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Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer calls it quits, to retire within a year - Page 3

post #81 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


Not if you go by the comments from both Ballmer and the Microsoft Board. They both claim Microsoft is transitioning to a devices and services company, and they've only just started.


I remember when MS made the mistake of ignoring the internet and then Gates finally woke up and went after Netscape, killing it in very short order.

 

It's not going to be that easy this time. Damn near impossible, I'd say.

 

Windows is a dead end road if it can't be morphed into a mobile platform.

 

Microsoft is in big trouble. It might not look like it today... but looking out to the horizon, it must be looking rather dim for anyone with a vision at MS.

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post #82 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Thanks for ruining the weekend Baller ¡

Ok, I decided to not let this ruin my weekend, so I made a nice collage of him. Here it is in digital form, but I can't respond to any comments as I'm off to the print shop so I can hang it on a wall, somewhere nice, maybe replace a mirror or something. Just so I won't forget. Yeah Baller, we won't ever forget.


Did you use "Pages" for the collage"
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post #83 of 315
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Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


What are you talking about? Microsoft is the 3rd or 4th most valuable company in the world. They basically own the enterprise. Microsoft is FAR from being run in to the ground.

 

They tend to be showing signs of the Dino ! Waiting to become the old and being taken out of those Elite league of Companies the worlds known.

They wont go out of business for sure, coz they have diversified in many areas. So that's not going to happen.

post #84 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

I see that as a mistake. Trying to mimick the Apple model won't work. We've already seen with the write down of Surface inventory that the public isn't clamoring for Microsoft devices.

Ok, so what will work?
post #85 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

“The board is committed to the effective transformation of Microsoft to a successful devices and services company,” (MS Director) Thompson said.

Not really sure what that means. I'm guessing that the Surface was simply a first effort and MS is committing to a lot more Microsoft-produced and sold hardware, and by extension less reliance on licensed OS manufacturers?

 

I think this means more ... "We are now going to start stealing from Google instead of Apple."  

 

Microsoft's strengths are enterprise computing and cloud.  When a CEO is fired by the board and they are looking at putting a board member in his place, generally they are talking about a re-think, and a re-organisation of everything they do on a strictly business basis.  To me this seems to mean that XBox will be gone, and trying to compete with Apple in the consumer sphere will also be gone.  

 

Think of a Microsoft laptop (which is really what Surface is let's face it), that competes with a Chromebook and runs all Microsoft services.  

 

I think they actually have a pretty good shot at this because Google is still currently too busy trying to be Apple, and hasn't yet realised that Android is a boat anchor and Chrome is the more likely future for them. 

post #86 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jessi View Post

Terrible news. Nothing better for Apple than Ballmer at the helm.

On the other hand, given the culture at Microsoft (I worked there in the past) we can be assured that if they hire from within, we're guaranteed to get someone worse for the company. (and thus good for Apple.)

On the other hand, maybe they'll hire Scott Forstall!

 

Scott's not an option. That would tarnish Microsoft's image.. We get a CEO that was fired by Apple ?

No kidding !

Plus I'm guessing Scott has signed enough NDA's to prevent him from working with companies that are in the same line of business anyways.

NDA's are common in mid level companies, so obviously the giants have them in place :)

post #87 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Did you use "Pages" for the collage"

Nope; MS Style - Quick 'n Dirty:

-DuckDuckGo > Steve Ballmer !Bi
- Drag thumbnails to Finder
- Arange icons so filenames are covered
- Cmd-Shift-4
- Upload .png

Anyhoo, has anyone seen the sequel to that terrible MS Nokia phone ad, The Wedding?

http://blogs.windows.com/windows_phone/b/windowsphone/archive/2013/08/22/if-you-thought-the-wedding-ad-was-funny-wait-until-you-see-the-recital.aspx
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post #88 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soloman View Post

Ok, so what will work?
Sell off Xbox and focus on enterprise and cloud.
post #89 of 315

 

I think those are great ads but they're really ads for a camera.  

 

If Apple can make a better camera for the iPhone (and you know they are working on it), then all of a sudden Nokia has nothing.  

post #90 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I think this means more ... "We are now going to start stealing from Google instead of Apple."  

Microsoft's strengths are enterprise computing and cloud.  When a CEO is fired by the board and they are looking at putting a board member in his place, generally they are talking about a re-think, and a re-organisation of everything they do on a strictly business basis.  To me this seems to mean that XBox will be gone, and trying to compete with Apple in the consumer sphere will also be gone.  

Think of a Microsoft laptop (which is really what Surface is let's face it), that competes with a Chromebook and runs all Microsoft services.  

I think they actually have a pretty good shot at this because Google is still currently too busy trying to be Apple, and hasn't yet realised that Android is a boat anchor and Chrome is the more likely future for them. 
Android was a defense against Microsoft and Apple in the mobile space. I free that Chrome is really the future for Google. That's what Microsoft needs to be worried about.
post #91 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Not if you go by the comments from both Ballmer and the Microsoft Board. They both claim Microsoft is transitioning to a devices and services company, and they've only just started.
I see that as a mistake. Trying to mimick the Apple model won't work. We've already seen with the write down of Surface inventory that the public isn't clamoring for Microsoft devices.

MS's mistake is thinking that they should make hardware to help sell their software.
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post #92 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

I think those are great ads but they're really ads for a camera.  

If Apple can make a better camera for the iPhone (and you know they are working on it), then all of a sudden Nokia has nothing.  
And what does Microsoft have if Apple adds side by side app multitaksking in iOS and makes iWork suite of apps free?
post #93 of 315
And with news of his departure MSFT is up 2%. What does that tell you? Know one believes in Ballmer and the future is brother with him gone.
post #94 of 315

Well, Redmond will get another Gorilla in its city zoo =D

post #95 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by APPLGUY View Post

And with news of his departure MSFT is up 2%. What does that tell you? Know one believes in Ballmer and the future is brother with him gone.


Up 6.5% at this point.

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post #96 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


In fact he could redo all of Windows with lots of skeuomorphism … images from land fills and dung heaps would be a good source for images …. 1biggrin.gif

So... in other words, just images of lots of Surface tablets?

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post #97 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

Why are people seriously throwing out Scott Forstall's name? What is his experience with running a large multinational? My guess is it will be someone internal or someone who previously worked at Microsoft like Ray Ozzie.

That was the furthest choice from my mind.

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post #98 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Not if you go by the comments from both Ballmer and the Microsoft Board. They both claim Microsoft is transitioning to a devices and services company, and they've only just started.


I remember when MS made the mistake of ignoring the internet and then Gates finally woke up and went after Netscape, killing it in very short order.

It's not going to be that easy this time. Damn near impossible, I'd say.

Windows is a dead end road if it can't be morphed into a mobile platform.

Microsoft is in big trouble. It might not look like it today... but looking out to the horizon, it must be looking rather dim for anyone with a vision at MS.

You nailed it!

Wintel machines will still be around (the trucks) but will become niche players.

MS Office, too, will be on a steady decline.

Apple's iWork apps on the desktop, mobile, touch and the web will disrupt MS Office (finally) for the masses.
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post #99 of 315

Interesting points being made by the financial talking heads on CNBC and Fox Business. Bill Gates is still the largest MSFT shareholder and is Chairman of the Board. Therefore Steve Ballmer is gone ONLY if Gates wants him gone. No argument, no discussion.

 

So it would appear that Bill Gates has in effect lost confidence in his old buddy.

post #100 of 315

Let's be serious for a moment.  Yes, Microsoft in the last dozen years has made a pile of money.  A big pile of money.  And Ballmer has been there from the early days of the company as he reminds everyone when they just had 30 employees.  His involvement in the company has enriched his own personal fortune to well over $20 billion, making him one of the richest men in the world.  Most of us would kill for that kind of success.

 

But history will not be kind for his legacy to the events of the last seven years.  Just like Microsoft completely owned the PC market in the early 90's and completely disrupted how businesses used computers (away from the established players of IBM, Burroughs/Sperry now Unisys, Digital Equipment, etc), Apple disrupted the PC business to mobile touch based devices.  The fact that Microsoft got caught flat footed by Apple when they owned a significant share of the mobile market in 2007 was bad enough.  But then Microsoft didn't take the threat seriously and allowed Google to be the "fast follower" and completely ceded what eventually ended up being the dominate position in phones and competitive in tablets.

 

The other things that Microsoft hasn't done relates to the Enterprise.  Most of you think that Microsoft "owns" the Enterprise, but in reality, they are only one player in a market where they are being consistently squeezed.  Linux systems replaced the need for a lot of Microsoft servers in the last decade.  Microsoft never made big plays into Enterprise software, choosing instead to make bets in small to midmarket players.  They allowed Oracle to pretty much absorb a lot of important companies without a fight despite having the cash to compete.  And Amazon has quietly become the biggest player in Infrastructure-As-A-Service (IaaS), hosting much of the business Internet which Microsoft could have certainly competed in given their deep pockets and experience.

