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TiVo's new Roamio DVRs stream content directly to Apple's iPhones, iPads

post #1 of 18
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TiVo on Tuesday announced its first major update to its line of digital video recorders in three years, giving buyers the opportunity to stream content from a DVR to an iOS-powered device such as an iPhone or iPad.

Tivo Roamio


The new line of Roamio DVRs are now stepping onto turf previously occupied by devices such as the Slingbox, though TiVo's new lineup has a wider feature set than does the Slingbox. In adding streaming to mobile functionality, the new DVRs subsume the features of a pre-existing TiVo device, the TiVo Stream add-on box. That device paired with TiVo Premiere DVRs to stream to iOS devices.

Most of the Roamio DVRs will be able to stream live and recorded content to iOS devices outside of the home, but that functionality will not be available until some months after the Roamio line launches. That capability will likely come in the form of a firmware update.

The Roamio line will also have capabilities similar to Google's recently unveiled Chromecast streaming device. Users will be able to start up a YouTube video or Netflix movie on an iPhone or iPad and then have the TiVo begin streaming the content.

TiVo's new product lineup line will come in three models:
  • The basic TiVo Roamio, priced at $200, will allow users to watch or record up to four simultaneous shows. It will also record up to 75 hours of HD video, but it will not be able to stream content to mobile devices without the $130 TiVo Stream.
  • The Roamio Plus, for $400, will record up to six simultaneous shows and can hold up to 150 hours of HD video. It will have the iOS streaming functionality built in.
  • At the high-end of the line will be the Roamio Pro. That device will record up to 450 hours of HD video and will have all of the streaming capabilities of the Roamio Plus. It will retail for $600.
post #2 of 18
I fear Tivo may be a little too late to this rapidly changing technological landscape with their entire concept.
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post #3 of 18
Can't wait to stream video to my 4-inch iPhone screen instead of that 58-inch plasma on my wall. What an improvement! /s/
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post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I fear Tivo may be a little too late to this rapidly changing technological landscape with their entire concept.

 

I don't think so.  Tivo may be the only Internet connected device that includes an actual OTA receiver, providing  streaming of broadcast TV to iDevices.  For those of us that have cut the cable TV cord, it is a unique and very capable device.  Plus, it provides those services only to Apple products (so far).  I am surprised there has not been more discussion of Apple acquiring TiVo.  

post #5 of 18
Thanks to streaming services like Hulu, the writing is on the wall for DVR appliances.

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post #6 of 18
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Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Thanks to streaming services like Hulu, the writing is on the wall for DVR appliances.

Not for control freaks like me who have a far wider taste in what we want available than either Hulu or Netflix. Maybe someday but not so far...

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCGOO View Post

I don't think so.  Tivo may be the only Internet connected device that includes an actual OTA receiver, providing  streaming of broadcast TV to iDevices.  For those of us that have cut the cable TV cord, it is a unique and very capable device.  Plus, it provides those services only to Apple products (so far).  I am surprised there has not been more discussion of Apple acquiring TiVo.  


I cut the cord two years ago, relying entirely on the internet. I hadn't spotted the OTA angle, but the problem with OTA is it is obviously not on demand which was my point about things changing. The world (OK I mean 'developed world') is moving rapidly to on demand where recording is not part of the equation.
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post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCGOO View Post

 

I don't think so.  Tivo may be the only Internet connected device that includes an actual OTA receiver, providing  streaming of broadcast TV to iDevices.  For those of us that have cut the cable TV cord, it is a unique and very capable device.  Plus, it provides those services only to Apple products (so far).  I am surprised there has not been more discussion of Apple acquiring TiVo.  

 

 

Except for Slingbox.....

 

But I do believe that Tivo has more brand awareness than Slingbox, so it'll probably be more popular. The only thing is that per their agreements with providers, not everything will be available. I believe that Slingbox bypasses all the provider BS. But I could be wrong.

