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Parallels Access brings Mac and Windows programs to Apple's iPad with full gesture support - Page 2

post #41 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

 MS Office is one of the last remaining hurdles to throwing MS out of many corporations and thus requiring them to hang on to PCs and consider Surface tablets.

Office is not so much of an issue as iWork can already handle almost all of those documents. The real hurdle is Active Directory. You'll have a very difficult time logging into the network especially through a VPN and trying to navigate around to various mapped drives. Expect a lot of failed connections on your Mac. As long as IT is using these MS servers and tools they will be Windows specific for many tasks.

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rcfa View Post

 My machines have public IPs so I don't need some connection service that jeopardizes data security; and with IPv6 there is no excuse left for NAT, either.

I hope you at least have a firewall in front of those public IPs.

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post #42 of 69

Got excited at first but I will stick with Logmein Ignition (I bought 3.5 years ago before the price skyrocketed) and I can use multiple computers. Has a great experience on the iPad.

post #43 of 69

I get along pretty well with Apple's Back to my Mac. Of course it doesn't work on an iPad but as someone else mentioned desktop apps are not designed for a touch interface anyway so I can't even imagine how frustrating it would be to use on a complex app like Photoshop or AutoCad. 

 

I use my MBP and back to my Mac to connect to my Mac Pro when I'm on the road. What used to be an issue was the resolution difference between the MBP and the Cinema, but now with retina it is not so bad. That is one nice thing about MS Remote Desktop is that you can connect at different resolutions other than the host default. I wonder how this Parallels app handles the resolution issue. Does it pan and zoom?

 

Getting VNC running on all the different machines of various platforms is a pain, but as long as I can get into one Windows box and my Mac, I'm able to do almost anything on the network no matter where I am. I just use SSH on the Unix boxes. In most cases I don't even bother with VNC as they are just servers.

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post #44 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

 

Well it doesn't really seem to be a remote desktop client at all, more like a remote app server app.  A better approach to be sure and probably the reason for the failure of the other attempts. 

 

What failure? Remote Desktop / VNC apps have been a failure?

 

Get a clue., Gazoobee.

post #45 of 69

Can't believe this needs to be pointed out, but from the comments so far, it apparently does...

 

 

VNC APPS ARE FOR: Accessing a Mac or PC that you are away from, from another Mac, PC, iPad, iPhone.

 

 

PARALLELS ACCESS IS FOR: Running Mac or PC apps at near-native behavior on an iPad.

post #46 of 69

I just downloaded and installed the app on my iPad. It prompts you to download the agent app on your Mac. As soon as the agent installs and runs, your computer shows up on the iPad.

 

Tap on the computer, and the agent shifts the computer display(s) to a low resolution so that the display (only the main one) shows up (sufficiently large for tapping smaller items) on the iPad. Though you can switch to desktop mode, you still CANNOT zoom in and out on the display (though you may be able to zoom within apps). This is a deal-breaker for me, as most of my apps need and want all the resolution of my 27" iMac display, as well as my second display.

 

I've been using Edovia Screens as a VNC on my iPad, and I like it better than Logmein Ignition. It allows me to scroll and zoom in and out all over BOTH displays.

 

A lot of Parallels Access seems pretty slick, but they need to refine it further.

Daniel Swanson

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Daniel Swanson

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post #47 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

This is not really for consumers but for large businesses that want to run legacy custom company-specific Windows based software on their large iPad base.

Sorry, I wasn't very clear was I? I was also saying that only ... backwards ... I was saying I couldn't see any use for normal folks (as it is intended for corporate types) ... I was trying to anticipate the screams over the price coming from 'normal' folks and point out they would not need it in the first place.
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post #48 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Office is not so much of an issue as iWork can already handle almost all of those documents. The real hurdle is Active Directory. You'll have a very difficult time logging into the network especially through a VPN and trying to navigate around to various mapped drives. Expect a lot of failed connections on your Mac. As long as IT is using these MS servers and tools they will be Windows specific for many tasks.

