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CEO Steve Ballmer's exit not as 'planned' or 'smooth' as suggested by Microsoft - Page 2

post #41 of 134
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post
The XBox One looks like junk.

 

I like it. It looks like a milk carton, and that will only help solidify its complete and utter failure. The Ribbon just makes me laugh every time I see it. lol.gif

 

Every single time I use Windows, without fail, I wind up asking myself, "How has human civilization not collapsed being forced to use software this F—ING USELESS?!" If I copy a file, the entire OS locks up until it's done. HOW IS THIS ACCEPTABLE?!

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #42 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


While Gates didn't "instigate" Ballmer's retirement, he wasn't as much of an advocate as he had been in the past, one source suggested.

Yeah. right... If you believe that I have a bridge Surface to sell you!

Quote:


In an effort to counter the successes seen by Apple in recent years, Ballmer announced a major realignment of Microsoft in July. The sweeping company-wide restructuring plan is focused on positioning Microsoft has a devices and services company, which Ballmer said at the time would enable it to "innovate with greater speed, efficiency and capability."

Sure... I'll take a keyboard, a mouse, an Xbox, Kinect, and ...

.....

Quote:
Going forward, our strategy will focus on creating a family of devices and services for individuals and businesses that empower people around the globe at home, at work and on the go, for the activities they value most.

We will do this by leveraging our strengths. We have powered devices for many years through Windows PCs and Xbox. We have delivered high-value experiences through Office and other apps. And, we have enabled enterprise value through products like Windows Server and Exchange. The form of delivery shifts to a broader set of devices and services versus packaged software. The frontier of high-value scenarios we enable will march outward, but we have strengths and proven capabilities on which we will draw.
http://techland.time.com/2013/07/11/microsofts-devices-and-services-era-begins-today/

Ambitious goals!

It would help a just a little bit if you had only one successful hardware product of the type you describe -- rather than a consecutive string of dismal failures!

Who is going to believe that you can do it -- too much fail, too late!
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post #43 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post

Eventually, the captain of a sinking ship gets thrown overboard.  He will be fine in retirement unlike hundreds of thousands of windows users.
 

Because you think that Windows users who retire without enough income are in that position because of Microsoft?    That's an absurd comment.   

 

Microsoft has certainly failed at many things, but I'm not sure that different leadership, including Bill Gates himself, would have made much difference.    And before we all jump on the "Ballmer's an idiot" bandwagon, note that Apple might find itself in a similar position in five years (although I can't imagine any head of Apple behaving as obnoxiously as Ballmer has).    When companies grow too large, they are not able to respond as quickly as smaller, more nimble companies.     There's more bureaucracy and the risks are greater.   I think we've already seen that at Apple as both hardware and OS updates have become incremental.  Each year gets a slightly better processor in a slightly thinner box and a few more features are thrown into the OS, many of which won't be used by the vast majority of users and some in which many users, including many on this site, wish Apple hadn't changed, but since the release of the iPad, we're not seeing anything that changes markets.    And somehow, I don't think an iWatch is going to revolutionize much of anything.    

 

As far as the current supposed reorg of Microsoft is concerned, a senior exec once said to me that there's only two things CEOs really do:  they either centralize or they decentralize.   So right now, Microsoft is centralizing to get rid of the "islands".     The next CEO might choose to decentralize again so that each unit can do what it does best and because there really isn't any synergy anyway.   And while Windows 8 has not been accepted in the marketplace, while there's lots to hate about it, there's also lots to like.   I think for the first time in Microsoft's history, they've taken a fairly decent approach to graphic design and use of fonts.   I was actually pretty surprised.   

 

As far as Ballmer is concerned, if he really wants to run a company, he can start a new one:  he certainly has the cash to do so and he can probably find backers if he didn't want to use his own money.    He'll probably fail at it, but he can keep himself busy. 

post #44 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by murman View Post

His dumbest move was to make so many Windows RTs, what was that again, 900mil write off? 

 

not cool to investors who see how much money is in the bank, and how much is coming in, as serious business. 

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post #45 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Wow. That would be poetic. Ballmer, wronged by the company he loves, gets even by giving Apple Microsoft's old secrets and lies. Heck, were he to give Apple the truth about all the evil Microsoft has done, I'd be okay with Apple hiring him to do… something non-critical to hardware or software. Since he's a businessman, maybe he could come under Tim Cook's wing, shadowing him for a few years.

