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Apple's iPhone holds 40% share of US smartphone market

post #1 of 35
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The iPhone has kept Apple in the number one spot among manufacturers for the U.S. smartphone market yet again, with Apple's bestselling device actually growing its share from the previous quarter.



The newest figures from comScore MobiLens and Mobile Matrix show Apple with a 40.4 percent share of U.S. smartphone subscribers for the three months ending July 2013. That figure is up 1.2 percent from Apple's share in the three months ending April 2013.

Samsung saw its share grow 2.1 points in the three months, but the South Korean conglomerate remained a distant second to Apple among manufacturers. In third and fourth place, HTC and Motorola both lost share, dropping to eight and 6.9 percent, respectively. In fifth place, HTC saw its share tick up just one-tenth of one point to 6.8 percent.

Overall, Google's Android platform remains the most popular operating system in the United States, with 51.8 percent share of the market. That figure, though, is down 0.2 points from April, while Apple's share rose 1.2 points. As Apple is the sole provider of both the iPhone and the iOS platform that powers it, its 40.4 percent share as a manufacturer is identical to iOS' share among mobile platforms.



The ever-struggling BlackBerry saw its share continuing to drop, shedding almost a full point to end July with 4.3 percent of the smartphone market. Microsoft's Windows Phone platform, though boosted by improving sales of Nokia's Lumia line, remained steady at three percent share for the three months.

comScore's latest figures are in the same line as previous studies by other industry analysts. Those examinations have found Apple picking up steam in the U.S. market, with Android maintaining the majority but slipping all the while. Together, the two platforms account for more than nine out of ten smartphones shipped worldwide.
post #2 of 35

No, it doesn't. It holds roughly 10%. The newspapers told me so, because Android is shipping more. The newspapers can't possibly be lying.

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post #3 of 35

How about Nokia? Would prefer to see HTC growing instead of Samsung :(

 

Will be interesting to see the US and worldwide numbers over the next couple quarters (although I don't have any skin in the game).

post #4 of 35
This is pretty impressive when you consider the S4 and the HTC One were both introduced in this quarter.
post #5 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

No, it doesn't. It holds roughly 10%. The newspapers told me so, because Android is shipping more. The newspapers can't possibly be lying.

What did your research tell you?
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post #6 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheUnfetteredMind View Post

How about Nokia? Would prefer to see HTC growing instead of Samsung 1frown.gif

Will be interesting to see the US and worldwide numbers over the next couple quarters (although I don't have any skin in the game).

I too was hoping for better numbers from HTC but I guess people aren't really all that impressed with build quality.
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post #7 of 35
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post
What did your research tell you?

 

40%. Possibly even a little more.

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post #8 of 35

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 90

 

 

Split Android into the following and it's not so impressive: Jelly Bean 33%, Ice Cream Sandwich 25.6% and Gingerbread is at 36.5%. Android 2.2 Froyo still has a sliver of the platform. iOS on the other hand has 93% of the users on iOS 6.

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post #9 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


I too was hoping for better numbers from HTC but I guess people aren't really all that impressed with build quality.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

40%. Possibly even a little more.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


I too was hoping for better numbers from HTC but I guess people aren't really all that impressed with build quality.

I suspect the HTC One would be a bigger seller if it wasn't for the OS.  I currently use a factory unlocked iPhone 4S (a flip Razr before that), but I think the One is a very sleek phone.  I could see myself owning one, but I'm just not crazy about Android.  I've used an iPhone, the Galaxy S3 and a Nokia Lumia 520.  I would pick the Lumia over the One only because of the OS.  

 

That One though, oh so pretty.  Also, the speakers on the front - why has Apple not done this?  Makes complete sense.

post #10 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by GadgetCanadaV2 View Post

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 90



Split Android into the following and it's not so impressive: Jelly Bean 33%, Ice Cream Sandwich 25.6% and Gingerbread is at 36.5%. Android 2.2 Froyo still has a sliver of the platform. iOS on the other hand has 93% of the users on iOS 6.