Hey, I'll bow to your knowledge on this as I am no IT / MS expert, but I'd like to think Parallels have taken this into account already one way or another. Question: If you were operating Windows 8 in a VM wouldn't you already be using Windows tools? Isn't the point that IT would not be using iWorks, they'd still be using their beloved Office, only from an iPad.
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post #49 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Question: If you were operating Windows 8 in a VM wouldn't you already be using Windows tools? Isn't the point that IT would not be using iWorks, they'd still be using their beloved Office, only from an iPad.

Sure, if you are running Windows in Parallels it behaves just like any other Windows machine (for the most part). My original comment was in reply to corporations tossing MS out altogether, which I think is unlikely but not so much because of Office. I was referring the difficulties of using a Mac to traverse a typical Windows corporate network with Active Directory which is very Windows centric. I am not at all familiar with how Parallels Access works, but in general, if it is connecting to your Mac which has no Windows installed it probably won't help much in terms of facilitating seamless access to a Windows corporate network.

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post #50 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

The part about working with word is hilarious.  It basically turns Word into Pages for iOS by using the pages gestures and the pages toolbar popup.

Like you say though, it doesn't show what happens when you go near that nightmare toolbar at the top of Word for OS X.  Pages on iOS does most of what Word's ribbon does with just a few buttons.

There's another demo here that shows the filesystem dialog:



For a while, people have wondered what a touch-based OS X would be like and from what I can see, it looks like iOS. The limitations with iOS vs the Mac really just come down to the available software and sharing files between apps. As far as interaction with the software, it pretty much has to behave like iOS with full-screen windows to be useable.
post #51 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

There's another demo here that shows the filesystem dialog:



For a while, people have wondered what a touch-based OS X would be like and from what I can see, it looks like iOS. The limitations with iOS vs the Mac really just come down to the available software and sharing files between apps. As far as interaction with the software, it pretty much has to behave like iOS with full-screen windows to be useable.

Thanks for the link. Very impressive indeed. This also shows that SaaS for iPad is virtually limitless with zero rewriting of the code for iOS per se. Here is an idea for the like's of Adobe ... You could rent time on any application there is for Mac or PC when ever needed, no need for annual rental or purchases. Kind of like the Lynda.com system only for applications rather than training videos. In fact, if I were Lynda, I'd be looking at training with application rental as an option!
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post #52 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

Can't believe this needs to be pointed out, but from the comments so far, it apparently does...

 

 

VNC APPS ARE FOR: Accessing a Mac or PC that you are away from, from another Mac, PC, iPad, iPhone.

 

 

PARALLELS ACCESS IS FOR: Running Mac or PC apps at near-native behavior on an iPad.

 

Except the apps in Parallels are still running on your Mac or PC that you are away from...it's not like they are actually running on the iPad.
post #53 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by richsadams View Post

If this works as advertised (and having used Parallels for several years, I've no reason to believe that it won't) it will be a final nail in the MS Surface's coffin...plus another push into full-on Enterprise use.

You can't see the coffin for the nails.

post #54 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

There's another demo here that shows the filesystem dialog:

 

That is a nice demo. I now have a little bit better understanding of how it works. The file open dialog does show all the files, but only to pick one to open. I wonder if you have access to the Finder in general, to move, copy, rename, delete, create folders, etc. I still think I prefer VNC with my MBP -> Mac Pro, but Parallels Access is pretty impressive. I just don't like any limitations at all which is why I don't ever try to do any real productivity work on my iPad. I want the full power of OS X when I need to do real work, but that is just me because I'm sure many people can get by with an iPad. My work requires a lot Adobe CS which definitely needs the full desktop.

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post #55 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooch View Post

 

Except the apps in Parallels are still running on your Mac or PC that you are away from...it's not like they are actually running on the iPad.

 

Except that the ENTIRE PURPOSE of Parallels Access is to NOT be just another VNC client that lets you slowly peck away at an App running on your machine...it optimizes everything so that the experience is as close to native as possible.

 

And from what I can see, the behavior is FAR superior to any VNC app, as it looks and feels like working on a local App....not the hunt & peck & wait for the far-away computer to respond.

post #56 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by tribalogical View Post

Subscription-based software again? Now there's a trend I am never going to buy into, even if it means a return to those previous, luddite-like, computer-free-lifestyle days: my 1970's teens.

I've already bought my last version of Creative Suite (Adobe). No "creative cloud subscription required" for me, thanks. Ever. (I'll try to make this one last, then I'll MAKE a damned alternative if I have to.)

No subscription-only "Office 360" type suites for me either. Ever.

Subscription only? No sale!


Yes, I'm old-fashioned. A pro-software power-user who doesn't believe in depending on "cloud based" subscription-dependent platforms to get work done. I license it from you ONCE, I use it when/as/if I like, update on an as-needed basis (when I decide to), and pay for upgrades when I feel like (or can afford) it.

Subscription-based software is neither less expensive or all that much more convenient. It's just another kind of "product slavery". Some claim it's a way to reduce piracy and therefore costs. But I guarantee that's a ruse to earn more profits. Prices won't go down. Nor will services particularly improve.

OK, that was my soapbox. I'm climbing down now. 1wink.gif

I am going to jump on your soapbox now,

 

I can not agree more, this whole cloud based applications suck. I hate to say I am too old to change, but in this case change is only in the best interest of the developers of the product. I am really tire of this whole notion you do not own the software, you only a user of its and at any time the developer can supposedly yank you right to use at any time. Just look at any web based tool or app out there, like gmail, how many time has gmail changes its look and feel or how the application works. I am not interested in waking up in the morning to find out the developer over night decide to update their app and now I have to learn how to use it again. Software people seem to think that ever time they have a new bright idea that everyone wants it immediately. Imagine if GM update how your car work while you sleep and then the next day you have to figure how to unlock and drive your car today because they has a new bright idea how to keep the thieves from stealing your car.

 

Okay someone else can have the soapbox now.

post #57 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

Just look at any web based tool or app out there, like gmail, how many time has gmail changes its look and feel or how the application works. I am not interested in waking up in the morning to find out the developer over night decide to update their app and now I have to learn how to use it again. Software people seem to think that ever time they have a new bright idea that everyone wants it immediately. 

Well that is not how this app works. It is not cloud based. You download it. Same with Adobe CS, the app is on your machine. It works the same as any other native application except you have to pay for it either annually or monthly just like your cable TV, your cell phone service, your car insurance, your mortgage, your health insurance, income taxes, just about every other modern service that is important. Usually the only apps that would be subscription based are going to be very valuable to business users. It is a profitability/productivity equation. For the most part, casual home users are not the target audience.

 

Also, in response to your complaint about web apps updating without notice: That can be a good thing if there is a security issue or a bug, it can be fixed immediately for everyone. Redesigning the interface may not always be welcome but...


Edited by mstone - 8/28/13 at 10:24am

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post #58 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

 

What failure? Remote Desktop / VNC apps have been a failure?

 

Get a clue., Gazoobee.

Don't over-react dude.  I was referring to the article where they talked about how none of the solutions so far have really worked that well.  Sorry for using what is apparently a hot-button word for you. 

post #59 of 69
Quote:

Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

Well that is not how this app works. It is not cloud based. You download it. Same with Adobe CS, the app is on your machine. It works the same as any other native application except you have to pay for it either annually or monthly just like your cable TV, your cell phone service, your car insurance, your mortgage, your health insurance, income taxes, just about every other modern service that is important. 

 

The key difference is, that a service is a service, and software is software. Just because it's SOLD AS SERVICE does NOT mean it IS A SERVICE.

If the US conducts a war today, then of course that can't be paid with the tax paid for waging WWII. Insurance is the price of a adverse risky event having the chance to occur in any given period. Mobile phone service has to maintain and keep operable the radio network and communications network that users actively use.

 

Software is written once, there's no moral right for the developer to keep getting compensated. If Adobe were to write their software properly it wouldn't break with each OS update, what they want is to be compensated for their negligence and incompetence, and derive from that ongoing "maintenance activity" the right to rape users.

 

It's a morally perverse idea that the maker of a product has a right to a percentage of the income stream derived from his tools. Let's think about that: The architects of Apple's new headquarters want annual dividend payments based on the utility that Apple has from having corporate headquarters. The phone company wants a cut from all drug deals arranged using mobile phones, etc. and fitting with that line of thinking Adobe wants an annual fee, based on the "utility users have from using their software"

 

Wait until your local furniture store gets the idea of "couch as a service" and "bed at a service": built in electronic meters that measure how much you sleep, screw, watch TV, and at the end of each month you get a bill that reflects the utility you had from your furniture.

post #60 of 69
I have been part of the beta program and I can confirm this is actually as awesome as it sounds. It does work really well although I admit I'm not sure it's worth $80/year.

I did have issues with some Windows apps namely an application we use at work called Infusion which is our call management application. I put it down to the fact that the application is like 90% of all Windows applications and is badly written.

However, on the Mac apps it works brilliantly although I suspect some of the more complex applications like Photoshop may have issues but I never tried that because I don't have it.

All in all this is far better than the remote control out there.
post #61 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Sure, if you are running Windows in Parallels it behaves just like any other Windows machine (for the most part). My original comment was in reply to corporations tossing MS out altogether, which I think is unlikely but not so much because of Office. I was referring the difficulties of using a Mac to traverse a typical Windows corporate network with Active Directory which is very Windows centric. I am not at all familiar with how Parallels Access works, but in general, if it is connecting to your Mac which has no Windows installed it probably won't help much in terms of facilitating seamless access to a Windows corporate network.

Actually traversing ActiveDirectory is relatively easy if only a little different. This is because Windows still insists on using drive names like A B C D E... whereas UNIX based systems like OS X don't. Mapping drives is dead easy on OS X and remapping them is just as easy using Login Items in the preference pane.

 

I personally use an AppleScript application to map the drives because it's a bit easier and before you complain about a script that's EXACTLY how ActiveDirectory maps drives, at least for Windows XP machines which most businesses are still insistent on using despite it's death knoll.

 

To use Parallels Access you need to install a client either on OS X or on Windows so in either case traversing ActiveDirectory is not an issue because the apps are running ON the Mac or PC not on the iPad. Parallels Access works very similar but not the same as Citrix. It's a great step in the right directory.

 

 

Also to those complaining about the subscription might I remind you that Parallels has lately been releasing a new version of Parallels Desktop each year costing around $80 US for the full version anyway? Yes the upgrade price is only $50 US but the idea that you won't pay a subscription but you'd pay yearly for a new version seems kind of... not well thought out to be honest.

post #62 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryn Lowe View Post

Actually traversing ActiveDirectory is relatively easy if only a little different. This is because Windows still insists on using drive names like A B C D E... whereas UNIX based systems like OS X don't. Mapping drives is dead easy on OS X and remapping them is just as easy using Login Items in the preference pane.

Sounds like you have a lot of experience with using Macs on corporate networks. I seem to get a lot of problems where I can see the mapped drive but it won't accept my credentials. Some drives work and others not, but it is not consistent. One day I have access the next day I don't. If I use a Windows machine I never need a password as my original network login gets propagated across the entire network through Active Directory and I have access to everything. I'm not sure what the issue is so if I encounter that problem I just switch to the PC and copy what I need into a folder I do have access to on a Mac. I don't dare ask IT for assistance.

 

Where is the Login Items Preference?


Edited by mstone - 8/28/13 at 2:10pm

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post #63 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Sounds like you have a lot of experience with using Macs on corporate networks. I seem to get a lot of problems where I can see the mapped drive but it won't accept my credentials. Some drives work and others not, but it is not consistent. One day I have access the next day I don't. If I use a Windows machine I never need a password as my original network login gets propagated across the entire network through Active Directory and I have access to everything. I'm not sure what the issue is so if I encounter that problem I just switch to the PC and copy what I need into a folder I do have access to on a Mac. I don't dare ask IT for assistance.

