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Smartphones now account for 56% of US market, Apple's iPhone at 25% share

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
Smartphones are now the predominant type of cellular phone in the United States, accounting for more than half according to a new poll, while Apple's iPhone leads all other devices among smartphone owners.



For the first time since the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project began tracking smartphone penetration, that device category has achieved a majority share among American cell phone owners. As of May 2013, 56 percent of cell phone-owning American adults own a smartphone, up from nearly 10 points from February 2012 and more than 20 points from May of 2011. Commensurate with the smartphone's rise has been the a decline in the number of adults who own a different sort of cell phone or no cell phone, now down to 35 and nine percent, respectively.

Just as the smartphone has taken center stage among cell phones, Apple's iPhone has taken center stage among smartphones. Pew's poll found that fully 25 percent of cell phone owners said their device was an iPhone. That figure was up from 19 percent in February 2012 and 10 percent in May 2011.

Pew's figures largely align with other U.S. smartphone market figures. Those have found Apple with a large and growing share of the American smartphone market as well. As is the case with other analyses, Pew's study found that the iPhone's growth has largely come at the expense of second-tier platforms such as BlackBerry and, to an extent, Microsoft's Windows Phone operating system. Devices running Google's Android operating system accounted for 28 percent of American cell phones.

The study also found a number of demographic trends surrounding iPhone ownership. Owners of Apple's smartphone tended to be on the higher end of the income and education spectrum. Thirty-eight percent of respondents who had completed at least four years of college owned an iPhone, versus 29 percent for Android-powered phones.

With regard to income, Pew's study found that households bringing in more money tended to have more iPhone users. Twenty-five percent of respondents from households making between $50,000 and $75,000 said they were iPhone users, and 40 percent of respondents pulling in $75,000 or more owned iPhones. Nearly half (49 percent) of cell phone-owning respondents with a household income of $150,000 or more were iPhone users.
post #2 of 35

So ~half of all smartphones are iPhones. But but but but Android just shipped 80% of all smartphones!

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #3 of 35
Once again the big loser here is Windows phone. That entire project is in serious need of a reset. As it stands today it's a complete flop.
post #4 of 35

The graph says why iPhone 5C is needed. At least 5C should stop the cheap junk Android mobile from taking the  market share!  

 

But... But... But... Apple should not have made cheaper phone! its not its way.

post #5 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

So ~half of all smartphones are iPhones. But but but but Android just shipped 80% of all smartphones!

According to the study well-to-do urban whites, those making $150K or more, are the group most likely to use an iPhone. Poor African-Americans are in the group most likely to use an Android smartphone. Further, there's little difference in Android use across income categories unlike iPhone owners which isn't what some might expect. An affluent Android using individual is reportedly as likely to have one as someone making 40K a year. To me that might indicate that it's not necessarily uneducated poor people reluctantly buying Android as much as something else. That "something else" is perhaps the iPhone being considered a symbol of status for the wealthy white males IMHO.
http://www.pewinternet.org/~/media//Files/Reports/2013/PIP_Smartphone_adoption_2013.pdf

I started a conversation with another member here a couple days ago about this report. He was right that AI would get around to writing up an article about it within a few days.
Edited by Gatorguy - 9/9/13 at 9:59am
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post #6 of 35
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
perhaps the iPhone being considered a symbol of status for the wealthy white males

 

Obviously untrue, of course.

 
…H…

 

Whoever said these guys couldn't tell jokes…

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #7 of 35
Three days ago, AppleInsider had iPhone at 40% of the US smartphone market, with Android declining. It might be nice if you tried to relate one thing you say to the next.
post #8 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Obviously untrue, of course.

Whoever said these guys couldn't tell jokes…

I love how, in response to a report that the iPhone makes up 25% of ALL cellphones (not just smartphones) the response is "rich" (and I use that term loosely. $150K is not exactly "rich" - no matter what our government and media (all of who make more than that) try to convince us of) white men are why. Please. These rich white men can't be the 1% AND make up 25% at the same time. (Ok, technically it is possible, but there are far more non rich people with a cellphone, so my point is still valid).