 

Yes, Microsoft still makes a lot of money, largely on inertia from decisions made back in the '90s and of course, Xbox.  But Microsoft investors see how much money they left on the table in the largest expansion of the tech market since the 90's and the stock has languished.  CEOs are ultimately measured on their return of investment to shareholders.  And Microsoft stock has returned handsome dividends in the last decade.  But they could have seen startup growth all over again and that's what Ballmer's reign will be judged upon.

post #101 of 315
This is the wrong title, AI. It should be: "Ballmer retirement spells DOOM for Apple". 1smile.gif
post #102 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


I think those are great ads but they're really ads for a camera.  

If Apple can make a better camera for the iPhone (and you know they are working on it), then all of a sudden Nokia has nothing.  

I was planning on getting the minimum storage on my next iPhone... But, if they improve the camera, 128 GB (in between WiFi locations) may not be enough!
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post #103 of 315

Why Wait, please Go home for christmas, its better to start early with psychologist

post #104 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evilution View Post

Will Microsoft be able to recover from 13 years of this guy's idiotic control.
Answer: no, not now Apple is on the scene showing people how it's done.

I think one could make the case that the perception, whether correct or not, is that Apple has already reached its peak, that Apple's share of its various markets is declining and that there doesn't seem to be highly innovative new products in the pipeline, only some fine iterations.   Based on that, one could make the case that this is a prime time, with smart management, for someone to come in and put Microsoft back into a strong position, even with Apple hitting it from one side and Google from another (not to mention associated threats from companies like Samsung). 

 

Microsoft has failed at many things, but with some tweaks to Surface and Windows 8 and a re-think of IE, they could actually create some products that people actually want.     Last winter, when Microsoft set up a pop-up retail store in Times Square, I stopped in and played a few minutes with a Windows phone and it really wasn't as bad as people made out (not that I would have traded in my iPhone for it).    The graphic design was pretty good, in some ways superior to Apple,  and it had that app that would translate street signs and the like by holding the phone up to a scene.   Having said that, I didn't spend enough time with the phone to figure out what would really annoy me.  

 

While it was probably a mistake for Microsoft to attempt to combine the portable device and computer OS into one and the actual implementation was not great, I do have to give them some credit for thinking about the OS in terms of the activities that people perform instead of still keeping it application based, as Apple mostly has. 

 

I think Microsoft has to rethink not just its PC strategy, but its Apple strategy.   One really annoying thing for me is that if you don't use Exchange, but use Outlook, you can no longer sync via iCloud and sync Outlook's calendar and address book to the iPhone and other devices.   I don't know whether it's Apple or Microsoft that's the problem (I suspect it's Apple), but I think they have to find a way to work together and resolve that.     People who work at corporations primarily use Outlook, for better or worse.    

 

Of course, if Apple actually does have some innovative new products in the pipeline that are highly accepted by the marketplace, that could put Microsoft years behind again.

post #105 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


What are you talking about? Microsoft is the 3rd or 4th most valuable company in the world. They basically own the enterprise. Microsoft is FAR from being run in to the ground.

 

Well, Apple is THE MOST VALUABLE company in the world and people have no trouble saying it's being run into the ground. We hear it every day.

 

By the way, MSFT is now #7 on the list according to Wikipedia.

post #106 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

MS's mistake is thinking that they should make hardware to help sell their software.

Actually, I see it as a failure to adapt. Same thing that just killed Blackberry. Myopic leader(s) can't see beyond the current quarter and miss long-term trends that spell the end of their industry.

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post #107 of 315
...bringing to an end a 13-year reign of terror over the software giant.
post #108 of 315

I wish that he stay and cause more misfortunes at MSFT.
 

post #109 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Actually, I see it as a failure to adapt. Same thing that just killed Blackberry. Myopic leader(s) can't see beyond the current quarter and miss long-term trends that spell the end of their industry.

It's also a failure of eating into your own products. Kodak failed with digital cameras because they did not want to eat at their film biz. MS "failed" because they did not want to eat their Windows business.
post #110 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


You nailed it!

Wintel machines will still be around (the trucks) but will become niche players.

MS Office, too, will be on a steady decline.

Apple's iWork apps on the desktop, mobile, touch and the web will disrupt MS Office (finally) for the masses.

 

Apple hasn't updated iWork in almost 5 years.

 

I'm not sure if they're interested in disrupting Microsoft Office.

 

Anyway Microsoft has new cash cow Office 365, and that will keep them relevant at least with businesses for another decade or so.

post #111 of 315
Amen, they have a lot of bright people and a huge machine behind them. If they just hire someone with TASTE and the power to assert it over the committee mentality, they could kick butt. I love my PC and long for them to just get a clue, enhance on good themes and stop turning the cart upside down at each revision. I wish them well.
post #112 of 315
Ballmer: "I'm reeatch, beeatch!"

