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Apple's new M7 motion coprocessor to empower new breed of fitness apps

post #1 of 41
Thread Starter 
Apple's inclusion of a motion coprocessor in the iPhone 5s will likely spawn a whole new generation of intuitive, user-friendly fitness apps, and may indicate where the company's future devices and services are headed.



In unveiling the iPhone 5s, Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller pointed out the addition of a "motion coprocessor," dubbed the M7 chip, which works with the new A7 processor to handle data from the smartphone's assorted sensors. Even when the device is in sleep mode, the M7 gathers information from the gyroscope, accelerometer, compass, and other sensors to continually measure a user's activity, all with power consumption levels much lower than the A7.

"It takes advantage of all these great sensors and it continually measures them without having to wake up the A7 chip," Schiller said, noting that, even in sleep mode, the device could tell if a user is "stationary, running, walking, or driving."

The iPhone 5s will also be able to change the behavior of apps depending on the user's motion. When driving, for instance, a navigation app may be called on to provide driving directions. When the user gets out of their car and starts walking, the navigation app could switch the type of direction information appropriately, all without waking the device.

When the iPhone 5s is brought out of sleep, the M7 can feed the gathered information to a compatible fitness-oriented app. This means that apps like those supplied by Nike will be able to constantly monitor a user's activity levels with little effect on battery life.

Nike, in fact, has built the first app to take advantage of the M7 coprocessor. Schiller noted the capabilities of Nike+ Move, an app that uses the M7 just as described above. Schiller left open the possibility that future apps will also access the iPhone 5s' motion data.

Aside from detailing its capabilities, Schiller did not reveal how Apple plans to use the chip going forward. While it may may have some functionality overlap with existing health monitors like Nike's FuelBand, or the heart rate-monitoring Withings Pulse, use scenarios will likely keep the third party accessory market relevant for some time.

Schiller M7


Some observers have noted the possibility that Apple could include the M7 into the design of its suspected smart watch device, referred to by many as the "iWatch." Apple is said to have been aggressively hiring for the so-called smart watch, and rumors hold that the device will be packed with biometric sensors, much like Nike's FuelBand. A built-in motion coprocessor in such a device could have the effect of greatly differentiating Apple's rumored offering from what many think will be a crowded smart watch market.

The iPhone 5s follows quickly in the footsteps of another flagship device with a focus on motion sensing, the Moto X from Google-owned Motorola.

In revealing that device, however, Motorola did not stress the fitness applications of the built-in, low-power motion sensors. The company did, though, showcase such features as the phone automatically displaying information on its screen when it detects itself being removed from a pocket. Motorola's device can also automatically switch into camera mode when it detects it is being moved into a photo-taking position.

No such features were announced for the iPhone 5s, but Apple can conceivably add similar functionality via updates to iOS.

Apple's iPhone 5s will go on sale alongside the iPhone 5c on Sept. 20. Unlike previous launches of Apple's flagship device, as well as this year's iPhone 5c, the 5s will not have a preorder period, meaning it will only become available on the 20th at retail locations and online.
post #2 of 41
Since the 5S does no have a pre-order, wonder what the delivery date would be if I purchase it online on Sep 20?
post #3 of 41
Originally Posted by appletouches View Post
Since the 5S does no have a pre-order, wonder what the delivery date would be if I purchase it online on Sep 20?

 

Depends on when you purchase it that day.

Originally Posted by Marvin

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Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #4 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The iPhone 5s will also be able to change the behaviour of apps depending on the user's motion. When driving, for instance, a navigation app may be called on to provide driving directions. When the user gets out of their car and starts walking, the navigation app could switch the type of direction information appropriately...

 

This was the part where my jaw hit the floor.

post #5 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dunks View Post

This was the part where my jaw hit the floor.

It makes Apples purchase of all of those small mapping Apps make more sense. Most of this functionality will probably hit iOS 8 and be prominately featured on the iPhone 6 with backwards compatibility with the 5S
post #6 of 41
This could make those "sleep cycle alarm" apps efficient enough to not necessarily need a power connection all night long.

It could also help GPS apps (including weather alerts and geofences), making the even lower-power than Location Services already is, by waking them up to check for an updated location only if movement has been sensed. After all, you can't change coordinates without also jostling your phone.