Sorry for the political rant.
post #9 of 35

Remember when Steve Jobs said that Apple was hoping to get 1% of the cellphone market in the first year of the iPhone? Some people didn't even think it was possible given the size of the market. Now they have 25x that.

post #10 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by NormM View Post

Three days ago, AppleInsider had iPhone at 40% of the US smartphone market, with Android declining. It might be nice if you tried to relate one thing you say to the next.

 

Appleinsider says nothing (well, other than DED's screeds on the omnipotence of Apple), it just repeats what others are saying.

 

And, if you do the math they have 44% based on the above data.  Given the likely differences in measuring, this is within the margins of error.

post #11 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chandra69 View Post
 

The graph says why iPhone 5C is needed. At least 5C should stop the cheap junk Android mobile from taking the  market share!  

 

But... But... But... Apple should not have made cheaper phone! its not its way.

 

Well, that last 44% of the market is made up of people who don't/can't use smart phone features or afford a subsidized plan.  Makes no sense for them to move off of a $100 or cheaper feature phone on a prepaid plan onto a $625 iPhone or a commitment to spend 2400 over 2 years....

 

When most US households have less than $60,000[2010] in income and 3 mouths to feed.... having a computer in your pocket isn't the highest priority.   

 

Now the question is, if you can sell a phone that is $350 in the US, how much market will you get.   Will you get a vast majority of the $100K-$149K households (~12% of US households) of the who were quite miserly in the past?. 

 

Note: the fact that Apple being in 1/2 of the 150K households...  sounds big, but in reality... that's only nets 5% of the households in the US.

post #12 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


According to the study well-to-do urban whites, those making $150K or more, are the group most likely to use an iPhone. Poor African-Americans are in the group most likely to use an Android smartphone. Further, there's little difference in Android use across income categories unlike iPhone owners which isn't what some might expect. An affluent Android using individual is reportedly as likely to have one as someone making 40K a year. To me that might indicate that it's not necessarily uneducated poor people reluctantly buying Android as much as something else. That "something else" is perhaps the iPhone being considered a symbol of status for the wealthy white males IMHO.
http://www.pewinternet.org/~/media//Files/Reports/2013/PIP_Smartphone_adoption_2013.pdf
 

 

 

Pew reports are fantastic. You can't argue with their data. Their methods are included right in the reports, something that is missed in summaries like this story in AI. And unfortunately it's too easy to jump to conclusions without the full report.

 

I'm glad you're using the word "perhaps". I hope no one glosses over that. There may be a variety of factors here including (or instead of) the fact that it's considered a status symbol. There's no reasons (but there is a little speculation) in this report.

post #13 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by starbird73 View Post


I love how, in response to a report that the iPhone makes up 25% of ALL cellphones (not just smartphones) the response is "rich" (and I use that term loosely. $150K is not exactly "rich" - no matter what our government and media (all of who make more than that) try to convince us of) white men are why. Please. These rich white men can't be the 1% AND make up 25% at the same time. (Ok, technically it is possible, but there are far more non rich people with a cellphone, so my point is still valid).

Sorry for the political rant.

 

150K is not 'rich' but it's significant in that 150K is the top Quintile of income in the US. in other words, you may not be rich, but you make more than 80% of the rest of the households in the US.  AND if you look at the stats, your households are larger (you don't buy 1 iPhone... you buy 3)

 

There a a lot of non-rich people with a cell phone.  what this is alluding to is most with a 'SMARTPHONE'  well above the median household income.  and MOST with a iPhone are above the 80% line.

 

I don't feel this is a 1% issue (the 250K household income the 97.5 level),  but the Pew Foundation (from what I see they are focused on income disparities in the US) is pointing out [the obvious fact] that it requires a lot of income [and/or a lifestyle accustomed to Internet connectivity] to justify a smartphone in the US market right now.

 

What I read is:  You need an income of almost 50K a year to afford an iPhone.  (65% of all iPhones are sold to households with more than 50K... without the details, my assumption is that there is a floor (40K? 35K?) where a single person's salary really can't justify a $625 phone or a $2400 2 year spend on a phone.