Kinda takes the joy out of it.
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post #113 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

Interesting points being made by the financial talking heads on CNBC and Fox Business. Bill Gates is still the largest MSFT shareholder and is Chairman of the Board. Therefore Steve Ballmer is gone ONLY if Gates wants him gone. No argument, no discussion.

 

So it would appear that Bill Gates has in effect lost confidence in his old buddy.

 

It's hard to completely discern the actions of the Microsoft Board of Directors based upon the press release.  Yes Bill Gates still effectively controls Microsoft through his stock and board position, but Ballmer's own stake in Microsoft isn't tiny...it's pretty enormous too.  Did the board think it was time for new blood?  Maybe.  Did Ballmer think after all these years with the company that it was time to slow down?  Maybe.

 

The biggest surprise in all this is that a successor isn't waiting in the wings that was being specifically groomed for the job.  Apple had to do this because of Steve Jobs' long time health problems and all companies have contingency plans in case a CEO dies or resigns suddenly.  IBM and GE have always groomed executives for CEO succession.  But right now there isn't a natural obvious choice...in fact, Microsoft has forced out a number of potential choices over the years.  I do think Microsoft felt they had to make a public announcement now since a CEO search wouldn't be secret for five minutes and would undermine Ballmer if nothing had been said.

post #114 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

I think Microsoft has to rethink not just its PC strategy, but its Apple strategy.   One really annoying thing for me is that if you don't use Exchange, but use Outlook, you can no longer sync via iCloud and sync Outlook's calendar and address book to the iPhone and other devices.   I don't know whether it's Apple or Microsoft that's the problem (I suspect it's Apple), but I think they have to find a way to work together and resolve that.     People who work at corporations primarily use Outlook, for better or worse. 

 

Interesting analysis.

 

It would be interesting if we saw Apple and Microsoft actually collaborate together more in this Post-PC anti-Google landscape. 

 

Apple of course has a massive post-PC infrastructure, and Microsoft has a massive enterprise infrastructure. The 2 working together could actually make both companies stronger and more laser focused as Tim would say. To those who think the idea is impossible, Microsoft and Apple have already seemingly partnered with Bing on Siri.

post #115 of 315

He never made it out of the Windows/Office era. 

post #116 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

Apple hasn't updated iWork in almost 5 years.

I'm not sure if they're interested in disrupting Microsoft Office.

Anyway Microsoft has new cash cow Office 365, and that will keep them relevant at least with businesses for another decade or so.

How is moving that software online not an update?

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post #117 of 315
It's about bloody time...
post #118 of 315
Scott Forestall - Microsoft CEO?
post #119 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc Rogoff View Post

Scott Forestall - Microsoft CEO?

He's back... and this time... it's personal!

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post #120 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by donw35 View Post

Good, Microsoft needs some new fresh leadership. the same old follow what Apple is doing isn't going to work anymore.

Actually, I don't think Microsoft ever followed what Apple was doing. Instead, they made a half-hearted attempt to copy some of Apple's PRODUCTS, but that's not the key to Apple's success. IOW, the problem was in execution, not in the strategy of learning from Apple.

If they really want to learn from Apple, they would:

1. Understand what the customers need (even better than the customers do themselves). Let customer needs dictate direction, not some egomaniac in an R&D management position.

2. Stop thinking that throwing money at a problem will solve everything. Their R&D expenditures are much higher than Apple's, yet their innovation is only a fraction of what Apple does. Value innovation, not numbers.

3. Be willing to scrap some of their legacy. There's really no strong reason why every OS they release has to run on 15 year old hardware. They could start by announcing that the current Windows will be the last (although they might agree to maintain it for longer than normal). Throw it out and build a robust, registry-free OS from the ground up that takes advantage of modern hardware without all the junk. Build security in rather than tacking it on.

4. Find a way for their R&D groups to work together more effectively. This is somewhat limited by their consent decree, but there's still a huge opportunity for the groups to share experience and solve problem together rather than having a brick wall between departments.

5. Set aside a significant budget for pie-in-the-sky projects where they let people's imagination soar free. Unfortunately, they must resist the temptation to staff this department with people who were successful in the Microsoft Office or XBox group - they want people who are creative and not bound by what's out there now. Maintain absolute secrecy in this department and resist the temptation to show it off to outsiders.

If they do those things, they'll provide strong competition for Apple and will have a much stronger future. Unfortunately for them, I don't think they have a culture that would allow that to happen. Unless they bring someone in from outside and give them the power to really shake things up, they'll never get there.
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