I'm not sure what's left to put in a watch!
post #7 of 41
Funny, the financial analysts and media are criticizing Apple for "not innovating". And yet Apple seems to be adding innovations like the M7 that directly improve what we can do with an iPhone.

The only thing they'll be happy with is if Apple goes for lowest common denominator cost cutting changes. Of course if Apple does that then the resulting price war will reduce profit margins and the same financial analysts will punish Apple later on (just like the netbook market).

Best to ignore these folks.
post #8 of 41
With this technology real-time traffic data could be compiled using tens of millions of iPhones in use rather than thousands of a particular app whose drivers are providing that information.
post #9 of 41

This is one of the best technology use that Motorola and Apple have come up with.

My Moto X (Which also has separate motion sensor), detects automatic drive mode and other modes as well.

If it detects drive mode, it automatically starts music (If selected in setting) and says calling number etc.

 

Addition to that Active display shows notification on lock screen and they come up only when display is not stowed. If display is stowed(Pocket detection etc.), it turns off Active notification.

Best part is the messages,alerts,texts,voicemail,calendar etc comes on active display with off screen and you can preview by sliding up or down.

Also I read somewhere that they only turn on selected pixels to display those notifications and Time to save battery. I am getting 24 hours of battery with very heavy web usage (Wifi/LTE), very few calls and 1 hour of music, which is way batter then nexus 4.

 

I guess this will become common in next iteration among all android copy cats as well.

post #10 of 41

You will get your's some time after mine arrives! :lol:

post #11 of 41
This chip sounds like GPS apps that only use speaker could use way less battery.
post #12 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by shahhet2 View Post
 

This is one of the best technology use that Motorola and Apple have come up with.

My Moto X (Which also has separate motion sensor), detects automatic drive mode and other modes as well.

If it detects drive mode, it automatically starts music (If selected in setting) and says calling number etc.

 

Addition to that Active display shows notification on lock screen and they come up only when display is not stowed. If display is stowed(Pocket detection etc.), it turns off Active notification.

Best part is the messages,alerts,texts,voicemail,calendar etc comes on active display with off screen and you can preview by sliding up or down.

Also I read somewhere that they only turn on selected pixels to display those notifications and Time to save battery. I am getting 24 hours of battery with very heavy web usage (Wifi/LTE), very few calls and 1 hour of music, which is way batter then nexus 4.

 

I guess this will become common in next iteration among all android copy cats as well.

 

Really?  There is no mention of a motion co-processor on the Moto X web site

 

http://www.motorola.com/us/FLEXR1-1/Moto-X/FLEXR1.html

 

Perhaps you are confusing the motion co-processor with the built-in sensors that smart phones have.

post #13 of 41

Am I the only one who thought "smart watch" when Phil was talking about the use of fitness apps on the M7 chip?

post #14 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveN View Post
 

 

Really?  There is no mention of a motion co-processor on the Moto X web site

 

http://www.motorola.com/us/FLEXR1-1/Moto-X/FLEXR1.html

 

Perhaps you are confusing the motion co-processor with the built-in sensors that smart phones have.

I believe it has Atmel "Sensor Hub" MCU

You don't have to read too far but this article only from AI.

 

"The iPhone 5s follows quickly in the footsteps of another flagship device with a focus on motion sensing, the Moto X from Google-owned Motorola.

In revealing that device, however, Motorola did not stress the fitness applications of the built-in, low-power motion sensors. The company did, though, showcase such features as the phone automatically displaying information on its screen when it detects itself being removed from a pocket. Motorola's device can also automatically switch into camera mode when it detects it is being moved into a photo-taking position.

No such features were announced for the iPhone 5s, but Apple can conceivably add similar functionality via updates to iOS."

 

Regardless, I was talking about the usefulness of feature, where all these processing is not done by main cpu and that's how it saves battery life even while getting all sensor data detections realtime.
 

post #15 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by shahhet2 View Post
 

I believe it has Atmel "Sensor Hub" MCU

You don't have to read too far but this article only from AI.

 

"The iPhone 5s follows quickly in the footsteps of another flagship device with a focus on motion sensing, the Moto X from Google-owned Motorola.

In revealing that device, however, Motorola did not stress the fitness applications of the built-in, low-power motion sensors. The company did, though, showcase such features as the phone automatically displaying information on its screen when it detects itself being removed from a pocket. Motorola's device can also automatically switch into camera mode when it detects it is being moved into a photo-taking position.

