or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer calls it quits, to retire within a year
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer calls it quits, to retire within a year - Page 5

post #161 of 315

In other news, MSFT is up 2 bucks after this announcement...

 

LOL

 

Mr. Elop of Nokia is probably next to go.

post #162 of 315

No… NO! Say it aint so, Ballmer was the highest paid moron in the tech industry, His inept handling of Microsoft was a never ending source of entertainment. Now that he's leaving Microsoft has a chance to come back and that's bad or Apple and all of us who enjoy computing without crashes and headaches.

 

How the richest man in the world trusted this cow of technological stupidity to control MS is beyond me. Oh well at least we have a year of comedy left.

 

             

 

 

 

post #163 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Pages and Numbers are just awful. Keynote alone is decent.

 

Pages does a lot better job when dealing with documents involving pictures and have the features most home users ever need. The issue for enterprises is all the legacy templates and add-ins that even makes a Microsoft Office upgrade troublesome (We spent 1.5 year and a lot of money on our Office 2003 to Office 2010 project because of these). Also if it weren't for these I could replace Word with Wordpad for most of our users and half of them wouldn't even notice. Last, if anyone is delivering a .docx file as final format they are doing it wrong. The .docx and .pages format should only be used for drafts in most cases.

 

I mostly agree on Numbers. Excel is just better but also have the issue with a lot of self developed add-ins and macros not being compatible with newer versions. But again for the home user Numbers does what most needs.

 

Keynote beats PowerPoint any day.

post #164 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post

Fired executives are hired all the time.  Especially if the come from a bigger company.

Yeah, that's the magic of wealthy people in CEO positions. You get fired by being given a pay off you could live the rest of your life on and some other company hires you as if you didn't do anything wrong at all where you were fired. Eternal employment opportunities in corporate America, until you decide you have enough money to die filthy rich, and you "retire" to a life of continuing to use the world and society as your plaything, trying to buy a ticket into heaven by donating to charity and naming libraries after yourself, expecting that it will compensate for all the damage you did to society when you earned your filthy wealth, except it's not really fixing anything you've done (it's just building an ego gratifying "legacy").

Compare to regular people, who get fired for ridiculous manufactured reasons, or pushed out of a career by upper management's cost cutting or other sociopathic behaviors. You can't get even an interview at any new place because you were out of work at all, had lost a job at all, and aren't young enough or cheap enough to be newly hired by any company. You are an unknown anonymous. If you're lucky, you find a wage slave job that isn't barely living wage.

Executives are too expensive, wealthy, and old to worry about not getting the next job (opposite of regular people that can't actually just quit while they're ahead, because they're not).

Screwed up society we have here.
post #165 of 315

Praise jebus.

Which of us is the fisherman and which the trout?

Reply

Which of us is the fisherman and which the trout?

Reply
post #166 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

• 2011 iWork for iPhone/iPad ...

And still not even feature complete to this day!

What features are missing to satisfy most users' needs? I don't mean the pro Desktop Publisher or SpreadSheet Jockey?

Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

... • 2012 iWork for HDTV/AppleTV via AirPlay ...

Totally not fair to include this as a "version" of iWork.

Why? That's the way it's being used in classrooms, family rooms, meeting rooms board rooms...

Quote:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

...  • 2013 iWork for iCloud ...

A beta that is not feature complete with even the "not feature complete" iOS version so far.

It brings the features most users' need to the cloud that is compatible with their desktop, and mobile device apps.

AFAICT, Only a few features are absent from the iCloud Beta and the iDevice apps... Things like Bezier Curves, Categories/Pivot Tables... I don't believe most people use these...

Quote:

Apple still has a HUGE amount of work to do to make iWork a respectable product.

What worries me the most is that they don't seem to see it that way at all. They actually seem to think they are doing okay with this stuff. 1hmm.gif

I agree that Apple has work to do on iWork -- but I don't agree that it is a "HUGE" amount!


I suspect that Steve Jobs lost interest in iWork -- or didn't want to go too far lest he jeopardize the availability of Office on Macs.