It's no longer the problem that it seems to be.

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2013/09/balky-carriers-and-slow-oems-step-aside-google-is-defragging-android/
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post #11 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by GadgetCanadaV2 View Post

 

Split Android into the following and it's not so impressive: Jelly Bean 33%, Ice Cream Sandwich 25.6% and Gingerbread is at 36.5%. Android 2.2 Froyo still has a sliver of the platform. iOS on the other hand has 93% of the users on iOS 6.

 

I still shake my head every time I hear these silly, childish software names.

 

Reminds me of Hello Kitty, for some reason. (Perhaps it's their newest one, Kit Kat, that rings that bell).

post #12 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by GadgetCanadaV2 View Post
 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 90

 

 

Split Android into the following and it's not so impressive: Jelly Bean 33%, Ice Cream Sandwich 25.6% and Gingerbread is at 36.5%. Android 2.2 Froyo still has a sliver of the platform. iOS on the other hand has 93% of the users on iOS 6.

 

I don't know ... Either camp can find stats to crow about. Let's just be happy that, as customers, we have choice, and good ones at that.

post #13 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by ndirishfan1975 View Post

This is pretty impressive when you consider the S4 and the HTC One were both introduced in this quarter.

Good point. Has Samsung or HTC given any sales number lately? Or do we still have to rely on analysts' estimates?

There was a lot of hoopla when when the HTC One came out... but clearly it didn't move the needle too much in the US.

And it gets even worse around the world. Last quarter, for instance, there were 180 million Android smartphones sold. How many of them were these well-known flagships?

Tech blogs only talk about a few certain models... Galaxy S4, HTC One, Moto X, Nexus 4, etc... but overall those models make up a small percentage of total Android sales.
post #14 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by muadibe View Post


I suspect the HTC One would be a bigger seller if it wasn't for the OS.  I currently use a factory unlocked iPhone 4S (a flip Razr before that), but I think the One is a very sleek phone.  I could see myself owning one, but I'm just not crazy about Android.  I've used an iPhone, the Galaxy S3 and a Nokia Lumia 520.  I would pick the Lumia over the One only because of the OS.  

That One though, oh so pretty.  Also, the speakers on the front - why has Apple not done this?  Makes complete sense.

Ok but then how would you explain the number of sales of Samsung devices running the very same OS? It's very late in the game for HTC to come up with yet another platform and confuse consumers even more.
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post #15 of 35
News like this makes me even more paranoid about the seriousness of the mainstrean news organizations, with these particular examples: The HuffingtonPost, The Guardian and the BBC.
Those three ignore any information that points against their talking points - Apple Is Dead Already.
post #16 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


It's no longer the problem that it seems to be.

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2013/09/balky-carriers-and-slow-oems-step-aside-google-is-defragging-android/

 

This only affects Google apps and services. 3rd party developers still have to deal with fragmentation of APIs between Android versions (+hardware variations) which is the really important thing here when it comes to the app ecosystem.

 

Ultimately raw market share numbers don't mean a thing for consumers. It only matters in the way it affects app and accessory support, for which iOS is still superior despite its smaller marketshare.

 

Cheap crippled phones running old versions of Android should be counted separately, as they do little to improve the Android ecosystem as they are mostly used as feature phones.

post #17 of 35
60% to go!

GROWTH!
post #18 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ochyming View Post

News like this makes me even more paranoid about the seriousness of the mainstrean news organizations, with these particular examples: The HuffingtonPost, The Guardian and the BBC.
Those three ignore any information that points against their talking points - Apple Is Dead Already.

People disregard all types of stuff, we all practice 'positive self deception' and it's quite normal, so imagine if we lie to ourselves how easy is it to lie to others or better yet to tell them our truth.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #19 of 35
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

In third and fourth place, HTC and Motorola both lost share, dropping to eight and 6.9 percent, respectively. In fifth place, HTC saw its share tick up just one-tenth of one point to 6.8 percent.