No such features were announced for the iPhone 5s, but Apple can conceivably add similar functionality via updates to iOS."

 

Regardless, I was talking about the usefulness of feature, where all these processing is not done by main cpu and that's how it saves battery life even while getting all sensor data detections realtime.
 

 

Ah, my bad.  It is late here and I already forgot that part when I reached your comment.  I checked Google's Moto X page and didn't see mention of it. I guess I'd better call it a night.

post #16 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by appletouches View Post

Since the 5S does no have a pre-order, wonder what the delivery date would be if I purchase it online on Sep 20?

Also I wonder what happened to those highly intelligent people who camped outside the Apple store 4 days prior to Apple's Sept 10 event?

post #17 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveN View Post
 

 

Really?  There is no mention of a motion co-processor on the Moto X web site

 

http://www.motorola.com/us/FLEXR1-1/Moto-X/FLEXR1.html

 

Perhaps you are confusing the motion co-processor with the built-in sensors that smart phones have.

 

No, he is talking about the Motorola X8 MCS Homemade SoC that they launched in the MotoX. It is actually 2 extra processors not one. 1 L-NLP Processor that only handles Voice recognition, mic and other Audio and 1 CCP processor That handles all the censors like the M7. They both Motorola proprietary chips outside the Qualcomm MSM8960 CPU in his Moto X

 

you can read some here

 

http://www.phonearena.com/news/Motorola-X8-homemade-SoC-recap-modified-Snapdragon-forms-the-first-true-mobile-computing-system_id45632#2-

 

Nice to see Motorola back in processors after the Freescale fiasco even if just mobile computing systems.


Edited by agramonte - 9/11/13 at 9:10pm
post #18 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

This could make those "sleep cycle alarm" apps efficient enough to not necessarily need a power connection all night long.

It could also help GPS apps (including weather alerts and geofences), making the even lower-power than Location Services already is, by waking them up to check for an updated location only if movement has been sensed. After all, you can't change coordinates without also jostling your phone.

I'm not sure what's left to put in a watch!

But that's the beauty of this! The iWatch could be a much simpler device... since the phone would have most of the high-end hardware and sensors.

The downside is that it would only work with iPhones that have the M7 chip... only the iPhone 5S for now.

I'm sure we'll be seeing many smartwatches from other manufacturers who try to shove everything including the kitchen sink into the watch... making it extra big and bulky.

I can't imagine Apple doing that. If the iWatch is truly an accessory to the iPhone... it would make more sense to put most of the hardware in the phone.

Or at least that's how I see it 1smile.gif
post #19 of 41
Surely the M7 is a bigger win for AppleTV connected "Kinect style" games?
post #20 of 41
While there are many potential future benefits for the user with the new motion co-processor, the main architecture reason to adding the motion co-processor is to add battery life. The Gyro, Mag, and Accel sensor sampling, the math, such as Kalman filtering, and batching of the data can be performed on the M7 motion co-processor. The A7 need only get data on occasionally, and thus can be sleeping in a low power mode while data accumulates on the M7. It seems like this is the future direction for smartphones. I found a reference for a Sensor Fusion Co-processor on the PNI Sensor Corporation website: http://www.pnicorp.com/products/sentral It seems to be similar to what Apple has announced, and they describe needing only 1/100th the power relative to a Cortex M0 processor to do the same 'math'.
Edited by SensorExpert - 9/11/13 at 9:38pm
post #21 of 41

I agree with other comments about the possibilities of this technology.  Do we know whether there is anything NEW in the M7?  Any new capability that isn't there in the iPhone 5?

 

Sounds like only thing enhancement is increased battery life (M7 runs in the background and the A7 can go to super low power state).

post #22 of 41
Apple has always been very clever with battery-saving optimizations. (Kind of the opposite of Samsung.)

Today, out of nowhere, someone sent me a link to this article and asked me about it, probably because I used to work at a sensor company ages ago. I admit I am curious about it, too, because Apple doesn't usually go into this level of detail about how they manage their tricks. They must really think they've got something here.