What secrets?  It would be like hiring Homer Simpson and finding out his big secret was to copy another company's playbook.  

post #46 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

On which planet?

LOL!

I love how the article made it sound like people actually valued Ballmer's contributions to the tech world.
post #47 of 134
Scott Forstall, CEO Microsoft.
Discuss.
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post #48 of 134
Originally Posted by HammerofTruth View Post
What secrets?  It would be like hiring Homer Simpson and finding out his big secret was to copy another company's playbook.  

 

Proof of illegal activity = perfect lawsuit for damages.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #49 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post


They pulled out his phone and cut the network connections... and he can't leave his office while he's in the building.

"DON'T TOUCH ANYTHING!!"

LOL

He could have some revengeful fun in the next year ... he should sell all his shares now, so he doesn't care, and secretly work with Apple to Xerox all Microsoft's secret, innovative ideas ... Oh wait a minute ...

Whoa... You had me goin' for a while..

Too much FL sun? 1biggrin.gif
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post #50 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


I already said it ... partially in jest ... why not copy Steve yet again ... Gates steps in as interim and labels himself ... iCEO

The difference is, of couse, that Bill has nothing to prove.  Being the richest man in the world (or in the top 3, or whatever) and being a beloved, world-famous philanthropist will do that for ya.  Being the guy who comes in and make a company "more like Apple" isn't something he'd want to be associated with. 

post #51 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

What CEO announces a major reorg and then a month later says he/she's retiring? Of course he was pushed out. Question is will the new CEO be forced to carry out his reorg plan? Will they only look for people who are 100% on board with that change? My guess is it will be external as I can't imagine any one of the four EVP engineers working for the other.

I wonder if there is even a remote possibility that Gates steps in as iCEO, he always loved copying Steve. 1biggrin.gif

I suspect not... and another Gates reign would not resolve Microsoft's problems. Gates never had the luxury of learning by experiencing a major failure.

I figure, the new CEO will be an outside hire and will be in place by Christmas. That gives him/her 1 year, max, to make the necessary changes and publicly righten the ship's course..

I wonder if Gates will allow the next CEO to make the necessary changes... I suspect not!

Finally, I can see MS being successful as a "software and services" company -- and no chance as a "devices and services" company.
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post #52 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Dismissals were "smooth."

LOL

Best post so far on this subject!
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post #53 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Quote:
secretly work with Apple to Xerox all Microsoft's secret, innovative ideas

Wow. That would be poetic. Ballmer, wronged by the company he loves, gets even by giving Apple Microsoft's old secrets and lies. Heck, were he to give Apple the truth about all the evil Microsoft has done, I'd be okay with Apple hiring him to do… something non-critical to hardware or software. Since he's a businessman, maybe he could come under Tim Cook's wing, shadowing him for a few years.

Nah... Just legacy baggage!
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post #54 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


I already said it ... partially in jest ... why not copy Steve yet again ... Gates steps in as interim and labels himself ... iCEO

I saw that... but it's a step backwards for Gates. He's busy with the Foundation and his invention lab in upstate Washington (saw a report of the 50 day vaccine "thermos" created there). So I'm thinking no actual return for Gates.

 

Ah well, MS might just not want the interruption of an iCEO. That means to me, naming the full time CEO at the first of the year.

post #55 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

They really need to start placing more importance on design too - designers, designer, designers first and developers, developers, developers second. The XBox One looks like junk. Same with things like this:



As opposed to something like this:




Or this:

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post #56 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post

Eventually, the captain of a sinking ship gets thrown overboard.  He will be fine in retirement unlike hundreds of thousands of windows users.
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by msuberly View Post


Huh, what does one's operating system have to do with one's retirement?

 

Obviously you don't see the context.  He is worth billions and will retire with no worries.  Meanwhile, all those users who bought Windows contributed to his billions and will not have it so financially well off in retirement, and not because we bought Windows before it is assumed that is what I meant.


Edited by icoco3 - 8/26/13 at 10:33am
post #57 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post

Eventually, the captain of a sinking ship gets thrown overboard.  He will be fine in retirement unlike hundreds of thousands of windows users.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

Because you think that Windows users who retire without enough income are in that position because of Microsoft?    That's an absurd comment.   

...