 

My question relating to apple's strategy is:  What is apple's 'affordability' quotient for the new iPhone 5c (or whatever is the lowest price unsubbed phone).   Will it make it 'affordable' for a $40K salary person and looking at demographics, that's 10% of the population.  Extending the 25% market capture down to that 10% of the population is another million in phone sales (500K a year assuming the classic 2 year lifecycle), and again, getting them into the Apple Ecosystem.

post #14 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawson100 View Post
 

 

 

Pew reports are fantastic. You can't argue with their data. Their methods are included right in the reports, something that is missed in summaries like this story in AI. And unfortunately it's too easy to jump to conclusions without the full report.

 

I'm glad you're using the word "perhaps". I hope no one glosses over that. There may be a variety of factors here including (or instead of) the fact that it's considered a status symbol. There's no reasons (but there is a little speculation) in this report.

 

There a lot of factors for the purchase decision... But what we are seeing is

 

- people kicking the tires on a smart phone choose on price

- people learning what they need after their first smartphone buy Apple.

- Apple's smartphone functionality is attractive and retains value (why are 80% of smartphone activations are Android, but 44% of 'active' smartphone users us Apple... Because apple phones are regifted, and Androids thrown away... zero retained value).

- Apple needs to make sure for the vast majority, 'their next smartphone' has an iPhone in their price range, as it appears that at higher disposable incomes - push that 'base' affordability down, and you open yourself up to more 'switchers.'

post #15 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawson100 View Post


I'm glad you're using the word "perhaps". I hope no one glosses over that.

No doubt someone will. I won't be surprised if mein Schatten chimes in.
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post #16 of 35

The report basically provides solid empirical support for what many of us have been saying here for a while now: iPhone users are more educated, more affluent, and unsurprisingly, (given its association with education and income) more white.

 

That said, I would actually have thought that it would be even more skewed in those three dimensions than is indicated by the Pew study (whose research, to echo someone else's comment, is absolutely first-rate; especially compared to the tripe put out by the various consulting firms).

post #17 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post
 

Note: the fact that Apple being in 1/2 of the 150K households...  sounds big, but in reality... that's only nets 5% of the households in the US.

'Households' tend to have more than one phone, typically 2 to 3: that alone would make the share in $150K+ households 10% - 15% right there.

post #18 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by VL-Tone View Post
 

Remember when Steve Jobs said that Apple was hoping to get 1% of the cellphone market in the first year of the iPhone? Some people didn't even think it was possible given the size of the market. Now they have 25x that.

 

No, Steve's 1% target was the global cellphone market. These figures are US only.

post #19 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post
 

 

There a lot of factors for the purchase decision... But what we are seeing is

...

- Apple's smartphone functionality is attractive and retains value (why are 80% of smartphone activations are Android, but 44% of 'active' smartphone users us Apple... Because apple phones are regifted, and Androids thrown away... zero retained value).

...

 

Maybe Android phones are tossed after use and on to the next one.  Maybe they break more often and get replaced which equals an activation.

 

For sure that iPhones are passed down from user to user once someone upgrades.  It is time for me to upgrade and my daughter who will be a first time user would like my 3GS for calling and texting.  It still works and is a good phone after 3 1/2 years of use.

post #20 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

So ~half of all smartphones are iPhones. But but but but Android just shipped 80% of all smartphones!

 

You are right on both counts.  Apple has less than half of the market share in its best market by far- the US market.  In many other countries Apple has single digit or low double digit market share- so yes on the global front Android is selling far more units and the 80% number you give is probably about right.

post #21 of 35
I predict the iPhone 5C will have the most monumental impact on worldwide market share of any iPhone yet. "New" is a powerful thing, even if the handset is loaded with last year's components. It's still a massive boost to the feature set of the iPhone 4S that would otherwise occupy the same slot in the lineup.
post #22 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


According to the study well-to-do urban whites, those making $150K or more, are the group most likely to use an iPhone. Poor African-Americans are in the group most likely to use an Android smartphone. Further, there's little difference in Android use across income categories unlike iPhone owners which isn't what some might expect. An affluent Android using individual is reportedly as likely to have one as someone making 40K a year. To me that might indicate that it's not necessarily uneducated poor people reluctantly buying Android as much as something else. That "something else" is perhaps the iPhone being considered a symbol of status for the wealthy white males IMHO.
http://www.pewinternet.org/~/media//Files/Reports/2013/PIP_Smartphone_adoption_2013.pdf

I started a conversation with another member here a couple days ago about this report. He was right that AI would get around to writing up an article about it within a few days.