 

Will be fun to watch them struggle for survival over the next year or two.  (In the mobile space, that is.)

Motorola might win.  Google has blown too much money on Moto to give up easily.

Then again, there's nothing preventing Google from selling off Moto, if they can find a bigger sucker.

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post #20 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by VL-Tone View Post

This only affects Google apps and services. 3rd party developers still have to deal with fragmentation of APIs between Android versions (+hardware variations) which is the really important thing here when it comes to the app ecosystem.

Ultimately raw market share numbers don't mean a thing for consumers. It only matters in the way it affects app and accessory support, for which iOS is still superior despite its smaller marketshare.

Cheap crippled phones running old versions of Android should be counted separately, as they do little to improve the Android ecosystem as they are mostly used as feature phones.

Not true, developers can write apps that look, feel and function like they were written for the latest version of Android but have them run on legacy versions of Android.
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"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #21 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post



People disregard all types of stuff, we all practice 'positive self deception' and it's quite normal, so imagine if we lie to ourselves how easy is it to lie to others or better yet to tell them our truth.

 



Indeed!

Perhaps it is the market share mindset at work.
May help sell ads.

Well, i see the same lack of seriousness regarding politics, why not tech.
post #22 of 35
HTC seems like its more impressive than most think, being in third and fifth place at the same time!
post #23 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

It's no longer the problem that it seems to be.

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2013/09/balky-carriers-and-slow-oems-step-aside-google-is-defragging-android/

Yes, that's what Google wants people to believe.

But, in reality, the latest versions still constitute a minority and there are still phones being sold running Android 2.x.

While you can run SOME apps on older versions of Android. there are not - and will never be - bug fixes or security fixes for the older versions and that's a serious problem that Google wants you to ignore.
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post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Yes, that's what Google wants people to believe.

But, in reality, the latest versions still constitute a minority and there are still phones being sold running Android 2.x.

While you can run SOME apps on older versions of Android. there are not - and will never be - bug fixes or security fixes for the older versions and that's a serious problem that Google wants you to ignore.

Agreed, but those are a whole other set of issues some of which Google has no control over. If manufacturers are putting Android 2.x.x then any issues with the device is one that they bought onto themselves.
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post #25 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

No, it doesn't. It holds roughly 10%. The newspapers told me so, because Android is shipping more. The newspapers can't possibly be lying.

Your inability to understand the newspapers simply illustrates why you don't mind using spyware android !

post #26 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Agreed, but those are a whole other set of issues some of which Google has no control over. If manufacturers are putting Android 2.x.x then any issues with the device is one that they bought onto themselves.

No one cares who you want to blame.

The fact is that the majority of Android phones will never have security upgrades available.
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post #27 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

No one cares who you want to blame.

The fact is that the majority of Android phones will never have security upgrades available.

Not entirely accurate JR,

It looks like Google is also decoupling some of the security enhancements from the OS too. A few months back Android 4.2 introduced a new service called Verify Apps, a client-side security feature that scans apps for malware as they're being installed, even side-loaded ones not coming directly from Google Play.

It's now no longer a part of the OS and instead baked into Google Play Services. By doing that every official Android device running 2.3 or higher which covers 95% of active users, now has Verify Apps helping protect them from most of the identified malware that might be targeting Android devices thru installed apps. Google's not leaving it up to just the OEM's and carriers to get new security features out, a refreshing change.

I think even Marvin will give Google props for thinking outside the box on this one.
http://blogs.computerworld.com/android/22552/google-android-security
Edited by Gatorguy - 9/6/13 at 8:24pm
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post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by GadgetCanadaV2 View Post
 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 90

 

 

Split Android into the following and it's not so impressive: Jelly Bean 33%, Ice Cream Sandwich 25.6% and Gingerbread is at 36.5%. Android 2.2 Froyo still has a sliver of the platform. iOS on the other hand has 93% of the users on iOS 6.