But all that changed with the iPad (and a little with the iPhone). Now, users can grab an iPad and go anywhere and be productive -- on the couch, at the beach, at the park, poolside, in the car, in the lunchroom at school or the office, in the OR, on set... And you have office suite apps that are easy to use and good enough for most people.

I think Apple is rethinking iWork... and will rewrite and add features/feature parity as necessary... The WWDC announcement and release of the iCloud beta is a serious indication of that, IMO.

They are taking small, incremental steps -- they don't need another brouhaha the way they handled the FCPX and Maps releases.


I used to think that if MS brought [the 80% most used parts of] Office to the iPad -- they would make a lot of money and give the stamp of approval to the post-pc era. The Surface fiasco proved me wrong.


I think Apple will go balls-out with a 60%-80% [most-used features] iWork solution across the Mac, iDevice and iCloud platforms. I could even see Apple releasing a Windows version.

Edit: Here's an interesting review of the iCloud iWork bets:

http://www.macworld.com/article/2047239/hands-on-iwork-for-icloud-beta-almost-as-good-as-mac-ios-versions.html#tk.rss_all
Edited by Dick Applebaum - 8/23/13 at 12:20pm
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #167 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Rogoff View Post

Scott Forestall - Microsoft CEO?

 

 

LOL.  No.  The man is a project manager.  Not a CEO.

 

Too many problems hiring someone like him.

 

1) People factor. He doesn't work well with others.  He needs to be seen as the only person that "really matters." that is going to conflict with a lot of folks at MS, who will likely not be thrilled with the guy. Especially someone who wants all the credit for success and won't accept blame for the failures.

 

2) Loyalty factor.  Forstall looked out for himself.  not necessarily Apple.  Steve Jobs reigned him in, had his respect, and focused him.  Scott needs someone to do that for him. If he doesn't have someone in authority over him who he respects, he will just do what he wants.  He also doesn't seem to know how to move forward.  His ideas coelesced at the perfect time years ago.  but he didn't have any new ones when it mattered.  And that's exactly what is wrong with Microsoft.  The company needs fresh, selfless vision.  Not some guy who's all hurt over his past mistakes.

 

3) Revenge factor.  never a good motive. leads to catastrophic mistakes. He will be overeager to 'kill apple" and lead to zune 2.0 and surface 2.0. nope...

 

4) Nerd factor.  Mr. Forstall is a nerd.  not the nerd in a good way.  But he looks nerdy, he presents nerdy.  MSFT is getting rid of the old nerd factor with Ballmer.  They don't need to replace it with a younger nerd.  Scott isn't as totally out there as Steve.  but the dude is a total nerd. MS needs a rockstar.  A statesman. A visionary with ideas that matter today with potential for tomorrow.

 

5) The "what's left?" factor.  What contributions can mr. Forstall make to Microsoft? I cannot think of one.  the assett he was to Steve jobs, he was to Steve alone.  Scott was fiercely loyal to one man.  He basically was Steve's enforcer. what Steve wanted done got done.  And Scott was the guy so ensconced in being a kiss-up to Jobs that he didn't care what anyone else thought or felt.  And that actually was an asset - while Jobs was presiding over the company.  Now, he is just a guy with no true vision of his own, stuck in the past, that no one can work with. 

 

That's not to say the man can't eat some humble pie and benefit from it.  Jobs did.  It changed his life and the world.  but as it now stands, Forstall would be a liability as a CEO.  Not a benefit.  And he may just not be wired to be a CEO as it is.  I am sure Microsoft isn't looking to replace Ballmer with Ballmer 2.0. MS needs an upstart mentality infusion.  Someone who brings fresh new inspiration, while being mature enough to avoid "rookie mistakes."

post #168 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ursadorable View Post

Probably the best thing to happen to Microsoft. Perhaps they can get some clarity back in their organization.

What was their original clarity? Copying and buying competitors and throwing money at it until their 300lb gorilla was built and could threaten and coerce the rest of the industry? What a vision.