 

That's funny because I live near a very large African-Amercian community, in fact the next largest after Harlem (around St. Louis. MO). Most of that demographic I see in the shopping malls are carrying iPhones, not Android. And I think your comment about wealthy white males is about as condescending and bigoted as it gets for a troll. Yet more FUD to somehow try and diminish the popularity of Apple's products with users from all demographics. 

post #23 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

That's funny because I live near a very large African-Amercian community, in fact the next largest after Harlem (around St. Louis. MO). Most of that demographic I see in the shopping malls are carrying iPhones, not Android. And I think your comment about wealthy white males is about as condescending and bigoted as it gets for a troll. Yet more FUD to somehow try and diminish the popularity of Apple's products with users from all demographics. 

In all fairness, he's only reporting what the Pew study says.

 

You should at least check it out before calling someone 'bigoted'. You can't make statistical generalizations based on your individual experience. As noted, Pew studies are quite carefully done.

post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

That's funny because I live near a very large African-Amercian community, in fact the next largest after Harlem (around St. Louis. MO). Most of that demographic I see in the shopping malls are carrying iPhones, not Android. And I think your comment about wealthy white males is about as condescending and bigoted as it gets for a troll. Yet more FUD to somehow try and diminish the popularity of Apple's products with users from all demographics. 

Quoting from the Pew Report for your benefit since you obviously weren't going to be bothered reading the link I gave to it before accusing me of bigotry and making stuff up.

"Cell phone owners from a wide range of
educational and household income groupings have similar levels of Android adoption, but those from
the upper end of the income and education spectrum are much more likely than those with lower
income and educational levels to say they own an iPhone. Indeed, fully half—49%—of cell owners with a
household income of $150,000 or more say their phone is an iPhone. And African-American cell owners
are more likely than whites or Latinos to say that their phone is an Android device as opposed to an
iPhone."


Lots of demographic charts in that report's 12 pages too broken down by education, race, and income if your're at all interested. The claims weren't my invention.

...and thanks Anant
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post #25 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by NormM View Post

Three days ago, AppleInsider had iPhone at 40% of the US smartphone market, with Android declining. It might be nice if you tried to relate one thing you say to the next.
And what they said was in fact correct. Looking at just smart phones apple has 43% of the us market compared to android at 52%. So when saying that smart phones comprise 56% of the entire phone market (dumb and smart phones) 25% of all phones would be about right.
post #26 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

That's funny because I live near a very large African-Amercian community, in fact the next largest after Harlem (around St. Louis. MO). Most of that demographic I see in the shopping malls are carrying iPhones, not Android. And I think your comment about wealthy white males is about as condescending and bigoted as it gets for a troll. Yet more FUD to somehow try and diminish the popularity of Apple's products with users from all demographics. 

Quoting from the Pew Report for your benefit since you obviously weren't going to be bothered reading the link I gave to it before accusing me of bigotry and making stuff up.

"Cell phone owners from a wide range of
educational and household income groupings have similar levels of Android adoption, but those from
the upper end of the income and education spectrum are much more likely than those with lower
income and educational levels to say they own an iPhone. Indeed, fully half—49%—of cell owners with a
household income of $150,000 or more say their phone is an iPhone. And African-American cell owners
are more likely than whites or Latinos to say that their phone is an Android device as opposed to an
iPhone."


Lots of demographic charts in that report's 12 pages too broken down by education, race, and income if your're at all interested. The claims weren't my invention.

...and thanks Anant

That doesn't say what you said. Putting aside the fact it doesn't say what size of the market the highest wealth brackets represent, the gender breakdown for men is higher with Android; with white people, it's evenly split. $50-75k is a fairly well-off household as far as smartphone ownership goes and again higher numbers for Android. Your conclusion of the iPhone being a status symbol for rich white men is totally unjustified and derogatory. This is an example of the propaganda I described a short time ago - selective picking of facts in order to push forward your offensive opinions.

