's so bad?

It's definitely not always by choice; install any kind of Windows utility (most of which should already be embedded in any OS) and bang, you got Chrome. Like PDFcreator, tools like that. They hide the option where you can deselect to install Chrome for a reason.

Whether it gets used or not I don't know. I do know that Google Maps on Windows tells me I shouldn't use Safari, but a 'modern browser (whatever that means, many people still using IE8, so that must be modern as well) so I can enjoy the full experience. Well, I looked at the data throughput on that Windows box and saw a slowdown when using Safari compared to IE10. Not rendering Maps, no data throughput.

And that puts me off.
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
post #71 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

It's definitely not always by choice; install any kind of Windows utility (most of which should already be embedded in any OS) and bang, you got Chrome. Like PDFcreator, tools like that. They hide the option where you can deselect to install Chrome for a reason.

Whether it gets used or not I don't know. I do know that Google Maps on Windows tells me I shouldn't use Safari, but a 'modern browser (whatever that means, many people still using IE8, so that must be modern as well) so I can enjoy the full experience. Well, I looked at the data throughput on that Windows box and saw a slowdown when using Safari compared to IE10. Not rendering Maps, no data throughput.

And that puts me off.

I've never come across Chrome as a tag-along with some 3rd party utility but I've no doubt it has been done. What totally riles me is Oracle using a Java update to install the Ask Toolbar by default, regarded as malware by many and really tough to get rid of. Or more recently a terrible change to Advanced System Care, a top Windows maintenance utility, which now adds invisable tracking toolbars for Amazon, Bing and Yahoo among others enabled by default within the first dialog box. Worse, even if the user becomes aware they were installed and removes them ASC will just reinstall them when it's next run.

There's some sneaky activities going on with some of the 3rd party add-ons and users gotta be careful what they're approving.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #72 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by macm37 View Post

Originally posted by d4NjvRzf,

 

Chrome upon its release exceeded Safari in several respects, such as security. Safari didn't isolate each tab in its own sandboxed process until later. In fact per tab processes appears to be one of the upcoming features announced at this year's wwdc.

 

Excuse me, but you are really missing the point of my post in that what Steve Jobs had to say about introducing features.  He basically said that Apple may not always be the first to introduce some new feature, but when Apple does it, they make sure that they do it the best.  When we read about which browser is used most on OS X, Safari is by far the choice over Chrome - Chrome may be fast, but Safari is these days just as fast and Chrome uses more resources; a wiki when it comes to Chrome vs. Firefox will tell anyone that Firefox is more secure than Chrome.  What it boils to in the end is the user experience and when we look at why Chrome and Android gets looked over sometimes, it's simply because that they are products that were made in a rush and that their developers cared more about market share than the user experience.

 

Your post doesn't say anything about Apple introducing features correctly but not necessarily first. Your examples try to support the claim that Google tend to create half-baked copies of Apple products that were, a fortiori, first to market. 

 

Here is your post, which I've reformatted slightly to highlight your examples.

Quote:
Originally Posted by macm37 View Post

For starters, we can thank Google for giving credit to which company is to be more like - and that's Apple.  

 

They have copied Apple's web browser by taking an earlier build of Webkit; creating a more resource consuming version called Chrome - which does not even do all of which Safari and Webkit do.  

 

They have also copied Apple's mobile OS by having a former employee who worked in the same department of when multi-touch was being made and they have created Android, an OS that although on most phones and on all carriers, these carriers beg for the opportunity to become an official seller/carrier of the iPhone to keep their business alive in the near future.  

 

Once again, they have taken a group of former Apple employees whom Apple is not interested in rehiring - this being Waze - and have included a me too feature to show consumers that they are just like Apple....

 

 

You dinged Chrome for being more resource consuming when it actually does something useful with those extra resources -- namely, by isolating each tab in its own process. While most browsers today are fairly comparable in security features, that wasn't the case when chrome first came out. Chrome is an example of a product done right that was last to market.


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 8/21/13 at 8:07am
post #73 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I've never come across Chrome as a tag-along with some 3rd party utility but I've no doubt it has been done. What totally riles me is Oracle using a Java update to install the Ask Toolbar by default, regarded as malware by many and really tough to get rid of. Or more recently a terrible change to Advanced System Care, a top Windows maintenance utility, which now adds invisable tracking toolbars for Amazon, Bing and Yahoo among others enabled by default within the first dialog box. Worse, even if the user becomes aware they were installed and removes them ASC will just reinstall them when it's next run.

There's some sneaky activities going on with some of the 3rd party add-ons and users gotta be careful what they're approving.

Wow, that's truly pathetic. That shouldn't even be legal, actually.

Microsoft have their Signature Program, creating a crapware-free PC. Doubt it will make an impact, but its an effort.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2404520,00.asp
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
post #74 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Wow, that's truly pathetic. That shouldn't even be legal, actually.

Microsoft have their Signature Program, creating a crapware-free PC. Doubt it will make an impact, but its an effort.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2404520,00.asp

Here's what the Oracle and Ask Toolbar scheme is about. Yes, absolutely pathetic.
http://www.zdnet.com/a-close-look-at-how-oracle-installs-deceptive-software-with-java-updates-7000010038/
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #75 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Here's what the Oracle and Ask Toolbar scheme is about. Yes, absolutely pathetic.
http://www.zdnet.com/a-close-look-at-how-oracle-installs-deceptive-software-with-java-updates-7000010038/

Huh, fancy that, a 10 minute delay for the Ask toolbar execution. Well, at least 'browsers are taking action'. Good to read on Ninite, thanks for the link.
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
post #76 of 76
Originally Posted by patpatpat View Post
California law prohibits any interactions with your smartphone, period, one handed or two. Just because the interactions are now proxied to a touchscreen on the dash will make no difference in the end run. It's no different than mounting your smartphone in the dash.

 

Yeah, no, that's completely and utterly wrong in every respect. For the reasons, see the many examples of vehicle interaction I've already provided. If you choose to ignore them again, that's your problem. I'm not really big on arguing with willful ignorance anymore.

 

Originally Posted by patpatpat View Post

You have to look where all this is going.

 

No, we have to look at where it is right now, because that's the only thing you seem to care about until it doesn't suit your argument. Then you move it to the future. Right now, you can touch your car. It's a pretty simple concept to grasp. If it's physically part of the car, you can interact with it. Therefore if there is integration with the physical aspects of the car, it doesn't matter what is being integrated. If there's a Siri button on my steering wheel, it cannot possibly be illegal to touch said button.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
  • Waze realtime incident reports now appear in Google Maps for Apple's iOS
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Waze realtime incident reports now appear in Google Maps for Apple's iOS