 

Your comment is absurd by applying your own interpretation of my comment then demeaning it.

post #58 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave MacLachlan View Post

They're going to have a heckuva time removing the fingernail scratches from his desk when they finally drag him out the door.

Mmm... I wonder where his chair went 1confused.gif
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post #59 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

They really need to start placing more importance on design too - designers, designer, designers first and developers, developers, developers second. The XBox One looks like junk. Same with things like this:

 

You know someone doesn't have any clue about GUI when you look at this mess.

 

Microsoft can't even settle on a coherent UI for they're own apps:

 

post #60 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


I suspect not... and another Gates reign would not resolve Microsoft's problems. Gates never had the luxury of learning by experiencing a major failure.

I figure, the new CEO will be an outside hire and will be in place by Christmas. That gives him/her 1 year, max, to make the necessary changes and publicly righten the ship's course..

I wonder if Gates will allow the next CEO to make the necessary changes... I suspect not!

Finally, I can see MS being successful as a "software and services" company -- and no chance as a "devices and services" company.

 

I don't believe Gates *could* come back and do anything except the same thing the company has done; Ballmer was merely an extension of Gates. They never were the innovation or product management centred company, they were just very, very good business managers who knew how to copy, steal, manipulate, make proprietary, acquire, create a virtual monopoly and leverage it, and market software very well. Gates would not be the new blood and fresh set of ideas that is needed.


The new CEO will absolutely be an external hire, and he/she will come in having negotiated a lot of freedom to make significant changes to the corporation - and I think he or she will have a couple of years, 3 max to affect the changes and realise positive results. Interesting times ahead for Microsoft, I think we won't recognise it as the same company in 5 years, that's what the board is looking for and that's why Ballmer has been ousted without a replacement but a 1 year time frame to find one, me thinks. :-)

post #61 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Mmm... I wonder where his chair went 1confused.gif

He's taking it with him.

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post #62 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

...The XBox One looks like junk. Same with things like this:

 

...and unfortunately, that's what people have sadly come to expect. There's a very successful healthcare software company whose flagship product (like almost all of it's competitors) was written entirely by engineers using Visual Basic, and it looks that way. Endless rows and columns of tabs and buttons and crap that you rarely use, closing down the actual working space to a little fraction of a window even on a big monitor. And it's very successful because there's nothing better, and plenty that's worse.

 

I do disagree about your comments re Ballmer and the stock price. Kind of surprised at the generally solicitous (or at least semi-neutral) reviews on Ballmer's tenure. Remember, after _13 years_, the stock price of what was the market tech powerhouse remains barely half that of when he took over. His public predictions of the tech future were embarrassingly wrong, repeatedly, and with Zune, Kin and other Windows phones, Vista and Win 8, he left a trail of too-late-me-too, or just plain bad products.

 
Empirically, he's got to be among the worst CEOs ever, I think - at least when you consider how long the MSFT board gave him to get it right.
post #63 of 134

Rubin?

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post #64 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

Rubin?

Thanks, but I already had lunch.
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post #65 of 134
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The sweeping company-wide restructuring plan is focused on positioning Microsoft has a devices and services company, which Ballmer said at the time would enable it to "innovate with greater speed, efficiency and capability."
 

 

The phrase "rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic" comes to mind here.

Re-orgs serve three purposes in a company as big and fossilized as Microsoft:

 

1. Re-orgs appease the board and shareholders because they create the appearance of change.

2. Some upper- and middle-management will quit because they were slighted or hate their new assignments.

3. They send a message to the entire workforce: "We're serious this time.  Shape up or ship out."

 

Sure, the re-org might smooth out communication between groups and managers.

But the real problem is Microsoft's decades-old culture.  The culture of a lazy, un-threatened monopoly.

Only caring about exploiting their monopoly position in desktop OS-es and desktop productivity apps.

Unable and unwilling to develop anything new.  Anything that could threaten their bread-and-butter business.

Microsoft has been a sitting duck during Ballmer's tenure as CEO, ripe for innovative disruption to blindside.

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post #66 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


Which I find surprising because the design for the XBox 360 was chosen when the most common answer for the design was 'it looks like something Apple might build'.


Only "something Apple might build" to "non-Appleites." XBox 360 has buttons up the front and some sort of attachment on top. Not Apple-like, IMHO.

 

post #67 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post

Eventually, the captain of a sinking ship gets thrown overboard.  He will be fine in retirement unlike hundreds of thousands of windows users.
 

