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Iowa high school equips students with 1,425 MacBook Airs in $1.4 million initiative

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Iowa's Ames High School has announced it will provide each student enrolled in 9th through 12th grade with an 11-inch MacBook Air for use during the 2013 school year.

IowaHS-header2.jpg


The program, approved by the Ames Community school board in May, is intended to enable the school to offer more personalized instruction to students. Tim Taylor, superintendent of schools in Ames, said the computers will allow teachers to reduce "one-size-fits all lecture formats and rote instruction in the classroom."

Students and parents are excited about the potential impact of the initiative, but district officials have been quick to caution that the devices themselves are only a tool.

"The magic is in giving students and teachers the tools they need to create, collaborate and communicate," said the district's Director of Technology Services, Karl Hehr.

Students will pay a $25 deposit when checking out the devices, and will not be allowed to modify their software configuration. In the event of damage or loss ? major concerns for 1:1 computing programs ? they will be charged maximum fees of $50 for the first incident and $150 for the second incident. If the event is deemed to be the result of "gross negligence," the students may find themselves liable for the full replacment cost ? more than $1,000.

Iowa State University will also be involved with the program, monitoring its progress and suggesting improvements.

As 1:1 initiatives gain popularity in high schools across the United States, Apple is readying a push to bring iPads - rather than laptops - to classrooms. The company recently revised the iTunes Store's terms and conditions to allow children under the age of 13 to open and manage their own accounts, as long as the Apple ID was requested by an "approved educational institution," making it easier to deploy the tablets in elementary and middle schools.
post #2 of 29

B... b-b-but Windows RT!  For free!

/s

Quality isn't expensive... it's priceless.

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Quality isn't expensive... it's priceless.

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post #3 of 29

Impressive.

post #4 of 29
Caching!!!
post #5 of 29

wow.  wow.  (NB  I was in Ames yesterday... for a coffee break).

 

MBAs.... in HS.   How much you wanna guess iPads will end up in 6-7-8 grade eventually (bookless classes).

 

I do agree, if I'm tasking students to create 5 10 page papers every semesters, I'm gonna hate to read what comes off of an iPad keyboard.  

My curiousity is the classroom ergometrics with laptops vs pads...  

 

It also normalizes the low income kids who don't have parents who invest in home technology.   My guess is ISU is probably measuring that among other things, as well as engaging reluctant teachers to engage students.

 

And how much you think iBooks on Mavericks was a bit of this...

post #6 of 29
I remember when school computers were locked down in a lab.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #7 of 29

Schools equip with iPads haters claim they're useless and should be using laptops instead.

 

Now what will they complain about when a school uses MacBooks? They're too expensive? Should be Windows instead?

Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

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post #8 of 29
Oh, noes! All that money thrown away on Apple's overpriced MBA's. They could have bought 4X as many Chromebooks. Chromebooks are our children's future. It's all about The Cloud. I know for sure that whoever approved the purchase of those Apple products for the BOE own shares in the company. No righteous individual would ever have considered Apple computers.

/s
post #9 of 29

Off topic, but I only just found out and didn't see it anywhere on AI.......

 

Apparently Groklaw is shutting down giving a lame excuse about NSA spying and privacy. I think the real reason is nobody was buying their biased opinions on cases (the Motorola/MS one and FRAND rates comes to mind).

 

How will our resident shills take this news with one of their "sources" shutting down?

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post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

I remember when school computers were locked down in a lab.

 

I remember when the first calculator made it into my school with the bright red LED display (Texas Instruments?) - I was so jealous! How quickly technology has changed!

post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

I remember when school computers were locked down in a lab.

Young pup.

I remember when you couldn't even get to the school computers. Instead, you had to type at keypunch machines and submit your deck to the operator to have your project run - and then wait for the printout on a massive line printer.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Schools equip with iPads haters claim they're useless and should be using laptops instead.

 

Now what will they complain about when a school uses MacBooks? They're too expensive? Should be Windows instead?

The Windows users are getting desperate as are the Android users.  They feel threatened by a better product that prevents their mentality from spreading.  That's all.

 

The Apple haters just want their kids to be just as dumb just like they are.  LOL.

post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdyB View Post

 

I remember when the first calculator made it into my school with the bright red LED display (Texas Instruments?) - I was so jealous! How quickly technology has changed!

my school used a teletype machine that was hooked up to a system at Stanford so we could do math problems when I was in third grade.  We thought THAT was cool.  Then the calculators came out, but I used the HP calculators, those were the most advanced ones back then.  Ah, the Good Ol Days.  I remember when 5.25 inch floppys were single sided, and then they went to double sided,  WHAT A technology leap, then 5MB hard drives came out and people thought their feces came out gift wrapped. Then 10MB hard drives, they were something like $5K for one of those, so anytime someone complains about the price of something, I just laugh.

 

Heck, for the longest time, the average computer would be $5K, then it went down to $3.5K, now it's $1500.

 

I remember when a word processor, spreadsheet app was $400 and thought THAT was outrageous.