Android devices start at lower price points and it so happens that more black people are less affluent so there's obviously going to be more people at a lower earning threshold buying Android devices. Similarly, iPhones are better quality products so people at the higher earning scales want the best quality on the market. Both women and men are roughly equally likely to have one or the other, same with white people. The only differentiating factor is income and impacts the black community more, which shows up in that ethnicity bracket. And that still doesn't mean the iPhone is a product for the wealthy because it doesn't break down what portion of the overall market the upper income tiers represent.
post #27 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Once again the big loser here is Windows phone. That entire project is in serious need of a reset. As it stands today it's a complete flop.

Like a fish out of water, the MSFT WP has a couple of good flops left in it... I understand Uncle Fester wants to release an RT version of WIndows 8 phones before they bum rush him out of the building... It will be like other smart phones but will lack apps and email.

With all apologies to Southpark, it will be called the Kenny phone.
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

The report basically provides solid empirical support for what many of us have been saying here for a while now: iPhone users are more educated, more affluent, and unsurprisingly, (given its association with education and income) more white.

iPhone users have three-digit IQs, while some Android users brag about having two-digit IQs and both of their front teeth.
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #29 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by deepen03 View Post

"while Apple's iPhone leads all other devices among smartphone owners."

yet ANDROID DEVICES HAVE A HIGHER MARKET SHARE.. more BS from AppleInsider

 

Android is not a "device".

post #30 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

That doesn't say what you said. Putting aside the fact it doesn't say what size of the market the highest wealth brackets represent, the gender breakdown for men is higher with Android; with white people, it's evenly split. $50-75k is a fairly well-off household as far as smartphone ownership goes and again higher numbers for Android. Your conclusion of the iPhone being a status symbol for rich white men is totally unjustified and derogatory. This is an example of the propaganda I described a short time ago - selective picking of facts in order to push forward your offensive opinions.

Android devices start at lower price points and it so happens that more black people are less affluent so there's obviously going to be more people at a lower earning threshold buying Android devices. Similarly, iPhones are better quality products so people at the higher earning scales want the best quality on the market. Both women and men are roughly equally likely to have one or the other, same with white people. The only differentiating factor is income and impacts the black community more, which shows up in that ethnicity bracket. And that still doesn't mean the iPhone is a product for the wealthy because it doesn't break down what portion of the overall market the upper income tiers represent.

Marvin, making a guess that the iPhone may be considered a status symbol for the well-to-do should hardly be considered offensive. Other studies as well as individual experience have found the choice of smartphone to be a sign of status for many. While Android uptake stays relatively constant, varying by 6 percentage points at most across all income and education levels, iPhone use skews heavily towards the wealthier with a much higher range between the categories, up to 39 percentage points top to bottom. There are "free" and comparably-priced iPhones widely available so price would not be the determining factor IMO.

On the second point my noting the findings of the published Pew Study, to quote my first post, show that "well-to-do urban whites... are the group most likely to use an iPhone (while) Poor African-Americans are in the group most likely to use an Android smartphone". (rich white men is your choice of words not mine and yes might be considered derogatory depending on the circumstance and the facts) is neither offensive IMO nor invented. You seem to think it's made up. The Pew Study chose race as a potentially important factor and specifically pointing out that they discerned a difference worth a dedicated paragraph to emphasize the result. I personally think you're looking for an offensive post where none exists, but I'll extend an apology to you if you're offended.

EDIT: Since its being largely ignored I'll also mention that the typical characterization of Android users as uneducated and poor would not be supported by the Pew results. Android smartphone use is pointedly consistent with little variation across all income and education levels. Where the differences in relative wealth and education are most pronounced are in iPhone user categories.
Edited by Gatorguy - 9/10/13 at 6:17am
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post #31 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Marvin, making a guess that the iPhone may be considered a status symbol for the well-to-do should hardly be considered offensive.