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCGOO View Post

 

I don't think so.  Tivo may be the only Internet connected device that includes an actual OTA receiver, providing  streaming of broadcast TV to iDevices.  For those of us that have cut the cable TV cord, it is a unique and very capable device.  Plus, it provides those services only to Apple products (so far).  I am surprised there has not been more discussion of Apple acquiring TiVo.  

 

tivo and apple tv are good complements to eachother.  The apple tv offers wonderful content in areas that tivo really stinks at, launching netflix applet for example that uses different remote control button behaviors, and is completely different in GUI and function from the tivo main gui.

 

Tivo does however have great cablecard dvr functionallity.  The new gui in the roamios looks promising. 

 

I have always longed for apple to buy tivo, gut them and release an apple tv cablecard dvr but unfortunately the cablecard standard is highly restrictive and can be political.  Not sure apple would fit well being so constrained.

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post #10 of 18

The new TiVo boxes look very enticing, however, I just purchased a Premiere XL4 to add to my TiVo household.

Not everyone wants to "cut the cord" with cable. This might make sense for a college student or someone living alone, but not for a family. Plus, I don't want to watch commercials or be limited to what's available on the different streaming services. I tried Netflix and it was awful, with the only decent content consisting of older tv series from HBO.

 

So TiVo offers a premium experience for users who can't stand to use the horrible hardware and software that you can rent from your cable provider. It's the closest thing to an Apple-like experience we can hope for until Apple decides to enter the market.

 

I tried using a Motorolla DVR for my bedroom tv and I couldn't tolerate it for the short time I had it. It was load, inaccurate, not user-friendly, didn't allow you to block channels you don't receive or do not wish to watch from your on-screen guide - the biggest piece of crap ever. I gladly spent $300 to rid myself of that DVR and now enjoy two TiVos networked together. I do wish TiVo service was cheaper, but the cost of the service and the CableCards from the cable company wash with the cost of renting their POS. So, I'm only out the cost of the TiVo.

 

Until you can get EVERYTHING you want from one location (like music from iTunes), I don't see any of the other services (Hulu, Netflix, Crackle, etc) having any advantage. Most people want to watch tv on a large HDTV, not their iMac or MacBook Pro. Those are nice secondary devices, along with the iPad and iPhone, but are just that - secondary. Any solution, like TiVo, also has to be easy enough for everyone (kids, grandparents, wife) to use. 

post #11 of 18
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Originally Posted by jfc1138 View Post

Not for control freaks like me who have a far wider taste in what we want available than either Hulu or Netflix. Maybe someday but not so far...

I have to agree with you. I find much of Netflix and Hulu programming to be somewhere in the spectrum of mediocre-to-fairly useless.

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

I have to agree with you. I find much of Netflix and Hulu programming to be somewhere in the spectrum of mediocre-to-fairly useless.

+1 on that

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


I cut the cord two years ago, relying entirely on the internet. I hadn't spotted the OTA angle, but the problem with OTA is it is obviously not on demand which was my point about things changing. The world (OK I mean 'developed world') is moving rapidly to on demand where recording is not part of the equation.

 

That is where the recording capabilities cut in.  It IS on demand, for recorded OTA content.  Plus even better, this new version can record 4 OTA streams simultaneously.  The current model is limited to 2 OTA.  I have a single digital TV in the living room.  Our other screens are multiple iPads, that can stream different recorded content simultaneously with live streaming (if you can tolerate the advertising).  TiVo over the air, (or cable) has no restricted content.  If you can see it on the TV, you can record it, and stream it to the iPad, or download it to the iPad for later unconnected use. (downloads take a little time, about 15-20 minutes per hour of content). The TiVo Stream, supports gigabit ethernet, which helps.   Only requirement is cabled ethernet connections are required. Wifi won't support the required full duplex bandwidth. That might be a deal breaker for some installations.

post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfc1138 View Post

Not for control freaks like me who have a far wider taste in what we want available than either Hulu or Netflix. Maybe someday but not so far...