 

People need to quit complaining and look at how affordable computers are these days.

post #14 of 29

Kentucky did that a couple of years ago, and on a larger scale. Catch up Iowa!

 

http://www.electronista.com/articles/11/07/27/owensboro.first.to.get.macbook.air.in.schools/

post #15 of 29
Here's hoping they update their wifi network at the same time.
post #16 of 29

Nanny Bloomberg- the NYC school system need these!

 
Where's the new Apple TV?
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Where's the new Apple TV?
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post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

...with one of their "sources" shutting down?

 

You assume they were a real source...  /s

post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdyB View Post

I remember when the first calculator made it into my school with the bright red LED display (Texas Instruments?) - I was so jealous! How quickly technology has changed!

My dad showed me this mechanical analog calculator called a slide rule. It was used during the early Pleistocene era. It's how they built the pyramids. 1smile.gif

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Young pup.

I remember when you couldn't even get to the school computers. Instead, you had to type at keypunch machines and submit your deck to the operator to have your project run - and then wait for the printout on a massive line printer.

Line...printer? Dude, printers use lasers. The early civilizations used the 72dpi ImageWriter.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevt View Post

Here's hoping they update their wifi network at the same time.

Why?  Do you have inside poop on their infrastructure?  

 

No matter what a chrome book would have put more wifi demands on the internal infrastructure, and likely more demands on the Internet Uplink.  That said, everything I read about Ames' infrastructure tells me it's primarily in the cloud.

 

It's interesting that they are more concerned about providing 'student friendly' WIFI outside of school.   And creating iOS and android apps for parents to 'tap into' school infrastructure to 'keep tabs' on their childrens' school progress.  http://amestrib.com/sections/news/ames-and-story-county/ames-district-looks-wifi-partners-putz-won%E2%80%99t-seek-re-election

 

This isn't going away.   Like projectors replacing whiteboards replacing blackboards, paperless classrooms will be the norm.  

 

Quote:
Catch up Iowa!

Err, the race isn't to get technology into the classroom... it's about a better prepared and competent graduate into our society... ..

 

To paraphrase a aphorism:  "It's the Magician, and not the shiny wand, that makes the Magic."

 

In Kentucky's own report*... it ranks 39th in graduation rate, and 7th in technology access (2007), compared to Iowa's 7th in graduation (33rd in Technology ranking).   In one true measure of education, Kentucky is the state that is pressured to 'catch up' ;-)

 

*(http://www.lrc.ky.gov/lrcpubs/rr345.pdf )

 

(disclaimer: Expat Iowegian)

post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Line...printer? Dude, printers use lasers. The early civilizations used the 72dpi ImageWriter.

This was long before the imagewriter came out. You might want to learn a bit about computing history.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


My dad showed me this mechanical analog calculator called a slide rule. It was used during the early Pleistocene era. It's how they built the pyramids. 1smile.gif

 

Your Dad was lucky to have a slide rule.  My dad had stone tablets with all mathematical calculations carved into it by the babylonians to plot the path of the stars in heavens.  And his dad had to approximate long division using sticks and bundles of sticks...

 

(apologies and ob. reference to Monty Python... the mother of all 'we had it toof  in my day' riffs)

 

http://www.davidpbrown.co.uk/jokes/monty-python-four-yorkshiremen.html

Quote:
Michael Palin: Ahh.. Very passable, this, very passable.
 
Graham Chapman: Nothing like a good glass of Chateau de Chassilier wine, ay Gessiah?
 
Terry Gilliam: You're right there Obediah.
 
Eric Idle: Who'd a thought thirty years ago we'd all be sittin' here drinking Chateau de Chassilier wine?
 
MP: Aye. In them days, we'd a' been glad to have the price of a cup o' tea.
 
GC: A cup ' COLD tea.
 
EI: Without milk or sugar.
 
TG: OR tea!
 
MP: In a filthy, cracked cup.
 
EI: We never used to have a cup. We used to have to drink out of a rolled up newspaper.
 
GC: The best WE could manage was to suck on a piece of damp cloth.
 
TG: But you know, we were happy in those days, though we were poor.
 
MP: Aye. BECAUSE we were poor. My old Dad used to say to me, "Money doesn't buy you happiness."
 
EI: 'E was right. I was happier then and I had NOTHIN'. We used to live in this tiiiny old house, with greaaaaat big holes in the roof.
 
GC: House? You were lucky to have a HOUSE! We used to live in one room, all hundred and twenty-six of us, no furniture. Half the floor was missing; we were all huddled together in one corner for fear of FALLING!
 
TG: You were lucky to have a ROOM! *We* used to have to live in a corridor!
 
MP: Ohhhh we used to DREAM of livin' in a corridor! Woulda' been a palace to us. We used to live in an old water tank on a rubbish tip. We got woken up every morning by having a load of rotting fish dumped all over us! House!? Hmph.
 
EI: Well when I say "house" it was only a hole in the ground covered by a piece of tarpolin, but it was a house to US.
 
GC: We were evicted from *our* hole in the ground; we had to go and live in a lake!
 
TG: You were lucky to have a LAKE! There were a hundred and sixty of us living in a small shoebox in the middle of the road.
 
MP: Cardboard box?
 
TG: Aye.
 
MP: You were lucky. We lived for three months in a brown paper bag in a septic tank. We used to have to get up at six o'clock in the morning, clean the bag, eat a crust of stale bread, go to work down mill for fourteen hours a day week in-week out. When we got home, out Dad would thrash us to sleep with his belt!
 
GC: Luxury. We used to have to get out of the lake at three o'clock in the morning, clean the lake, eat a handful of hot gravel, go to work at the mill every day for tuppence a month, come home, and Dad would beat us around the head and neck with a broken bottle, if we were LUCKY!
 
TG: Well we had it tough. We used to have to get up out of the shoebox at twelve o'clock at night, and LICK the road clean with our tongues. We had half a handful of freezing cold gravel, worked twenty-four hours a day at the mill for fourpence every six years, and when we got home, our Dad would slice us in two with a bread knife.
 
EI: Right. I had to get up in the morning at ten o'clock at night, half an hour before I went to bed, (pause for laughter), eat a lump of cold poison, work twenty-nine hours a day down mill, and pay mill owner for permission to come to work, and when we got home, our Dad would kill us, and dance about on our graves singing "Hallelujah."
 
MP: But you try and tell the young people today that... and they won't believe ya'.
 
ALL: Nope, nope.

 

post #23 of 29
Just got a MacBook Air a couple weeks ago an all I can say is these are some lucky kids! I absolutely LOVE the Air and what it can do.
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

Why?  Do you have inside poop on their infrastructure?

No. But the number of people reporting wifi issues with their 2013 MBA s on discussions.apple.com thread 5100655 is worrying. Works fine with latest Airport gear (hence comment).
The Wifi update has not helped the vast majority, although it did solve other issues. Really hope apple get it sorted as it's a brilliant little laptop.
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by PScooter63 View Post

B... b-b-but Windows RT!  For free!

/s

THAT'S what I was thinking... FREE Surface RT, a computer so reviled by coders that hackers don't even write exploits for it.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


This was long before the imagewriter came out. You might want to learn a bit about computing history.

In my day the boss printer was a teletype printer. It could do up to 100 cpm and was tireless. There was a little dodad on the side where you could create a little paper tape of what you wanted it to send, and then when you were ready, you could feed the paper tape into the printer and somewhere else it would print out... it was magical.

 

 

 

These were especially nice if you only wanted to communicate in upper case.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


Line...printer? Dude, printers use lasers. The early civilizations used the 72dpi ImageWriter.

The "line printer" he mentioned was a chain printer that used ink ribbons. Lasers weren't even out of the laboratory back then. 

 

By the time lasers were in printers was about mid '70s. IBM offered the first one. It could go through a ream of paper so fast that if you bypassed the interlock and failed to close the top of the printer, it would fill the top half of the room with paper before gravity could pull the paper to the floor.

 

It was the mid '80s before laser printers were available for the small business and weren't much faster then the old chain printers, but could do various fonts and graphics and do them much sharper and very quietly.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post

my school used a teletype machine that was hooked up to a system at Stanford so we could do math problems when I was in third grade.  We thought THAT was cool.  Then the calculators came out, but I used the HP calculators, those were the most advanced ones back then.  Ah, the Good Ol Days.  I remember when 5.25 inch floppys were single sided, and then they went to double sided,  WHAT A technology leap, then 5MB hard drives came out and people thought their feces came out gift wrapped. Then 10MB hard drives, they were something like $5K for one of those, so anytime someone complains about the price of something, I just laugh.

 

Heck, for the longest time, the average computer would be $5K, then it went down to $3.5K, now it's $1500.

 

I remember when a word processor, spreadsheet app was $400 and thought THAT was outrageous.

 

People need to quit complaining and look at how affordable computers are these days.

 

Thanks for the memories. My first personal computer used 8" floppies. Each held 250K of data. The 10MB Hard disks were really expensive. Here's a ad from back in the day. For the $3398 you did not get an inclosure or a power supply. But most importantly, you still had to buy a controller board. There were really slow access devices, but compared to the alternative they seemed incredibly fast! 

 

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), default quality

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

In my day the boss printer was a teletype printer. It could do up to 100 cpm and was tireless. There was a little dodad on the side where you could create a little paper tape of what you wanted it to send, and then when you were ready, you could feed the paper tape into the printer and somewhere else it would print out... it was magical.

 

 

These were especially nice if you only wanted to communicate in upper case.

 I used the Paper Tape (DECTape) to actually store programs... I used a KSR33 with tape reader to bootstrap my 6502 based robot via an RS232 line, and then upload any handpatched code while we debugged the robot.   This allowed me to boot my robot away from it's RS232 nipple to my RSX system. (the KSR was nominally more portable;-).  EPROM was too expensive to load from, and I didn't want to have a floppy drive (this was before 5 1/4"  8" drives were heavy and power hungry) mounted on the robot.

 

I'm not old as dirt, but I was around when dirt was made.

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