Does anyone know if the technology is homegrown, or if they bought it from some company like the one mentioned above? It seems like the kind of thing that should already be ubiquitous, but I guess someone actually has to be the first to think of it ...
post #23 of 41
It's too bad that every feature Apple adds to the iPhone is seen as useless by Wall Street and the smartphone industry. Apple never seems to add the features everyone is expecting. Every iPhone for the past few years has been seen as a huge disappointment. One would think that will all of Apple's money, they'd be able to do better so that the big money would be impressed.
post #24 of 41
I am a finance guy, and I would describe the Wall Street reaction to this as comical. (Bear in mind that the stock-price drop today was mostly because of the 5c pricing, and to a much lesser extent because the 5s didn't come with a bigger screen.)

The biggest problem is not that the 5s isn't a terrific phone, it's that they no longer have Steve Jobs telling the world how insanely great every new feature is. I mean, he would have been all over this M7, and by the time he was done talking, every Android owner would be blaming all their battery problems on the lack of an M7.
post #25 of 41
It's only a failure when Apple does it.

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post #26 of 41

The M7 in the iPhone is a trial version of the iWatch, in my opinion. This because:

 

1. this processor does not contain any sensors in itself. It just gathers data from the available sensors even when the device is in sleep mode.

2. this is basically the only processor a smart watch needs, aside of the sensors itself and a small CPU/GPU to power the tiny screen.

3. the M7 begs to be used with an array of sensors, not only the gyroscope. Think: Heart rate, blood sugar, GPS data, and so on.

 

 

So, all in all, I think the M7 is the most interesting processor Apple put in the iPhone. Because it paves the way for the iWatch "sooner" rather than later. It allows, with 64bit code (if what programmers say is true) to save CPU cycles and hence operate a smart watch with little battery use, which can gather sensor information 24/7, and make the Samsung attempt pale in comparison.

 

Just my two cents.

post #27 of 41
There's one thing that struck me more than everything else. Steve Jobs was so much a product guy. Look at today's presentation. How much time did the people on stage spend with the actual product in their hands? ZERO! It was all about "product videos" accurately shot and staged. But not "hands on time". And it has been like this for a while, actually right after Jobs.


I still remember Steve Jobs sitting on a couch with the iPad in his hands. THAT IS HOW YOU PRESENT A PRODUCT. There's no point in a keynote if you show off a video, talk about features with a presentation and don't spend any amount of time with the product in your hand using it!

People want to see what is means for them as human beings, want to identify themselves. And no "corporate motivational video" will convey such a message.
Steve used to hold a product in his hand, drool (as hegeman pointed out perfectly) over the features, play with the product in his hands (remember the Air? The picture of Steve holding the computer on the palm of his hand is still the most used to talk about it), and only after all that he would show a video to "sum it up".
Now we have wonderful products, presented in an aseptic fashion, with no human bond or touch.

Take out an iPhone 5C in an color, SCRATCH IT WITH KEYS and show it to the audience! That's memorable. That makes headlines. Let the iPhone 5C fall on concrete and pick it up. THAT SHOWS it's DURABLE.

Today's Apple management is too afraid of failure and unforeseen to actually use a product. The most "hands on time" with the iPhone was done by the developers of a game who played it on stage! That's not the way to create a bond, to create a "wow" effect.

Nope. The products are amazing, but the new team of leaders is too shy to step forward and show the world how amazing apple still is. By touching the product, using it, even if it crashes and make a joke about it.

"our customers will be delighted".

I FEARED THE DAY SOMEONE WOULD SAY THAT AT APPLE. And that day has come.

Get your "act" (really, in the sense of "acting") together. RIGHT AWAY.

"OUR CUSTOMERS"? WTF!!!! What about "we design products we want to use???"

"we are delighted, we like, I was surprised, we did some amazing stuff". See? It's not that hard. Maybe Apple should hire me.... Only for the presentation part though, as I am sure I could never come up with the amazing stuff they do. But I could come up with a much better presentation.

I am mainly critizinig the words of the CEO, not the ones from the engineers. They seem to be proud of what they do and speak about it in these terms. But the CEO should convey the OVERALL VALUE. Let the geeks speak to the geeks. But then show the crossing between technology and the liberal arts. Take a phone call to show the new ringtones. TAKE A PICTURE OF THE AUDIENCE (half dark setting, perfect to show the new "luminosity" feature) AND SHOW IT TO THEM LIVE. