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Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer calls it quits, to retire within a year - Page 7

post #241 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post

Just because IBM has changed its business focus doesn't mean it is a shadow of its former self. Far from it, no matter which really important metric you use. Success is not merely measured by marketshare in the consumer world. 

 

Given that IBM walked away from the PC market a few years before the dawn of the age of tablet (whilst near the top of the heap), the proper perspective is that they were frigging brilliant - one of the most brilliant transitions any large business has ever made. Microsoft has never timed anything so perfectly. Nor has it made such a strategic and successful 90° shift in its history (although Bill Gates would argue IE was one such example).

 

The server must be acting up.

 

Your reply came in a long time (over an hour) after another member who also replied to my comment. That person's post included my complete comment with revisions, whereas yours did not.

 

Originally I was thinking of the IBM era when they had the largest loss on record for any company (at the time), $8 billion.

 

IBM has adapted to the changing environment. Maybe Microsoft can also do this now that Ballmer is leaving.

 

MS was coming very close to the point of no return before the announcement that Ballmer is leaving. The longer he stayed the harder it would be to turn that ship around.


Edited by island hermit - 8/24/13 at 2:13pm
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post #242 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post

 

The interesting question is whether they will hire a business manager (sales or finance person) or a technology guru to run the business. 

There's no tech guru on the loose that would take this job. A tech guru would start up his own business and sell it to MS or Google for way more money than this job would make. He could sell it to Apple but Apple doesn't over pay for things.

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post #243 of 315

Ballmer said he could retire in 2018 after his youngest kid started college, and won't allow his children to use google or Apple products... poor kids. I can't understand how a father wouldn't want the best for his children. Imagine his kid going to college with a Surface, he'd be the laughing-stock on campus.

post #244 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


None of that disproves the statement that iWorks can catch on based on the success of the iPad.

While there are exceptions, iPads are generally used for content consumption more than content creation. And iWorks will read most of those gigabytes or terabytes of files you're talking about. More importantly, the vast majority of those files are not something that would likely be accessed remotely, anyway. If you're at a level in the organization (CFO, perhaps) where you need access to all that data, you're probably not going to be using an iPad for your remote access. iPads will generally be used by sales people, service people, support people, and so on - and they need a much more limited set of those documents. Since iWorks can read Word and Excel and PowerPoint documents, that will be more than sufficient for most people.

Of course, one could argue that if you're simply using iWorks to read and write in Office format that it doesn't have a major impact on the MS Office monopoly, but that's a different argument.

 

I agree with you. Most of the posters who see Office's dominance also ignore how well the iPad has infiltrated the enterprise market. Since it did this without MS Office as an app, enterprise has found a way to cope without it over the last approximate three years. When you factor in the absents of MS in the enterprise phone business the vacuum filled my Apple products has been going on since 2007.

 

If we break down enterprise into Business, Education and Government the future of MS Office is even less secure looking. 

 

in business, the Fortune 500 is MS Office's hold is most secure, while being eroded in the departments with highly mobile employees. In recent high profile court cases the high numbers of iPads being used by reporters in the courtroom was amazing. So, one needs to look at market segments within business to see greater or lesser conversion to iPads. Small business seems to find the iPad more compelling for point of sale/ point of customer interaction but daily I see more ways business is using the iPad to conduct business.

 

In government, specifically the U.S. federal government, a recent contract has completely shut MS out of consideration for the next 6 years. The contract covers phones and tablets. In fact Apple is the ONLY tablet on the schedule. People are learning to do their job without MS Office day after day, and management is adjusting very well as well. 

 

Finally, in education, Microsoft's delay into the tablet market signals the biggest impact their slowness has cost them in today's sales and future use of MS Office. That MS is discounting their tablets below cost, and even giving away thousands to schools is a indication of what MS sees as a major loss of Office users moving forward. This year alone about a million students in high school and college will spend most/all of their time with an iPad in hand, and being taught how to use Pages and Numbers instead of Office. In addition the UI of these programs follow the same UI of the other programs they will be using on the iPad. 

 

When these students move out into the job market they will be iPad experts and prepared for a more mobile employment world that doesn't hold Office as such an important needed skill. 

 

All of this is being played out on a landscape where email has become a much higher form of communication and free of the need for MS Office. in addition, pdf documents are more capable and more document creation is moving to desk-top publishing software to insure that individual employees are not creating liability producing documents. MS Office is finding itself not quite DTP quality and too slow for quick-and-dirty.

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post #245 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

What features are missing to satisfy most users' needs? I don't mean the pro Desktop Publisher or SpreadSheet Jockey?

Why? That's the way it's being used in classrooms, family rooms, meeting rooms board rooms...

It brings the features most users' need to the cloud that is compatible with their desktop, and mobile device apps.


AFAICT, Only a few features are absent from the iCloud Beta and the iDevice apps... Things like Bezier Curves, Categories/Pivot Tables... I don't believe most people use these...

I agree that Apple has work to do on iWork -- but I don't agree that it is a "HUGE" amount!



I suspect that Steve Jobs lost interest in iWork -- or didn't want to go too far lest he jeopardize the availability of Office on Macs.



But all that changed with the iPad (and a little with the iPhone). Now, users can grab an iPad and go anywhere and be productive -- on the couch, at the beach, at the park, poolside, in the car, in the lunchroom at school or the office, in the OR, on set... And you have office suite apps that are easy to use and good enough for most people.


I think Apple is rethinking iWork... and will rewrite and add features/feature parity as necessary... The WWDC announcement and release of the iCloud beta is a serious indication of that, IMO.


They are taking small, incremental steps -- they don't need another brouhaha the way they handled the FCPX and Maps releases.



I used to think that if MS brought [the 80% most used parts of] Office to the iPad -- they would make a lot of money and give the stamp of approval to the post-pc era. The Surface fiasco proved me wrong.



I think Apple will go balls-out with a 60%-80% [most-used features] iWork solution across the Mac, iDevice and iCloud platforms. I could even see Apple releasing a Windows version.


Edit: Here's an interesting review of the iCloud iWork bets:

http://www.macworld.com/article/2047239/hands-on-iwork-for-icloud-beta-almost-as-good-as-mac-ios-versions.html#tk.rss_all

I'm not going to go point for point it's too much work with the horrible post editing tools here, but you missed my entire point.  

1) Pages for iOS is not "feature complete" because it lacks even basic features that are not only present on every Word processor ever made, but also present on the original OS X version of Pages.  In particular, pagination is a relatively new "fix" and hyphenation and ligatures are still missing.  These are very basic features that are still missing from the product. 

2) If you don't understand why the ability to project iWork apps is not in fact a "new version" of iWork apps then it's not worth talking about.

3) The online iWork beta also lacks a lot of basic features, not just "Bezier Curves" (which you bizarrely mention so much I think you are in love with them).  It doesn't support languages other than American English for example so when you load any English Word processing document into the web app it becomes alive with red squigglies on every single line.  

You're so busy defending Apple you're not even being rational.  


For purposes of context, I left your response and my original pose intact, above:


Below, I quote an individual point and my response to it:
Quote:
1) Pages for iOS is not "feature complete" because it lacks even basic features that are not only present on every Word processor ever made, but also present on the original OS X version of Pages.  In particular, pagination is a relatively new "fix" and hyphenation and ligatures are still missing.  These are very basic features that are still missing from the product. 


Clearly, OSX Pages has support for ligatures and hyphenation as shown by its help screens:


  



The support for ligatures varies by font as shown below (Palatino, Zapfino), I drew a line to the right of each font pair so you could gage compression. The image on the left is a document created on Current Pages 4.3 running on OSX 10.9. The one on the right it from an iPad 4 running Pages on iOS 7 (It looks exactly the same on another iPad running iOS 6). You can open, display and copy paste a document with ligatures on iOS -- you just can't create ligatures, yet!


  



Finally, Here is the same document opened in the iCloud Beta Pages app. No ligatures, yet -- but it is a beta:






If you are a typographer or professional desktop publisher, these features are noticeable and, likely, important.


The point I was trying to make is that a large percent of users of word processors do not need these features.


It would be interesting to ask a random cross-section of, say, 100 students, typists, teachers, MS Word users, etc. -- to explain "ligatures" and "auto-hyphenation"! I suspect very few could!



BTW, In my surfing on this topic, I discovered that Word users have to do a bit of gymnastics to use ligatures -- and I didn't even know Pages supported them!




Edit: I dis some more surfing and:

Quote:
3) The online iWork beta also lacks a lot of basic features, not just "Bezier Curves" (which you bizarrely mention so much I think you are in love with them).  It doesn't support languages other than American English for example so when you load any English Word processing document into the web app it becomes alive with red squigglies on every single line.  


You can do an entire OS X Pages document in another language -- or change languages word-by-word, line-by-line, paragraph-by-paragraph... I suspect this capability will find itself in iOS and iCloud Pages.

  
Edited by Dick Applebaum - 8/24/13 at 4:35pm
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post #246 of 315

Eric Schmidt should run Microsoft.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #247 of 315
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post
Eric Schmidt should run Microsoft.

 

Eric Schmidt should be in jail.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #248 of 315
MS has a very solid enterprise server/services business that has grown consistently in recent years and has a strong future. that is the real core of the company. Office is one of those services essentially. so is Windows 7. Ballmer did a good job of moving this ahead, and it is well positioned for the future.

his failure instead was clinging to Gates' 1990's Windows Everywhere mega ambition. which lead to continued futile consumer market initiatives (sorry, the XBox is only a niche product) and finally the misbegotten Windows 8. MS will never succeed as a consumer products company. the era when PC's were a general consumer product has proved to be temporary. the consumer PC is now devolving into another niche market, while post-PC portables dominate the mass market.

so now, Ballmer is taking the fall ... for Gates' failed vision that they shared. and Gates of course made the call to tell Bill it was time to "retire." someone had to carry the can, and it sure wasn't going to be Bill.

and now Gates is going to pick the successor too! do you think anyone Bill does not endorse will get picked by that committee? zero chance.

it's Gates of course that really needs to be fired.

since that will never happen, until he dies MS is going to limp along as now, half a strong success and half a chronic failure.
post #249 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I was planning on getting the minimum storage on my next iPhone... But, if they improve the camera, 128 GB (in between WiFi locations) may not be enough!

By 'in between WiFi' you mean to upload photos? If so, it might make sense to calculate the money spend on unlimited 3G/LTE bandwidth vs minimum <> maximum storage. It may be cheaper to upload/sync your Photostream over cellular using a cheaper model iPhone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

[ ... but Ballmer doesn't want Microsoft to be IBM... or Apple ]
http://news.cnet.com/8301-10805_3-57599909-75/ballmer-microsoft-doesnt-want-to-be-ibm-or-apple/

Thanks for that link. This one popped out:

Q: Your biggest regret?

Ballmer: Oh, you know, I've actually had a chance to make a lot of mistakes, and probably because, you know, people all want to focus in on period A, period B, but I would say probably the thing I regret most is the, what shall I call it, the loopedy-loo that we did that was sort of Longhorn to Vista. I would say that's probably the thing I regret most. And, you know, there are side effects of that when you tie up a big team to do something that doesn't prove out to be as valuable.


Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I've always felt Apple should produce an iWorks Pro to help with one of the things you refer to.

Me too. Except in Enterprise IT they'd want a roadmap. And Apple 'never' gives one, especially looking at the updates on iWork. Sure (looking at your post Dick Appelbaum) they've added features, but it's not a 'full fledged' 'Office Document Generator' for lack of a better term. Then again, the same goes for MS Office. Look at the 'new features' Excel got with Office 2010:


Microsoft Excel 2010 (version 14). Minor enhancements and 64-bit support, including the following:
  • Multi-threading recalculation (MTR) for commonly used functions
  • Improved pivot tables
  • More conditional formatting options
  • Additional image editing capabilities
  • In-cell charts called sparklines
  • Ability to preview before pasting
  • Office 2010 backstage feature for document-related tasks
  • Ability to customize the Ribbon
  • Many new formulas, most highly specialized to improve accuracy

That's not really a new version; that's a lame way to extort money from your subscription customers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rayz View Post

Stop trying to copy Apple's strategy and instead copy Apple's philosophy: Don't be afraid to burn everything you've built in exchange for a better future.


[...]

They are already limiting themselves in order to hang on to a legacy.
Well to be fair, at the time, Apple could afford to burn everything and start over because there were only a handful of people whose careers depended on Macintosh, and, by in large they were not in enterprise. Then look at Windows. 90%+ of the world's businesses, utilities, military, governments, scientific research, banking, and education depend on legacy Windows. When you think back, Microsoft did burn almost everything when they switched from DOS to Windows but the computing install base was much smaller then and they left in the ability to run DOS, much like Apple did with Mac OS classic in OS X. Microsoft has to keep legacy compatibility because so much of the modern world depends on it. To ditch Windows legacy compatibility would be suicide for Microsoft and plunge the business computing world into chaos for years.

In W95 you could still run MS-DOS. Not only just running DOS, DOS applications 8 & 16-bit as well. In fact, I think you could disable the GUI with the flick of a switch in the boot.ini, IIRC.

But that's beside the point you are making, to which I agree. MS really has to support legacy apps. But I think they should have done that the way Apple did with Rosetta. Yeah, the greatest software ever written, that you'll never get to see ...or some similar tagline like that.
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post #250 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

so now, Ballmer is taking the fall ... for Gates' failed vision that they shared. and Gates of course made the call to tell Bill it was time to "retire." someone had to carry the can, and it sure wasn't going to be Bill.

I think you mean Steve B there. And that is not what he says:

Q: Did Chairman Bill Gates ask you to stay or go?

Ballmer: No. Bill -- I mean, no. Bill respects my decision. I mean, it's one of these things when if it's -- you know, ultimately these kinds of things have to be one's own personal decision.

...as far as we can take this as fact.
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post #251 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

MS has a very solid enterprise server/services business that has grown consistently in recent years and has a strong future. that is the real core of the company. Office is one of those services essentially. so is Windows 7. Ballmer did a good job of moving this ahead, and it is well positioned for the future.

his failure instead was clinging to Gates' 1990's Windows Everywhere mega ambition. which lead to continued futile consumer market initiatives (sorry, the XBox is only a niche product) and finally the misbegotten Windows 8. MS will never succeed as a consumer products company. the era when PC's were a general consumer product has proved to be temporary. the consumer PC is now devolving into another niche market, while post-PC portables dominate the mass market.

so now, Ballmer is taking the fall ... for Gates' failed vision that they shared. and Gates of course made the call to tell Bill it was time to "retire." someone had to carry the can, and it sure wasn't going to be Bill.

and now Gates is going to pick the successor too! do you think anyone Bill does not endorse will get picked by that committee? zero chance.

it's Gates of course that really needs to be fired.

since that will never happen, until he dies MS is going to limp along as now, half a strong success and half a chronic failure.

This is a well-reasoned post.

The disruption has happened before... Not too long ago IBM owned 97% of the maimframe computer market with hundreds of thousands of computer installations -- each earning thousands of $ per month.

I remember reading about an event of that era... ConEd was the Electric utility for NYC. They had various branch offices where New Yorkers went to pay their bills. No internet then -- just dumb terminals connected to maimframes over dedicated ATT lines. The story goes that a bunch of customers went to their friendly local ConEd branch, cash in hand, to pay their Electric bills... But the computers/phone lines were down... Delay, lead to delay -- and after several hours of waiting, the angry crowd started a riot... Think about that! Customers were trying to pay ConEd for services rendered -- and ConEd had no way to accept their payment... frustrated, the customers rioted. More thoughts on this later.

In the early 1970s the minis began making inroads -- disrupting the maimframes. but, they, in turn we're disrupted as microcomputers began to take off in 1979...

The IBM PC and MS DOS, then Wintel dominated the scene for the next quarter century.

The next disruption began in 2007... the post-pc era,


Today we have hundreds of millions of people with computers in their pocket -- that they use continuously throughout the day.

Now we have the Internet and users that expect, nay demand, to be connected all the time, anywhere... Everywhere.

What will happen when the net/communication backbone is not available for several hours? Several days?

You won't be able to buy or pay for anything, contact friends, doctors, police... Or play games, listen to music, watch movies. You, and hundreds of millions of others, will have a computer in your pocket that is more powerful than those [temporarily] Impotent ConEd maimframes... And they will be totally useless.

What will you do? What will I do? What will we do? By comparison, the ConEd incident will seem as just a small, somewhat loud, garden party among friends....
Edited by Dick Applebaum - 8/24/13 at 8:59pm
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post #252 of 315
I love reading your recollection of those days sir. Also the way you remember them. Thanks much!
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post #253 of 315

Just out of curiosity, why won't the Ballmer videos in the story play on  my MBP, (blocked plug-in),  but they will play on my iPad? 

post #254 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

What will you do? What will I do? What will we do? By comparison, the ConEd incident will seem as just a small, somewhat loud, garden party among friends....

 

To heck with the internet going down... on - 30° C winter nights I think about the electricity going down for days on end. Screwed.

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post #255 of 315
What a loss for Apple users. We won't have him around to ridicule for his behavior and dumb statements. I wonder who they are going to get. Probably someone boring.
post #256 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Dude we need a healthy Microsoft to stop complete Google domination.

I agree. Google has become a very unhealthy entity with a nasty habit of plastering the world with beta products in order to see which one might stick.

As far as Microsoft goes, everyone likes to take a poke at the top dog. They are not about to disappear from the scene any time soon. They have a range of good products, collect royalties from all the Android pedlars and do a lot of excellent research. Their Windows 8 approach makes a lot of sense in my opinion. It will really take off on the tablet side once Intel has even better power efficient processors.

I don't think MS has much to worry when it comes to iWork which is really quite a half hearted attempt from Apple at making a better MS Works/AppleWorks. There were better products with NeXTStep. In any case Apple has never quite gotten the network right.

One could argue that it is Apple that is sitting on a very thin base, not Microsoft. Phones are things that go in and out of style very quickly. Apple appears to be a phone and tablet company. For some odd reason that makes me nervous.

Anyway, I wish SB well. The generational change is happening. Nothing stops time.

Philip
post #257 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

I think you mean Steve B there. And that is not what he says:

Q: Did Chairman Bill Gates ask you to stay or go?

Ballmer: No. Bill -- I mean, no. Bill respects my decision. I mean, it's one of these things when if it's -- you know, ultimately these kinds of things have to be one's own personal decision.

...as far as we can take this as fact.

you actually don't beleve the "party line" here, do you?
post #258 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

I think you mean Steve B there. And that is not what he says:

Q: Did Chairman Bill Gates ask you to stay or go?

Ballmer: No. Bill -- I mean, no. Bill respects my decision. I mean, it's one of these things when if it's -- you know, ultimately these kinds of things have to be one's own personal decision.

...as far as we can take this as fact.

you actually don't beleve the "party line" here, do you?

Yeah,,,

At that level, the "actual act" never needs take place...

Probably, it went something like this:

Ballmer: "Hey Bill, What's this all about?"

Gates: "The Board and I have been discussing your desire to retire -- with this new direction we're taking, we would like your commitment to stay on up to 12 months until we find a qualified replacement -- to assure an orderly transition to the benefit of Microsoft, our customers and employees and Microsoft shareholders."

Ballmer; "Retire?  12 months?  Replacement?  New direction...  Orderly Transition...  Shareholders...  Er, Ah...  Yes...  My family will understand...  And we will appreciate it if you find a replacement ASAP -- but we also understand the need for an orderly transition... 12 months?   Yes, I will commit to stay on up to 12 months until you find a qualified replacement"

Gates: "The Board and I want to thank you far all you've done for Microsft -- and especially for your continued efforts in this matter!"

Ballmer: "No, Bill...  I want to thank you (and the Board) for the support given me over the years -- and especially for honoring my request to retire -- at your earliest convenience..."
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post #259 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

you actually don't beleve the "party line" here, do you?

The "party line" is full of hot girls who are waiting to talk to interesting guys like me. Fees may apply. 1wink.gif

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #260 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Eric Schmidt should be in jail.

But Microsoft is too slow at copying Apple. Eric Schmidt can help.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #261 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

you actually don't beleve the "party line" here, do you?

No, hence my closing line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

^ post

Brilliant!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

But Microsoft is too slow at copying Apple. Eric Schmidt can help.

Thieves ought to go to jail.
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post #262 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

Maybe they will get Phil Schiller he is a joke anyway!

 

"Phil's a joke" "My ass!"
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post #263 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

Yup.

Microsoft is in no danger and they're still a highly profitable company.

As you said they aren't going anywhere and will remain a pretty large force in the market for decades to come.

Even with their open failures under Ballmer, during this time we've seen their most ingenious product yet. Office 365.

Now Microsoft will have a consistent cash cow that will keep their coffers full every month of the year.

With their strangle hold on corporations already in place I'm surprised no one else at Redmond thought of a subscription service model until now.

Microsofts profits are sure to go up with every corporation and government moving to the subscription based 365 service, so we'll see Microsoft around at least as a corporate player for decades to come.

But 365 will be good for iOS as well. Microsoft is bring 365 support to iOS devices so people no longer need to clamor for Microsoft to make a native office app.

IMO 365 for iOS also relegates iWork on iCloud to a consumer niche and not a business tool

Too many people build opinion on Ballmer based on his clowning around, stage antics and such.

Ballmer did quite a lot on top of Microsoft, or if you prefer - Microsoft did quite a lot under Ballmer. I came across this article while googling for next MS CEO:

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/08/microsoft-needs-a-new-ceo-who-probably-doesnt-exist/

Again - he did his share of mistakes, but Microsoft today is more dynamic, more versatile, less afraid to try something new than they were under last years of Gates' leadership.

Was he not not chubby, bald and keen on jumping around the stage, I'm pretty sure he would be considered much more competent CEO than he is now.
post #264 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobborries View Post

Ballmer said he could retire in 2018 
after his youngest kid started college
, and won't allow his children to use google or Apple products... poor kids. I can't understand how a father wouldn't want the best for his children. Imagine his kid going to college with a Surface, he'd be the laughing-stock on campus.

I suspect they are the ones that really went to the board and begged for them to fire him … 1biggrin.gif
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post #265 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post

Too many people build opinion on Ballmer based on his clowning around, stage antics and such.

Ballmer did quite a lot on top of Microsoft, or if you prefer - Microsoft did quite a lot under Ballmer. I came across this article while googling for next MS CEO:

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/08/microsoft-needs-a-new-ceo-who-probably-doesnt-exist/

Again - he did his share of mistakes, but Microsoft today is more dynamic, more versatile, less afraid to try something new than they were under last years of Gates' leadership.

Was he not not chubby, bald and keen on jumping around the stage, I'm pretty sure he would be considered much more competent CEO than he is now.

You keep plugging away on his behalf. Hats off to you sir, I imagine you take in stray cats and dogs too. 1wink.gif
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post #266 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvfox View Post

Maybe they will get Phil Schiller he is a joke anyway!

 

They'd be so lucky! In your dreams. Phil is part of the bedrock of Apple, the most successful company on this planet … you think he's a joke? People laugh at Ballmer because he deserves laughing at not because he is laughable to look at, that's just a bonus.
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post #267 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

None of that disproves the statement that iWorks can catch on based on the success of the iPad.

While there are exceptions, iPads are generally used for content consumption more than content creation. And iWorks will read most of those gigabytes or terabytes of files you're talking about. More importantly, the vast majority of those files are not something that would likely be accessed remotely, anyway. If you're at a level in the organization (CFO, perhaps) where you need access to all that data, you're probably not going to be using an iPad for your remote access. iPads will generally be used by sales people, service people, support people, and so on - and they need a much more limited set of those documents. Since iWorks can read Word and Excel and PowerPoint documents, that will be more than sufficient for most people.

Of course, one could argue that if you're simply using iWorks to read and write in Office format that it doesn't have a major impact on the MS Office monopoly, but that's a different argument.

I see opinion, not statement.

Of course, my "statement" is also just an opinion... based on my work experience. I do work for IT support company and we do have various tablets among our customers. First couple of tablets that were commissioned for salesforce among our customers were Lenovo ThinkPad Tablets 2, x86 tablets with Windows 8 Pro. Sure we have more iPads, but most if not all of them are among customers' executives, and are used for what I mentioned - email, calendar, communications.

This is logical to me. Most our mid to large size (relative to NZ standards) customers with sales teams use SharePoint for sales and other documentation. Sure they can copy files locally, but it is always a bonus if you can access files from your corporate network - you cannot always be prepared for anything.

Ideal remote access setup for our customers consists of multi-layered security elements. there are variations, but we try to enforce most secure one, and usually customers agree. Requirements are:

Proper firewall. We do SonicWALL firewalls, bigger customers are encouraged to invest in Aventail SRA appliances, smaller use SSL-VPN features in firewalls.

Domain logon with password requirements (number of characters, mix of lower case/upper case/numbers/special characters with periodical changes

So far, so good.

Device is part of domain. This is where problem starts for non-Windows devices. We recommend customers that, beside correct credentials, users should be able to get full access to corporate network only from devices which are joined to the domain and have required group policies enabled, as well as management agent installed (in our case, Kaseya). This is so that we can easy remote and try to solve problem, should user call us from business trip from somewhere far away with a problem.

Additional level of authentication. Until recently those were Safeword tokens. They are quite expensive and complex, thus easy to break. We had requests for cheaper, more reliable solutions, thus we looked around and decided on Yubico tokens. Those are practically indestructible, but have one "flaw"; they require full-size USB port to plug in and generate passkey. This could be possible on iPads and Androids with USB dongle... or not. Not sure if those tablets would accept token as USB keyboard, because this is how token basically behaves. But even if they do, there is a problem of joining tablets to domain.

And then, of course, level of iOS/Android Office suites compatibility. Our customers on occasion have complex Excel sheets loaded with formulas and what not. Partial compatibility is not good enough. If there is no other option, they will go for it. But given tablets that can be as portable as iPads and as compatible as Windows PCs, with all the previous security requirements (set in the days when laptop was THE portable device) applicable, it really isn't hard for them to decide.

Selling hardware is not our bread & butter, so we don't have interest (from that angle) to push any specific device. We will configure VPN to cater for different platforms and will explain our customers what are ups and downs of having multiple solutions - setup and maintenance price, complexity, security impact etc. Our experience is that customers will look at simplest solution, which is one standard and, ideally, one that they already have configured.

Granted we have more iPads (maybe even Androids) than Windows tablets among our customers at present, but then suitable Windows tablets have started appearing here in NZ only beginning of 2013.

So that is our experience, and I think logic behind it is reasonably strong. Again, I'm not saying that other solutions can not be applied, but thinking on common focus of most corporate users, they simply don't work as well, at best.

Home users, completely different story.
post #268 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Yeah,,,

At that level, the "actual act" never needs take place...

Probably, it went something like this:

Ballmer: "Hey Bill, What's this all about?"

Gates: "The Board and I have been discussing your desire to retire -- with this new direction we're taking, we would like your commitment to stay on up to 12 months until we find a qualified replacement -- to assure an orderly transition to the benefit of Microsoft, our customers and employees and Microsoft shareholders."

Ballmer; "Retire?  12 months?  Replacement?  New direction...  Orderly Transition...  Shareholders...  Er, Ah...  Yes...  My family will understand...  And we will appreciate it if you find a replacement ASAP -- but we also understand the need for an orderly transition... 12 months?   Yes, I will commit to stay on up to 12 months until you find a qualified replacement"

Gates: "The Board and I want to thank you far all you've done for Microsft -- and especially for your continued efforts in this matter!"

Ballmer: "No, Bill...  I want to thank you (and the Board) for the support given me over the years -- and especially for honoring my request to retire -- at your earliest convenience..."

Come on admit it … you bugged the meeting … 1wink.gif

Seriously I can imagine you are 100% correct … give or take. I doubt he jumped on the table and ranted although I hope they do that when they make the movie. 1biggrin.gif
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post #269 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

You are 100% correct. Poor Microsoft had little choice though. There entire history relied upon using Apple as their R&D department, right up until OS X and iOS and they were simply left outside in the rain after that.

LOL. OK. Send me a copy of that history you were reading, please - I could use some silly right now 1wink.gif
post #270 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

"What people" would that be?

I read through this entire thing and I didn't see anyone refusing to accept that Microsoft cannot go down (for lack of a better term).

I give the board much more credit than that.

Microsoft will be around for a long time. Without a proper mobile strategy, though, in 10 years they will be 2/3 of what they are today and 1/2 in 20 years... maybe less.

People who keep repeating that Microsoft is doomed. Quite a few around here.

Re their mobile strategy - they are late, but they do have good foundations in their existing (corporate-oriented) ecosystem. Really much deeper than iTunes/idevices one. True they could fail to monetize on that, but... it is not realistic to expect.

I think Google is aware of that perfectly well, thus their hostility toward Windows Phone 8 (and tablets outside of classic desktop).
post #271 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I hate to disagree with such a well written and argued post but I think you vastly over estimate Microsofts staying power as well as, and probably more importantly, the speed things can change. It was seemingly only months ago (in fact years now) folks were arguing on this very forum about Apple entering the phone market … tectonic shifts have occurred since. They can occur any time and do so more often these days, especially in technology.

Entire countries can undergo vast changes in what seems like the blink of an eye, look at Germany in 1930's or Russia before that and more recently, South Africa, Eastern Europe and so on … the world economy can be tanked by one country's political decisions, just check out America 2001 - 2009.

To believe one company is somehow so solid, even without taking into account its drastic demise in so many ways over the last decade, is 'head in the sand' thinking. Microsoft can become TWA, Pan Am or Kodak faster than you can say Vista or Zune and it will, my guess 10 years or so.

p.s. I was a Nikon guy, now solidly Canon … no wonder we disagree … 1wink.gif

I'm not a Nikon guy. My user name comes from first letters from my given and family name, and I mixed it back in mid '90 when only camera in my hands was Canon Prima Twin.

I have Nikon camera nowadays, but also a Sony and two Panasonics. I'm really trying to purchase what I think will work best for me, brand loyalty is in distant 2nd place.

Thus I have Windows desktop and laptop, but also an iPhone. I got Android tablet as a gift and am using it as it does the job for me, but regardless I have purchased two iPads for my mother in the last 3 years. While I'm willing to try Windows Phone 8 for my next phone, I'm also encouraging my wife to remain with Apple and grab new iPhone for herself. Best solution for each specific scenario.

I also work in IT since late '80. I have closely followed MS from DOS days. I have passionately supported alternatives, primarily Amiga platform but also Mac and ST. My opinion on MS is not based on my liking of them or not - frankly I'm quite neutral toward all of players in this game, I consider them all equally "evil", greedy on average, though different ones will spike in different periods - but on my exposure to Microsoft's strengths and weakness. Can surprises happen? Sure. But if I'd have to bet who among "big 3" - MS, Apple, Google - is likely to go down first, I doubt MS would be my first choice. Foundations that company sits on are just too strong. Granted, extra work on that foundation could go down much easier, but Microsoft's core is all but indestructible. Consumers can go from one platform to another easy, Platforms can be taken down by lawsuits, economic crisis can turn successful giant into niche brand ... but for Microsoft's legacy compliance and requirement for it among corporations and governments, you'd really need at least an average size Armageddon to take that tower down.

Could I be wrong? Sure. But I doubt it.
post #272 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post

I'm not a Nikon guy. My user name comes from first letters from my given and family name, and I mixed it back in mid '90 when only camera in my hands was Canon Prima Twin.

I have Nikon camera nowadays, but also a Sony and two Panasonics. I'm really trying to purchase what I think will work best for me, brand loyalty is in distant 2nd place.

Thus I have Windows desktop and laptop, but also an iPhone. I got Android tablet as a gift and am using it as it does the job for me, but regardless I have purchased two iPads for my mother in the last 3 years. While I'm willing to try Windows Phone 8 for my next phone, I'm also encouraging my wife to remain with Apple and grab new iPhone for herself. Best solution for each specific scenario.

I also work in IT since late '80. I have closely followed MS from DOS days. I have passionately supported alternatives, primarily Amiga platform but also Mac and ST. My opinion on MS is not based on my liking of them or not - frankly I'm quite neutral toward all of players in this game, I consider them all equally "evil", greedy on average, though different ones will spike in different periods - but on my exposure to Microsoft's strengths and weakness. Can surprises happen? Sure. But if I'd have to bet who among "big 3" - MS, Apple, Google - is likely to go down first, I doubt MS would be my first choice. Foundations that company sits on are just too strong. Granted, extra work on that foundation could go down much easier, but Microsoft's core is all but indestructible. Consumers can go from one platform to another easy, Platforms can be taken down by lawsuits, economic crisis can turn successful giant into niche brand ... but for Microsoft's legacy compliance and requirement for it among corporations and governments, you'd really need at least an average size Armageddon to take that tower down.

Could I be wrong? Sure. But I doubt it.

Interesting analysis and it seems to even echo some of the more grounded tech press.

Of the big 3 tech companies MS, Google, and Apple many believe Apple to be the weakest link.

Although I don't personally agree their reasoning and yours as well makes sense.

MS has a strong enterprise presence and don't stand a chance at being replaced there.

Google's bread and butter is search and in that they don't stand a chance at being replaced. Android, Chrome, and all of their other initiatives make them no money and they could survive and thrive without them. Of course Google's biggest challenge would be Baidu.com, but even without China, Google is pretty set regardless of Glass or there other initiates taking off. Of course what the tech press doesn't take into account is if consumers and businesses change their behavior and no longer rely on Google for search. But it seems no one considers that possibility.

Apple on the other hand is fueled by consumers of whom are fickle. Apple's growth and success comes from having the latest must have product and without that they have less stability than MS or Google in the mind of the tech press. And of course people think Apple's ecosystem is replaceable with Amazon's or even Google's but that's still far from true. Apple has proven over the past decades that they are more than just a flash in the pan fad as well.

Anyway, I don't agree with the pundits that write Apple off, but I can at least understand why they would feel that Apple is in a weaker position than even MS.
post #273 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

Yup.

Microsoft is in no danger and they're still a highly profitable company.

As you said they aren't going anywhere and will remain a pretty large force in the market for decades to come.

Even with their open failures under Ballmer, during this time we've seen their most ingenious product yet. Office 365.

Now Microsoft will have a consistent cash cow that will keep their coffers full every month of the year.

With their strangle hold on corporations already in place I'm surprised no one else at Redmond thought of a subscription service model until now.

Microsofts profits are sure to go up with every corporation and government moving to the subscription based 365 service, so we'll see Microsoft around at least as a corporate player for decades to come.

But 365 will be good for iOS as well. Microsoft is bring 365 support to iOS devices so people no longer need to clamor for Microsoft to make a native office app.

IMO 365 for iOS also relegates iWork on iCloud to a consumer niche and not a business tool


We have been Microsoft-free for years now (slange) -- so I must rely on others' hands-on experiences. Not knowing what Office 365 comprises, I surfed for some reviews. I found a 4.5 star review at PCWorld:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2383731,00.asp



But that didn't give much detail -- then I found:




http://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Office-Premium-Subscription-Download/product-reviews/B00B1TEIRU


There are some real horror stories here if you read the individual reviews...


Apparently, Office 365 is the same-old-same-old bloated Office 2013 (on Windows) and Office 2011 (on the Mac). But it has been repackaged with cloud storage and is installable on up to 5 devices * for an annual subscription of $99.

* Somewhere I read (can't find a link) that the T&C of using Office 365 on 5 devices is that none of the devices can be use for business or business-like (non-profit) activities.

Based on the sub-thread about iWorks beta on iCloud, I was particularly interested in the online Office 365 apps running from a browser... In particular, their feature set, file compatibility and performance. I couldn't find any reviews, articles or tutorials -- and get the impression that the "cloud" part of Office 365 is just used for storing and synching files accessible from PCs, Macs and a the few Surface tablets in use.

What am I missing?
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post #274 of 315

Apologies if this has already been highlighted. 

 

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9241867/Ballmer_forced_out_after_900M_Surface_RT_debacle

 

Ballmer forced out after $900M Surface RT debacle

 

Steve Ballmer was forced out of his CEO chair by Microsoft's board of directors, who hit the roof when the company took a $900 million write-off to account for an oversupply of the firm's struggling Surface RT tablet, an analyst argued today.

 

"He was definitely pushed out by the board," said Patrick Moorhead, principal analyst with Moor Insights & Strategy, in an interview Friday. "They either drove him out, or put him in a situation where he felt he had to leave to save face."

 

The biggest clue that Ballmer was pushed and didn't leave of his own free will was the 12-month timetable Microsoft said it would use to find a CEO successor. "Typically, a board will be working behind the scenes for a replacement, but they've given themselves 12 months," said Moorhead. "I think this went down very quickly."

 

post #275 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post

LOL. OK. Send me a copy of that history you were reading, please - I could use some silly right now 1wink.gif

Oh, you haven't been following DED's features then? 1smile.gif

By the way, my camera choice isn't about 'brand loyalty' … as with my computer choices, it's about quality, performance and how they empower me to do my thing … hence Canon for DSLRs (got to love those L lenses!) , and Apple for computing and Sony for HD pro video cameras and I am seriously thinking Tesla for next car … Obviously all just my personal opinions in all cases but also based on 35+ years in the tech field mainly as a CEO of various tech based companies in UK and USA. Now semi retired and playing with most of these things 1smile.gif

edit I had to add the + to 35 1frown.gif
Edited by digitalclips - 8/25/13 at 8:50am
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post #276 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


[/COLOR][/I][/B]

We have been Microsoft-free for years now (slange) -- so I must rely on others' hands-on experiences. Not knowing what Office 365 comprises, I surfed for some reviews. I found a 4.5 star review at PCWorld:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2383731,00.asp



But that didn't give much detail -- then I found:




http://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Office-Premium-Subscription-Download/product-reviews/B00B1TEIRU


There are some real horror stories here if you read the individual reviews...


Apparently, Office 365 is the same-old-same-old bloated Office 2013 (on Windows) and Office 2011 (on the Mac). But it has been repackaged with cloud storage and is installable on up to 5 devices * for an annual subscription of $99.

* Somewhere I read (can't find a link) that the T&C of using Office 365 on 5 devices is that none of the devices can be use for business or business-like (non-profit) activities.

Based on the sub-thread about iWorks beta on iCloud, I was particularly interested in the online Office 365 apps running from a browser... In particular, their feature set, file compatibility and performance. I couldn't find any reviews, articles or tutorials -- and get the impression that the "cloud" part of Office 365 is just used for storing and synching files accessible from PCs, Macs and a the few Surface tablets in use.

What am I missing?

 

You're not missing anything I don't think and the low reviews don't surprise me.

 

Microsoft did not have consumer's best interest in mind when they moved to Office 365. 

 

Most people that I knew that would use Office would only upgrade once every 5 or more years anyway, so what Microsoft is trying to do is get more money from these people that probably wouldn't be upgrading anyway.

 

Well on the consumer side this is going to fail woefully, and most people will probably shun Office 365 unless it is given to them by their employer for at home use.

 

Where 365 is going to do well for Microsoft is businesses. Businesses already have to deal with renewing licenses with Microsoft and now MS is going to make it more straight forward. They're giving businesses the ease of paying $99 per employee per year for the full Office suite plus new cloud storage solutions.

 

It's a win for Microsoft because they'll be collecting more money from businesses than before, and it's a win for businesses in the small sense that it simplifies the licensing process and gives employees access to some files via the cloud at home.

 

But all that to say for the consumer space I'm starting to think Office Suites and the like may be dying. People are probably content with putting together quick docs on Google or other free alternatives. Steve was right that the idea of documents and even a file system are all dying and will soon be dinosaur concepts. But regardless this won't affect Microsoft's bread and butter in the enterprise which won't be leaving Office anytime in the near future.

post #277 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

You're not missing anything I don't think and the low reviews don't surprise me.

Microsoft did not have consumer's best interest in mind when they moved to Office 365. 

Most people that I knew that would use Office would only upgrade once every 5 or more years anyway, so what Microsoft is trying to do is get more money from these people that probably wouldn't be upgrading anyway.

Well on the consumer side this is going to fail woefully, and most people will probably shun Office 365 unless it is given to them by their employer for at home use.

Where 365 is going to do well for Microsoft is businesses. Businesses already have to deal with renewing licenses with Microsoft and now MS is going to make it more straight forward. They're giving businesses the ease of paying $99 per employee per year for the full Office suite plus new cloud storage solutions.

It's a win for Microsoft because they'll be collecting more money from businesses than before, and it's a win for businesses in the small sense that it simplifies the licensing process and gives employees access to some files via the cloud at home.

But all that to say for the consumer space I'm starting to think Office Suites and the like may be dying. People are probably content with putting together quick docs on Google or other free alternatives. Steve was right that the idea of documents and even a file system are all dying and will soon be dinosaur concepts. But regardless this won't affect Microsoft's bread and butter in the enterprise which won't be leaving Office anytime in the near future.

Agreed. I went Microsoft free a few years back other than Netflix requiring SilverLight but I'm one guy these days. Many Corporates and especially their IT departments will hang on for grim death to what they know. It is one of IT's last islands to make a stand on for control. The answer to this, I think, is giving them a way out. The Mac itself and more so iOS devices have seen a huge increase in acceptance by these bastions of self interest and Office is about all many still cling to. If Apple were to seriously look at a Pro version of iWorks, even if it means very few sales in their core market, it may be a trojan horse and a life boat to IT as Windows sinks slowly in the west. I wonder if Apple could get a jump start by adopting one of the better open source Office Suites and licensing it and developing it to be genuinely OS X and iOS.

What cracks me up in this and many threads are those folks posting and citing 'many years in IT' as a basis for their 'expert', pro Microsoft opinions! Ha!
Edited by digitalclips - 8/25/13 at 8:46am
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post #278 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


Agreed. I went Microsoft free a few years back other than Netflix requiring SilverLight but I'm one guy these days. Many Corporates and especially their IT departments will hang on for grim death to what they know. It is one of IT's last islands to make a stand on for control. The answer to this, I think, is giving them a way out. The Mac itself and more so iOS devices have seen a huge increase in acceptance by these bastions of self interest and Office is about all many still cling to. If Apple were to seriously look at a Pro version of iWorks, even if it means very few sales in their core market, it may be a trojan horse and a life boat to IT as Windows sinks slowly in the west. I wonder if Apple could get a jump start by adopting one of the better open source Office Suites and licensing it and developing it to be genuinely OS X and iOS.

What cracks me up in this and many threads are those folks posting and citing many years in IT as a basis for their expert opinions! Ha!

 

I'm kinda on the fence with an idea like this.

 

Apple doesn't really need to do this and it probably goes against Tim's laser focus, but at the same time there is such a HUGE opportunity here.

 

Let's say Apple were to get more serious on the consumer side with iWork. With the massive hole MS is leaving open with consumers, Apple has the opportunity to make iWork the consumer friendly affordable alternative to Office 365. iWork could be like the Office many home users knew and loved before MS replaced it with expensive 365 subscriptions.

 

At that point if consumers move to iWork en-masse they are going to force the IT departments at there jobs to make strides to support iWork. That's what happened with the iPhone and iPad. Consumers bought them and loved them, then IT departments were forced to adjust. Anyway once the shift happens toward iWork then it'll be time for iWork X, X Serve, OS X Server, and all to come back to ride the wave of Apple in enterprise.

 

Could be a pipe dream, but its one of the open doors that Apple has the risk of losing to Google. Google seems to be pursuing this same thing with Google Drive and Google Business Solutions. 

post #279 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Apologies if this has already been highlighted. 

 

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9241867/Ballmer_forced_out_after_900M_Surface_RT_debacle

 

You have to wonder if Microsoft's board will allow the next person to tinker, which is basically what Ballmer was doing with the Surface effort.

 

Microsoft needs a mobile strategy but how gun shy is that company after this fiasco. Will the next person be allowed to pursue a hardware strategy or will MS go back to its core and provide only a software strategy. Either way it's really risky.

 

I think Microsoft is in deep deep doodoo.

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post #280 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Agreed. I went Microsoft free a few years back other than Netflix requiring SilverLight but I'm one guy these days. Many Corporates and especially their IT departments will hang on for grim death to what they know. It is one of IT's last islands to make a stand on for control. The answer to this, I think, is giving them a way out. The Mac itself and more so iOS devices have seen a huge increase in acceptance by these bastions of self interest and Office is about all many still cling to. If Apple were to seriously look at a Pro version of iWorks, even if it means very few sales in their core market, it may be a trojan horse and a life boat to IT as Windows sinks slowly in the west. I wonder if Apple could get a jump start by adopting one of the better open source Office Suites and licensing it and developing it to be genuinely OS X and iOS.


What cracks me up in this and many threads are those folks posting and citing many years in IT as a basis for their expert opinions! Ha!

I'm kinda on the fence with an idea like this.

Apple doesn't really need to do this and it probably goes against Tim's laser focus, but at the same time there is such a HUGE opportunity here.

Let's say Apple were to get more serious on the consumer side with iWork. With the massive hole MS is leaving open with consumers, Apple has the opportunity to make iWork the consumer friendly affordable alternative to Office 365. iWork could be like the Office many home users knew and loved before MS replaced it with expensive 365 subscriptions.

At that point if consumers move to iWork en-masse they are going to force the IT departments at there jobs to make strides to support iWork. That's what happened with the iPhone and iPad. Consumers bought them and loved them, then IT departments were forced to adjust. Anyway once the shift happens toward iWork then it'll be time for iWork X, X Serve, OS X Server, and all to come back to ride the wave of Apple in enterprise.

Could be a pipe dream, but its one of the open doors that Apple has the risk of losing to Google. Google seems to be pursuing this same thing with Google Drive and Google Business Solutions. 

I am totally out of touch in this, as I've been retired since 1989.

What does a typical enterprise employee do with MS Office apps -- not talking about the specialist spreadsheet jockeys, or the pro desktop publishing uses... rather the other employees...

What do they do with Word?

What do they do with Excel?

Do they use PowerPoint, Access and the other Office apps at all?


I have never used Google Docs -- but I understand it's adequate and free (if a little awkward). Is that enough to satisfy the needs of most employees in the workplace?

If so, iWorks iCloud is said to be better than Google Docs -- If Apple were to make iCloud iWorks free, and maybe a less-inexpensive iWorks (say ($9.99 per app) for the desktop (including Windows). Wouldn't that be a competitive offering?


Since this thread and the other iWorks thread on AI, I have been experimenting with using Pages on a Mac, Several iPads and through Safari on iCloud. Document management takes a little getting used to -- but the synching of documents is fantastic! I used to email stuff (images, urls, drafts, etc.) to myself to get it between devices. Now, with Pages I created a document called Clipboard... I Paste something into it -- and Bam it's on all my devices. Doesn't work for Videos (yet) but that is understandable.

In some ways it is better than dropbox, as you work with file within the context of an app. You can't share to other systems like Vimeo, YT -- but I expect that would be easy to add.
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"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
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