 

Froyo
Gingerbread

H....

Ice Cream Sandwich

Jelly Bean

KitKat

 

Where's the H!?? Or what is it?

post #29 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueeddie View Post

Froyo
Gingerbread
H....
Ice Cream Sandwich
Jelly Bean
KitKat

Where's the H!?? Or what is it?

Honeycomb
post #30 of 35

oops. sorry im stupid.

post #31 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

No one cares who you want to blame.

The fact is that the majority of Android phones will never have security upgrades available.

The security updates are there. It's up to the manufacturers to update the phone. Anyone concerned with getting updates in a timely fashion has a Nexus device.

http://www.androidcentral.com/motorola-droid-x-receiving-security-update
Edited by dasanman69 - 9/7/13 at 5:12am
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post #32 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

The security updates are there. It's up to the manufacturers to update the phone. Anyone concerned with getting updates in a timely fashion has a Nexus device.

http://www.androidcentral.com/motorola-droid-x-receiving-security-update

Since it bears repeating Google has also taken things into their own hands and reportedly made 95% of all active Google Android devices more secure. Read up on Verify Apps, an Android 4.2 feature that's now been made a part of Google Play Services instead. The tiny chance that any Android device was going to be infected by a malicious likely took a nosedive, even those that throw caution to the wind and install any old app from anywhere as long as it's free.1hmm.gif
http://blogs.computerworld.com/android/22552/google-android-security
Edited by Gatorguy - 9/7/13 at 6:24am
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post #33 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Not entirely accurate JR,

It looks like Google is also decoupling some of the security enhancements from the OS too. A few months back Android 4.2 introduced a new service called Verify Apps, a client-side security feature that scans apps for malware as they're being installed, even side-loaded ones not coming directly from Google Play.

It's now no longer a part of the OS and instead baked into Google Play Services. By doing that every official Android device running 2.3 or higher which covers 95% of active users, now has Verify Apps helping protect them from most of the identified malware that might be targeting Android devices thru installed apps. Google's not leaving it up to just the OEM's and carriers to get new security features out, a refreshing change.

I think even Marvin will give Google props for thinking outside the box on this one.
http://blogs.computerworld.com/android/22552/google-android-security

So your solution is that if you have an insecure OS, you add layers of applications on top of it? Sorry, but that doesn't fix security problems.

Which is better an OS that is secure (and can easily be updated when new security patches are needed) or an OS that is insecure and has an app placed on top of it - and the OS can not be updated?

Obviously, the former. Adding layers of apps to try to catch security problems is not a real solution. Not to mention what it does to system responsiveness, of course.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

The security updates are there. It's up to the manufacturers to update the phone. Anyone concerned with getting updates in a timely fashion has a Nexus device.

http://www.androidcentral.com/motorola-droid-x-receiving-security-update

Again, no one cares who you want to blame. The fact is that the overwhelming majority of Android users will never be able to get security updates for their phones.
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post #34 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Since it bears repeating Google has also taken things into their own hands and reportedly made 95% of all active Google Android devices more secure. Read up on Verify Apps, an Android 4.2 feature that's now been made a part of Google Play Services instead. The tiny chance that any Android device was going to be infected by a malicious likely took a nosedive, even those that throw caution to the wind and install any old app from anywhere as long as it's free.1hmm.gif
http://blogs.computerworld.com/android/22552/google-android-security

Silly.

So Windows was more secure than Mac OS - because it had lots of antivirus software? Surely even you realize how ridiculous your argument is. Adding a layer of software on top of the system does NOT fix security problems.
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post #35 of 35
Jragosta, you claimed most Android users would never see security upgrades. 95% of them just have so you were wrong simply and plainly. Google Play Services is baked potato into Google Android just as Apple Maps are baked into iOS. It's not another software layer or some 3rd party antivirus being added as you should easily recognize. Google Play Services was already there.
Edited by Gatorguy - 9/8/13 at 1:05pm
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