It's offensive when you make statements that imply the business model Apple uses has an inherent class or race bias e.g Android devices are equal opportunity devices for everyone regardless of education, race or income but iPhones are primarily accessible to rich white men. If the really wealthy category of smartphone users comprises less than say 5% of the whole market then even if the iPhone had 90% of that demographic, that still doesn't mean the iPhone is a status symbol for the wealthy because wealthy people can pick whatever they want. The iPhone is a symbol of quality and people from multiple wealth categories appreciate that.

The iPhone does have a high minimum price especially off-contract but so does the XBox One. Do you think a $450 iPhone is a status symbol for the wealthy and a $499 XBox One isn't? Are you going to suggest that the $100 Android based consoles are breaking down race barriers and giving poor black people a leg up to some gaming entertainment they'd otherwise be deprived of?

The only meaningful conclusion you can draw from the study is that because Apple products have a high minimum price and there are more poor black people than white, that skews the low earning black demographic. It doesn't mean it's inaccessible to that demographic otherwise the iPhone share would be zero. The ratio of iPhone to Android in the black demographic is almost the same as the lowest earning bracket.

To even the numbers out, Apple would have to make a $100-200 smartphone and that's not what they do but it doesn't make their business model discriminatory as you are suggesting. It just makes it less appealing to low earners.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

rich white men is your choice of words not mine

If you read comment #31, I think you'll find you said "That "something else" is perhaps the iPhone being considered a symbol of status for the wealthy white males IMHO."
post #32 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

It's offensive when you make statements that imply the business model Apple uses has an inherent class or race bias e.g Android devices are equal opportunity devices for everyone regardless of education, race or income but iPhones are primarily accessible to rich white men.

How the heck do you connect the results of Pew's research to Apple's business model to make it offensive? Your "connect the dots" page is coming from an entirely different book. The study had to do with adoption of smartphones from the consumer side, not manufacturer's marketing plans.

With "free" and $49 iPhones commonly available in the US even the less-well-off can afford one just as well as they can an Android-based smartphone if that's what they really wanted.

So I'm curious how what I said differs from the Pew findings. Even this single Pew paragraph is nearly the same as what I wrote with the addition of some other Pew details from the study.

Pew: "Cell phone owners from a wide range of educational and household income groupings have similar levels of Android adoption, but those from the upper end of the income and education spectrum are much more likely than those with lower income and educational levels to say they own an iPhone. Indeed, fully half—49%—of cell owners with a household income of $150,000 or more say their phone is an iPhone. And African-American cell owners are more likely than whites or Latinos to say that their phone is an Android device as opposed to an iPhone."

My post:
"According to the study well-to-do urban whites, those making $150K or more, are the group most likely to use an iPhone. Poor African-Americans are in the group most likely to use an Android smartphone. Further, there's little difference in Android use across income categories unlike iPhone owners which isn't what some might expect. An affluent Android using individual is reportedly as likely to have one as someone making 40K a year."

If your problem is only with the much later post mentioning "wealthy white males" I'll agree that was not necessarily accurate and should also have been worded differently, just leaving it at my original "well-to-do" tho Pew does offer more specifics in it's charting extending it to "white, non-Hispanic". You've taken it farther by changing it to "rich white men" as tho it's carries the same connotation. In any event restricting the comment to male is probably inaccurate. It's just as likely 50/50 male and female if I read the charts correctly.
Edited by Gatorguy - 9/10/13 at 8:48am
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post #33 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I'm curious how what I said differs from the Pew findings.

The report itself is mildly offensive in the conclusions being drawn because it ignores the racial and educational effects on income but your wording was far worse. Take for example the stats that show that people who don't achieve a high school or college education choose Android far more than an iPhone. They worded that by saying:

"those from the upper end of the income and education spectrum are much more likely than those with lower income and educational levels to say they own an iPhone"

What you did would have been equivalent to saying:

"this just goes to show people who buy Android devices are too stupid to know any better"

and then under criticism, suggest that you're saying exactly the same thing as the study says. It's not the same thing when you word it to attack the people you don't like. You even took issue with the implied link with a lack of education and Android adoption by saying "it's not necessarily uneducated poor people reluctantly buying Android"; nobody in the thread even made that suggestion but you pre-empted it with an attack against the iPhone as being elitist.