Every empire has its time. Apple had two. Maybe Microsoft will survive long enough to become a regular company, instead of the domineering bastard it's always been. But I don't think they (or most any other company in the computer industry) has yet comprehended the fact that this stuff has to not just be advertised at the average person, it also has to be functional, reliable, and sensible for the average non-geek person. Apple has done well with this in iOS and all the geeks run around screaming "dumbing down, dumbing down, the sky is falling!!" They so do not get it.

Very well put!

Apple isn't "dumbing-down"... rather they are "raising-up" the accessibility (capability and productivity) of computers to the non-geek!

I started out as a maimframe computer room geek (16 years with IBM) -- I quit to get into the microcomputer (Apple ][) business.
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #169 of 315

So life goes on.

 

It is usually a good thing to get off of a sinking ship before it goes under.

 

The thing is that Microsoft really can't go much lower. It can lose market share, stock value, and such but its products are at rock bottom. All that can be done is to go up from there.

 

Before Vista came out Microsoft was developing and demonstrating some in home theater products and integrated home controls that worked via special entertainment boxes and ones home computer. As much as I hated Microsoft back then I was impressed with what they were developing. They somehow pulled the plug on that system. Maybe they couldn't get it to work or maybe Ballmer killed it. For me to be impressed with something from them really took a lot. At the time it was better than Apple's Air Play and Airport Express combination. Even now Apple's products don't have such integration with home controls for lighting, air conditioning, and home entertainment. Somebody at Microsoft made a huge mistake killing that system.

post #170 of 315


For your dining and dancing pleasure -- See many more at:

http://gizmodo.com/5130531/56-situations-steve-ballmer-probably-hasnt-been-seen-in-before/1188076876
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #171 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post

Fired executives are hired all the time.  Especially if the come from a bigger company.
Still if Steve Jobs didn't pick Forstall to run Apple why would Microsoft make him their CEO? What exactly makes him CEO material?
post #172 of 315

I think Scott Forstall would actually be perfect for the job. lol.gif

 

He'd fit into Microsoft's culture perfectly and is probably the only man in the world who has a genuine motive for taking it on and getting it right (revenge).

post #173 of 315
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post
Still if Steve Jobs didn't pick Forstall to run Apple why would Microsoft make him their CEO?

 

Apple ≠ Microsoft.


What exactly makes him CEO material?

 

WHAT'RE YOU DOING MAN YOU'RE GONNA BLOW THE WHOLE THING DON'T MAKE THEM THINK ABOUT NOT DOING IT.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply
post #174 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9secondko View Post


LOL.  No.  The man is a project manager.  Not a CEO.

Too many problems hiring someone like him.

1) People factor. He doesn't work well with others.  He needs to be seen as the only person that "really matters." that is going to conflict with a lot of folks at MS, who will likely not be thrilled with the guy. Especially someone who wants all the credit for success and won't accept blame for the failures.

2) Loyalty factor.  Forstall looked out for himself.  not necessarily Apple.  Steve Jobs reigned him in, had his respect, and focused him.  Scott needs someone to do that for him. If he doesn't have someone in authority over him who he respects, he will just do what he wants.  He also doesn't seem to know how to move forward.  His ideas coelesced at the perfect time years ago.  but he didn't have any new ones when it mattered.  And that's exactly what is wrong with Microsoft.  The company needs fresh, selfless vision.  Not some guy who's all hurt over his past mistakes.

3) Revenge factor.  never a good motive. leads to catastrophic mistakes. He will be overeager to 'kill apple" and lead to zune 2.0 and surface 2.0. nope...

4) Nerd factor.  Mr. Forstall is a nerd.  not the nerd in a good way.  But he looks nerdy, he presents nerdy.  MSFT is getting rid of the old nerd factor with Ballmer.  They don't need to replace it with a younger nerd.  Scott isn't as totally out there as Steve.  but the dude is a total nerd. MS needs a rockstar.  A statesman. A visionary with ideas that matter today with potential for tomorrow.

5) The "what's left?" factor.  What contributions can mr. Forstall make to Microsoft? I cannot think of one.  the assett he was to Steve jobs, he was to Steve alone.  Scott was fiercely loyal to one man.  He basically was Steve's enforcer. what Steve wanted done got done.  And Scott was the guy so ensconced in being a kiss-up to Jobs that he didn't care what anyone else thought or felt.  And that actually was an asset - while Jobs was presiding over the company.  Now, he is just a guy with no true vision of his own, stuck in the past, that no one can work with. 

That's not to say the man can't eat some humble pie and benefit from it.  Jobs did.  It changed his life and the world.  but as it now stands, Forstall would be a liability as a CEO.  Not a benefit.  And he may just not be wired to be a CEO as it is.  I am sure Microsoft isn't looking to replace Ballmer with Ballmer 2.0. MS needs an upstart mentality infusion.  Someone who brings fresh new inspiration, while being mature enough to avoid "rookie mistakes."
I agree with all this. Also, if Forstall was CEO material then how come the board didn't make him CEO of Apple? I don't doubt Forstall is a brilliant software engineer but I'm not sure that makes him CEO material, especially a company as large as Microsoft.
post #175 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Apple ≠ Microsoft.

WHAT'RE YOU DOING MAN YOU'RE GONNA BLOW THE WHOLE THING DON'T MAKE THEM THINK ABOUT NOT DOING IT.
Dude we need a healthy Microsoft to stop complete Google domination.
post #176 of 315
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post
Dude we need a healthy Microsoft to stop complete Google domination.

 

Of what? Every OS they've made is worse than Windows. They can have their "free" services all they want. I'd much prefer a Google that spent more time making cheap fiber and killing off other ISPs (or forcing them to upgrade their own services) than anything else.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply
post #177 of 315

Ballmer should have been a used car salesman. 

 

post #178 of 315
LOL! This just goes to show you that you must take everything your hear with a grain of salt. I remember this and how the MS zealots just high fived that a-holes' every word. Now look at him.
post #179 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by m0c0s0 View Post

Scott Forstall anyone?

Suddenly No.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #180 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Dude we need a healthy Microsoft to stop complete Google domination.

Bing and Windows Phone ain't cutting it.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #181 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

How is Larry Page not an improvement over Eric Schmidt? 1hmm.gif

Larry Page has no prior experience running a tech company the size of Google.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #182 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

Yeah, that's the magic of wealthy people in CEO positions. You get fired by being given a pay off you could live the rest of your life on and some other company hires you as if you didn't do anything wrong at all where you were fired. Eternal employment opportunities in corporate America, until you decide you have enough money to die filthy rich, and you "retire" to a life of continuing to use the world and society as your plaything, trying to buy a ticket into heaven by donating to charity and naming libraries after yourself, expecting that it will compensate for all the damage you did to society when you earned your filthy wealth, except it's not really fixing anything you've done (it's just building an ego gratifying "legacy").

Compare to regular people, who get fired for ridiculous manufactured reasons, or pushed out of a career by upper management's cost cutting or other sociopathic behaviors. You can't get even an interview at any new place because you were out of work at all, had lost a job at all, and aren't young enough or cheap enough to be newly hired by any company. You are an unknown anonymous. If you're lucky, you find a wage slave job that isn't barely living wage.

Executives are too expensive, wealthy, and old to worry about not getting the next job (opposite of regular people that can't actually just quit while they're ahead, because they're not).

Screwed up society we have here.

If anyone could be CEOs, they would be CEOs. Start a biz, be your own boss.
post #183 of 315
I was going to FCPX edit this to change the name and graphics to fit the situation -- The only source media I have is an old ripped VCR tape... It isn't worth it to buy a remastered DVD... Anyway you'll get the drill!

Bye Bye Ballmer

"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #184 of 315
"This is an emotional and difficult thing for me to do. I take this step in the best interests of the company I love; it is the thing outside of my family and closest friends that matters to me."

That doesn't sound to me like someone who's retiring to be with his family. He was pushed.
post #185 of 315
Originally Posted by GQB View Post
He was pushed.

 

More like tossed.

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply

Originally posted by Relic

...those little naked weirdos are going to get me investigated.
Reply
post #186 of 315

Good for Microsoft. Perhaps now they can put up a better fight against Google (Who are their true competition. Not Apple).

post #187 of 315
Finally! This buffoon shouldn't have been the CEO of a clown show moreover one of the largest corporations in the world. Some of the board members that allowed this to go on for so long should be gently sneaking out the back door to spend more time with their families -- or with Ballmer -- whichever the case may be. Yikes!
post #188 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


What features are missing to satisfy most users' needs? I don't mean the pro Desktop Publisher or SpreadSheet Jockey?
Why? That's the way it's being used in classrooms, family rooms, meeting rooms board rooms...
It brings the features most users' need to the cloud that is compatible with their desktop, and mobile device apps.

AFAICT, Only a few features are absent from the iCloud Beta and the iDevice apps... Things like Bezier Curves, Categories/Pivot Tables... I don't believe most people use these...
I agree that Apple has work to do on iWork -- but I don't agree that it is a "HUGE" amount!


I suspect that Steve Jobs lost interest in iWork -- or didn't want to go too far lest he jeopardize the availability of Office on Macs.


But all that changed with the iPad (and a little with the iPhone). Now, users can grab an iPad and go anywhere and be productive -- on the couch, at the beach, at the park, poolside, in the car, in the lunchroom at school or the office, in the OR, on set... And you have office suite apps that are easy to use and good enough for most people.

I think Apple is rethinking iWork... and will rewrite and add features/feature parity as necessary... The WWDC announcement and release of the iCloud beta is a serious indication of that, IMO.

They are taking small, incremental steps -- they don't need another brouhaha the way they handled the FCPX and Maps releases.


I used to think that if MS brought [the 80% most used parts of] Office to the iPad -- they would make a lot of money and give the stamp of approval to the post-pc era. The Surface fiasco proved me wrong.


I think Apple will go balls-out with a 60%-80% [most-used features] iWork solution across the Mac, iDevice and iCloud platforms. I could even see Apple releasing a Windows version.

Edit: Here's an interesting review of the iCloud iWork bets:

http://www.macworld.com/article/2047239/hands-on-iwork-for-icloud-beta-almost-as-good-as-mac-ios-versions.html#tk.rss_all

 

I'm not going to go point for point it's too much work with the horrible post editing tools here, but you missed my entire point.  

 

1) Pages for iOS is not "feature complete" because it lacks even basic features that are not only present on every Word processor ever made, but also present on the original OS X version of Pages.  In particular, pagination is a relatively new "fix" and hyphenation and ligatures are still missing.  These are very basic features that are still missing from the product. 

 

2) If you don't understand why the ability to project iWork apps is not in fact a "new version" of iWork apps then it's not worth talking about.

 

3) The online iWork beta also lacks a lot of basic features, not just "Bezier Curves" (which you bizarrely mention so much I think you are in love with them).  It doesn't support languages other than American English for example so when you load any English Word processing document into the web app it becomes alive with red squigglies on every single line.  

 

You're so busy defending Apple you're not even being rational.  

post #189 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Oh Bal.... I mean, bummer! One of Apple's safety nets is gone. :-/

Fortunately, he's there for twelve months more. That's a lifetime, in this business.

 

*Maximum* of one year, meaning if they can find someone tomorrow, he's history without delay.

post #190 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


And what does Microsoft have if Apple adds side by side app multitaksking in iOS and makes iWork suite of apps free?

 

... a rapid case of gas and diarrhea for a week? 

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #191 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

What features are missing to satisfy most users' needs? I don't mean the pro Desktop Publisher or SpreadSheet Jockey?

Why? That's the way it's being used in classrooms, family rooms, meeting rooms board rooms...

It brings the features most users' need to the cloud that is compatible with their desktop, and mobile device apps.


AFAICT, Only a few features are absent from the iCloud Beta and the iDevice apps... Things like Bezier Curves, Categories/Pivot Tables... I don't believe most people use these...

I agree that Apple has work to do on iWork -- but I don't agree that it is a "HUGE" amount!



I suspect that Steve Jobs lost interest in iWork -- or didn't want to go too far lest he jeopardize the availability of Office on Macs.



But all that changed with the iPad (and a little with the iPhone). Now, users can grab an iPad and go anywhere and be productive -- on the couch, at the beach, at the park, poolside, in the car, in the lunchroom at school or the office, in the OR, on set... And you have office suite apps that are easy to use and good enough for most people.


I think Apple is rethinking iWork... and will rewrite and add features/feature parity as necessary... The WWDC announcement and release of the iCloud beta is a serious indication of that, IMO.


They are taking small, incremental steps -- they don't need another brouhaha the way they handled the FCPX and Maps releases.



I used to think that if MS brought [the 80% most used parts of] Office to the iPad -- they would make a lot of money and give the stamp of approval to the post-pc era. The Surface fiasco proved me wrong.



I think Apple will go balls-out with a 60%-80% [most-used features] iWork solution across the Mac, iDevice and iCloud platforms. I could even see Apple releasing a Windows version.


Edit: Here's an interesting review of the iCloud iWork bets:

http://www.macworld.com/article/2047239/hands-on-iwork-for-icloud-beta-almost-as-good-as-mac-ios-versions.html#tk.rss_all

I'm not going to go point for point it's too much work with the horrible post editing tools here, but you missed my entire point.  

1) Pages for iOS is not "feature complete" because it lacks even basic features that are not only present on every Word processor ever made, but also present on the original OS X version of Pages.  In particular, pagination is a relatively new "fix" and hyphenation and ligatures are still missing.  These are very basic features that are still missing from the product. 

2) If you don't understand why the ability to project iWork apps is not in fact a "new version" of iWork apps

3) The online iWork beta also lacks a lot of basic features, not just "Bezier Curves" (which you bizarrely mention so much I think you are in love with them).  It doesn't support languages other than American English for example so when you load any English Word processing document into the web app it becomes alive with red squigglies on every single line.  

You're so busy defending Apple you're not even being rational.  

The highlighted points are valid.

I did not say "project" I said "AirPlay" -- and I did not call it a "new version"... it was a feature an update that allows iPad and iPhone (and now Macs) to display iWork documents on another Mac or an HDTV.

I use Bezier Shapes and Curves all the time and in 30 plus years of using word processors have never used ligatures or needed to use hyphenation -- though I've demoed both. Pages is an excellent tool for storyboarding and with it's Bezier feature and masking capability is my go to tool for creating collages... even though I have a specialty app costing several hundred dollars.


We have different use cases and needs -- I respect that.


Based on your posts on the iCloud thread, you appear to be having performance problems * that are frustrating you (and apparently are unique to you).


* Performance problems with beta software -- are some of the issues that that beta testing is supposed to detect.
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #192 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Why is anyone happy about this? Ballmer's the best thing to happen to Microsoft. His replacement might actually be COMPETENT; we don't want that.


Why will that somehow diminish Apple's products?   As an MSFT shareholder I'm hopeful Balmer's successor will be better.   As an AAPL shareholder I have no concerns either.   I need and use products from both companies and hope they both produce better and better products. 

post #193 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyIKeen View Post


Why will that somehow diminish Apple's products?   As an MSFT shareholder I'm hopeful Balmer's successor will be better.   As an AAPL shareholder I have no concerns either.   I need and use products from both companies and hope they both produce better and better products. 

 

I essentially agree with you (except if Microsoft is diminished or eventually disappears, 'them's the breaks'). Strong competitors move things forward. I don't approve of stealing, such as has happened with Google and Samsung, but Microsoft has been a relatively "honorable", if somewhat confused, competitor of late. Competition = good. Stealing = bad.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #194 of 315
"It looks like you are trying to hire a new CEO. Would you like help?"