 

Where is the Login Items Preference?

This is where the AppleScript comes in more useful. With it you can define the domain name, username and passwords. Depending on how the ActiveDirectory is setup, when you map a drive from Finder you may get away with just using the username or you may have to use domain\username format.

 

It's easier if the Mac has been added to the ActiveDirectory than if not.

 

That being said I wrote a tutorial on how to do this many moons ago. If you PM me I can link it for you.

post #64 of 69
I tried it on XP and it seems to work too...

A little bit buggy, but worth a try.

It's amazing how needing one or two windows programmes makes you have to keep using an old pc and means you can't just leave it all behind.

I guess even the companies who don't want to programme for iPad etc and want to stay on Windows will have to make the move at some stage or risk dying off.
post #65 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Well that is not how this app works. It is not cloud based. You download it. Same with Adobe CS, the app is on your machine. It works the same as any other native application except you have to pay for it either annually or monthly just like your cable TV, your cell phone service, your car insurance, your mortgage, your health insurance, income taxes, just about every other modern service that is important. Usually the only apps that would be subscription based are going to be very valuable to business users. It is a profitability/productivity equation. For the most part, casual home users are not the target audience.

 

Also, in response to your complaint about web apps updating without notice: That can be a good thing if there is a security issue or a bug, it can be fixed immediately for everyone. Redesigning the interface may not always be welcome but...

 

 

Yeah security issues were caused by MS, they created entire industry around it due to their hack programming skills. Trust me I do not need security updates since I do not allow my computer to play in places which are infected. Also is the apps are on my computer it should not be messing around on the Internet itself (I block all apps from communicating over the Internet) However, my company seem all too intent in taking over my computer ever few weeks to installed new security update only to have the update cause all sorts of problems. Again I do not need someone else making decision on whether to update my software, it very intrusive to say the least.

post #66 of 69

Okay so I now have the Parallels with Parallels Access. Was able to get it as an upgrade for $49. What a steal! As a person who works in IT I think its absolutely awesome! You can not only control your Mac running Windows on Parallels, but OS X itself. It still stream video and audio as well. I only tried it at home, but once we purchase this where I work I'll be sure to try this feature out on one of our iPads. 

post #67 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress0660 View Post
 

Okay so I now have the Parallels with Parallels Access. Was able to get it as an upgrade for $49. What a steal! As a person who works in IT I think its absolutely awesome! You can not only control your Mac running Windows on Parallels, but OS X itself. It still stream video and audio as well. I only tried it at home, but once we purchase this where I work I'll be sure to try this feature out on one of our iPads. 

 

You're telling me, there's a way to BUY Parallels Access for a ONE TIME fee, rather than by subscribing to it on a monthly basis?

Where? How? I have no problem with dishing out $49, or for that $99 *ONCE* if the product works well, but I have a HUGE problem if yet another company tries to sucker me into the subscription scheme scam; even more so after what keeps being revealed about how the NSA works together with corporations to weaken security and put backdoors in products. I don't need the "backdoor of the month" installed on my computers by means of software subscriptions.

post #68 of 69

I'm not sure about the subscription part. Mine came with a free trial of Parallels Access until February. Considering this is an add-on to the software and the usefulness of it, I think you'll see a lot of people signing up for Parallels Access. If you're the type of person who only uses parallels every once in a while then its not worth paying the money for it. 

post #69 of 69

I'm very disappointed with Parallels Access. I had hoped to be able to use my drawing and animating programs while travelling, but the Adobe programs won't open files or create new ones. All I can do is word process, and it's much easier with Word on my iPad. I suppose it's nice that if I've left a file at home I can open it and save it to my computer. But this is not smooth, and it's nothing I'd be happy to pay for. Maybe verison 2 will live up to expectation.s

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