Large parts of this paragraph are different from what the report said:

"According to the study well-to-do urban whites, those making $150K or more, are the group most likely to use an iPhone. Poor African-Americans are in the group most likely to use an Android smartphone. Further, there's little difference in Android use across income categories unlike iPhone owners which isn't what some might expect. An affluent Android using individual is reportedly as likely to have one as someone making 40K a year. To me that might indicate that it's not necessarily uneducated poor people reluctantly buying Android as much as something else. That "something else" is perhaps the iPhone being considered a symbol of status for the wealthy white males IMHO."

The report didn't in any way link location or ethnicity with wealth. The wealthiest demographic they tested could easily have been over 50% black. Same with you saying "poor African-Americans", they didn't link the two descriptions like you did. They said more African-Americans use Android and more poor people and less educated people use Android. It doesn't follow from the study that the separate demographics can be joined. It so happens that there are more poor black people than white so some links can be justified but you're merging parts of the stats to arrive at offensive remarks and claiming the study backs it up.

If you take ethnicity, gender and education out of the equation entirely, the conclusion you reach is that people who don't have much money can't afford an iPhone that starts at around $450 off-contract. That's not particularly surprising. Now add in the facts that black people make up most of the poor and it follows even without a study that more black people would prefer cheaper alternatives. Add in the fact that people with a poor education might struggle to get a good job and there you have a lack of income again. Drawing conclusions about ethnicity and education in relation to smartphone preference is offensive when it comes down to a problem of income disparity that has nothing to do with the smartphone manufacturers.
post #34 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


The report didn't in any way link location or ethnicity with wealth. The wealthiest demographic they tested could easily have been over 50% black. Same with you saying "poor African-Americans", they didn't link the two descriptions like you did. They said more African-Americans use Android and more poor people and less educated people use Android. It doesn't follow from the study that the separate demographics can be joined. It so happens that there are more poor black people than white so some links can be justified but you're merging parts of the stats to arrive at offensive remarks and claiming the study backs it up.

If you take ethnicity, gender and education out of the equation entirely, the conclusion you reach is that people who don't have much money can't afford an iPhone that starts at around $450 off-contract. That's not particularly surprising. Now add in the facts that black people make up most of the poor and it follows even without a study that more black people would prefer cheaper alternatives. Add in the fact that people with a poor education might struggle to get a good job and there you have a lack of income again. Drawing conclusions about ethnicity and education in relation to smartphone preference is offensive when it comes down to a problem of income disparity that has nothing to do with the smartphone manufacturers.

I assumed you read their methodology. On page 10 they stated that their survey was representative of the population as a whole plus or minus 2.3%. If your assertion that the results are only due to obvious poverty in the black community and have nothing to do with race as such then poverty rates in the Hispanic community would have to be much lower since they are as likely to be an iPhone owner as white non-Hispanics according to Pew findings. Wouldn't that be correct? So how do the Hispanic vs. African-American rates compare? They look just about the same to me (look them up) yet African-Americans are much less likely to buy an iPhone than Hispanics. Maybe you have an alternate explanation for the disparity.

...and no I'm not claiming it's Apple's fault so we can dispose of that one.
Edited by Gatorguy - 9/10/13 at 10:30am
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post #35 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

If your assertion that the results are only due to obvious poverty in the black community and have nothing to do with race as such then poverty rates in the Hispanic community would have to be much lower since they are as likely to be an iPhone owner as white non-Hispanics according to Pew findings. Wouldn't that be correct?

It depends on how accurately the sampling was done but it still doesn't back up your comment about the iPhone being a white status symbol when Hispanics are equally likely to own an iPhone in that study. The last Pew study showed different ratios and the conclusion there was:

http://gizmodo.com/5977625/android-is-popular-because-its-cheap-not-because-its-good

I don't think you can draw meaningful information out of these kind of things outside of the wealth brackets when there are so many factors influencing each other and basing the certainty on statistical probability that the sampling of a couple of thousand people is accurate enough to be applied to about 1.5 billion people. These kind of surveys serve more for projecting your own conclusions onto and I think everyone is clear on what your conclusions are by now.
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