I don't think of Microsoft as a sinking ship, but it is laying on its side just off the coast of Italy...

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post #68 of 134

Microsoft needs more then a superstar CEO that everyone is hoping for.  No one men can mastered business marketing, day to day managing and R&D, Microsoft needs a good products-softwares engineer more than another business manager.  

post #69 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

Rubin?


Please, no.

post #70 of 134
So. Bill Gates WAS propping up his college buddy Steve Ballmer all these years...

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post #71 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by H2P View Post


Only "something Apple might build" to "non-Appleites." XBox 360 has buttons up the front and some sort of attachment on top. Not Apple-like, IMHO.

The attachment on top was the HDD which they've moved internally but still removable. This was almost 10 years ago so don't look it it with eyes of Apple's designs today. It was definitely a big visual upgrade from the original Xbox and I'm surprised that they've gone backwards in the design. Zero thought went into the new design and I cannot believe that MS doesn't have one person working for them that couldn't come up with a nice design.
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post #72 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by murman View Post

His dumbest move was to make so many Windows RTs, what was that again, 900mil write off?

From things I've read online, it pushed the board to finally act. They're letting him retire to save face.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Esteban View Post

Scott Forstall, CEO Microsoft.
Discuss.

Not the right person for the job.

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post #73 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

I don't think of Microsoft as a sinking ship, but it is laying on its side just off the coast of Italy...

 

Or...Titanic?

post #74 of 134
http://mobile.bloomberg.com/news/2013-08-24/steve-ballmer-failed-to-take-microsoft-beyond-the-pc.html

"Ballmer put his stamp on Microsoft by dint of his intellect..."

I'd say that sums up everything that's ever needed to be said about him.
post #75 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post

Eventually, the captain of a sinking ship gets thrown overboard.  He will be fine in retirement unlike hundreds of thousands of windows users.
 

Except that he's more like Dracula on a ship- sucking everyone and everything dry. He sucked all the integrity out of Microsoft.

 
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post #76 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

On which planet?

 

You are mean.
post #77 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

I don't think of Microsoft as a sinking ship, but it is laying on its side just off the coast of Italy...

 

Why Italy? Berlusconi was kicked down.
post #78 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

When companies grow too large, they are not able to respond as quickly as smaller, more nimble companies.     There's more bureaucracy and the risks are greater.   I think we've already seen that at Apple as both hardware and OS updates have become incremental.  Each year gets a slightly better processor in a slightly thinner box and a few more features are thrown into the OS, many of which won't be used by the vast majority of users and some in which many users, including many on this site, wish Apple hadn't changed, but since the release of the iPad, we're not seeing anything that changes markets.

 

The iPad was, what, 3 years ago? The iPhone 3 years before that? You want something that 'changes markets' every year? Isn't that a bit asking too much?

 

The first ten years of this century have been exceptional in that Apple (never small, so more a 'large nimble company') cranked out more than one 'market changing' innovation. Demanding that such a stream of size/speed keeps up is not rational.

 

Besides, there have been many smaller 'deep' innovations that made larger ones happen. These are the ones one does not notice as being important, but still happen. Look at what Apple has done to things like battery life, screen resolution, multi-touch, codecs, miniaturisation, 'instant-on' (on a unix-like kernel no less) and many other things that were instrumental in their 'market changing' new products. These are all somewhat incremental. Apple's string of market changers was built on these enabling innovations by apparently very forward-looking techs

post #79 of 134
Windows phone MAY have been a factor in the past, but only because there was NOTHING better, in reality the Windows CE based phone with a stylus was total rubbish. Steve was right, we all have universal pointing devices fully integrated.
post #80 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMac2 View Post

Microsoft needs more then a superstar CEO that everyone is hoping for.  No one men can mastered business marketing, day to day managing and R&D, Microsoft needs a good products-softwares engineer more than another business manager.  

What Microsoft needs is someone with a passion for 'user experience'. They started with someone with a passion for bits&bytes (and with many misses, let's  not forget how much energy was spent on hopeless AI-like ventures and promises of cool stuff that was only vapour), Ballmer is a 'passion for money' type; user experience as just a way to make money. But it doesn't work purely like that. Most Microsoft's stuff isn't used for the experience, but because people have to. Maybe Xbox is the exception.

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