    
    


from @segphault

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/08/microsoft-needs-a-new-ceo-who-probably-doesnt-exist/?comments=1
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #195 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by TcaT View Post

 

Pages does a lot better job when dealing with documents involving pictures and have the features most home users ever need. The issue for enterprises is all the legacy templates and add-ins that even makes a Microsoft Office upgrade troublesome (We spent 1.5 year and a lot of money on our Office 2003 to Office 2010 project because of these). Also if it weren't for these I could replace Word with Wordpad for most of our users and half of them wouldn't even notice. Last, if anyone is delivering a .docx file as final format they are doing it wrong. The .docx and .pages format should only be used for drafts in most cases.

 

I mostly agree on Numbers. Excel is just better but also have the issue with a lot of self developed add-ins and macros not being compatible with newer versions. But again for the home user Numbers does what most needs.

 

Keynote beats PowerPoint any day.

 

MS Word 1.0 shipped on a single floppy disk. It didn't even have spell check at a time some other word processor software did. Over time it was added onto and became a better and better program. Then it became buggy and still they added on features. 

 

Meanwhile, as MS Word became more like Aldus Pagemaker and Quark Xpress, the latter two developed serious management and update problems, leaving MS Word to a place to root into. There are a few reasonable products that are cross platform that fill the upper-end desk top publishing tier but most of what's left, like iWorks are aimed at the "quick and dirty" document creating/reading segment. For most enterprise customers; they have found that iWorks on the iPad/iPhone is "good enough" for most situations and since they love the iPad, have adapted to the iWorks suite. 

 

What may come of this is that enterprise may drop MS Word from the mix and use a high end product like Xpress, InDesign, or Scribus for press-ready and pdf doc creation and relatively featureless Word Processing software for general communications. In many ways email programs churn out a lot more communications than word processors these days. And they are really pretty basic at formating etc. 

 

What I'm suggesting may be a fork in the road leaving sophisticated desk top publishing programs at the high end and more basic and less costly document creation/reading software for the bulk of the employees. Watch for studies that support this as a time-saving, e.g. cost-saving decision moving forward.

 

The idea of paying Microsoft $99 per year per employee may be an idea who's time has come and gone. iWorks as well as some other software that costs $10 with free upgrades will be too economical to ignore. Especially since enterprise has had several years of success with iPhones and iPads that don't support MS Word. Microsoft's slowness to market with a decent touch-aware OS may have just cost them the MS Office lock-in.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #196 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyIKeen View Post


Why will that somehow diminish Apple's products?   As an MSFT shareholder I'm hopeful Balmer's successor will be better.   

 

I'm sure Ballmer's replacement will be better, after all HP has fired better CEOs that Ballmer.

 

The problem I see is the drifting period while the Board searches and interviews possible candidates, then the period while the new CEO settles in and learms to find his/her office, then begins the slow process of changing the huge organization's culture and structure to become more responsive and inventive. 

 

By then, the landscape of Microsoft's market could have changed 100% again

 

Sadly, market leaders in the technology field have came and gone. In fact, I can only think of two that have plodded on since the 1960s. Every other name is new.

"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
Reply
post #197 of 315

NNNNOOOOOO......! Ballmer could keep MS a second-rate or third-rate player until its death knell. 

post #198 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyIKeen View Post


Why will that somehow diminish Apple's products?   As an MSFT shareholder I'm hopeful Balmer's successor will be better.   As an AAPL shareholder I have no concerns either.   I need and use products from both companies and hope they both produce better and better products. 


I'd guess that Apple's products would get better if there was someone with real vision at Microsoft.

na na na na na...
Reply
na na na na na...
Reply
post #199 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I am retired, but used office for years (since Multiplan). I find that every "Office" thing we need to do is doable with iWork.


I maintain that iWork is easier to learn, to use and more productive for the new and average user -- no digging through layers of bloat.

Ok then, I guess you have looked at the actual product! We just have differing evaluations. I still work full time and there's no realistic alternative to MS Office in the workplace. Universities are different - I did a masters (part time) a few years ago and everyone just used whatever office suite they wanted and the academics didn't care. Perhaps Apple could make inroads there, if enough people share your evaluation (and not mine) of the product.

post #200 of 315
Until they ditch Windows 8 scheme and Metro entirely, they are still hosed.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer calls it quits, to retire within a year