Ditto for me.

I have an Apple TV, and I have a Roku. But if I didn't have my Premier, I just wouldn't have a TV. It's that simple. Nothing compares to the TiVo.

post #15 of 18
Please get a worldwide perspective on this. OTA TV is not rubbish everywhere - in the UK it varies between acceptable and excellent. I (and I suspect most people) will only switch over to using an Apple TV experience for a majority of my viewing (which is an essential part of Apple making a success of TV) when access to broadcast TV is part of that experience and not a different mode.

This product potentially offers that capability and this is why, IMHV, products like this are critical and key for Apple in unlocking the TV market, at least in all regions where OTA TV is still a large part of people's viewing.

The other big players in TV in the UK are Sky satellite and Virgin cable, and both of those have network-connected boxes which could also be embraced into the Apple TV experience through provision of iOS apps.

Internet-only viewing may become the norm everywhere in time, but until that time there will be a transitionary period and it is crucial that Apple embraces this rather than attempting arrogantly to reinvent TV in its own vision before the market is ready.
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post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCGOO View Post

That is where the recording capabilities cut in.  It IS on demand, for recorded OTA content.  Plus even better, this new version can record 4 OTA streams simultaneously.  The current model is limited to 2 OTA.  I have a single digital TV in the living room.  Our other screens are multiple iPads, that can stream different recorded content simultaneously with live streaming (if you can tolerate the advertising).  TiVo over the air, (or cable) has no restricted content.  If you can see it on the TV, you can record it, and stream it to the iPad, or download it to the iPad for later unconnected use. (downloads take a little time, about 15-20 minutes per hour of content). The TiVo Stream, supports gigabit ethernet, which helps.   Only requirement is cabled ethernet connections are required. Wifi won't support the required full duplex bandwidth. That might be a deal breaker for some installations.

I used a Tivo for years back in the day and thought I'd met the future. So I know what you mean, yes recording live OTA TV is 'on demand' if only locally. It is an excellent point and you are correct.

My original point was we are heading into new times and hence my comment that Tivo's business model is too late. The need for recording will not exist because even OTA TV as we know it won't be here for much longer as it is now. There is a huge paradigm shift in the making is all I am saying. I truly suspect there will only be streamed, on demand content in a few years and people will reminisce about the days of real time TV the same we we do about pay phone boxes. Teenagers will laugh in disbelief in ten years when parents tell them 'about a time when TV shows were on at a certain time and you had to record them if you wanted to see them another time'.

The only need for recording I can see when this time comes, would be if you were taking your iPad off line by visiting outer Mongolia where they didn't have WiFi. I am sure in a few years, when TB iPads are common, a similar feature to Safari's Reading List will be available, you will be able to store a streamed movie locally for later viewing. By then I doubt the licensing for local recording will be an issue. In a few years nobody would do it unless they were going to outer Mongolia. By the way, in a few years I believe WiFi will be as ubiquitous as FM radio waves in first world countries.
Edited by digitalclips - 8/21/13 at 5:13am
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post #17 of 18

Maybe, but we are not there yet and right now OTA TV in the UK at least is in large part excellent and free, and people will not adopt something else if it doesn't embrace this. Stop thinking in a US-centric way and recognise there is a much bigger world out there which doesn't necessarily work in the way that you know. Paradigm shifts do happen but not necessarily at the same pace everywhere - it all depends on how redundant and hence ready for overhaul the old model is. If you ignore the old model when it still has legs then it can slow the adoption of the new model. This is a point that is particularly worth taking into account when embracing the old model is a relatively straightforward thing to do and does not undermine or invalidate the new model.
 

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post #18 of 18
Until someone gets sports (which could be a possibility if the rumors of Google and Apple bidding for NFL Sunday Ticket are to believed)...

Or if content providers (i.e. HBO and ESPN) make their content available without having to have a cable subscription...

none of the streaming services are going to be a complete solution.
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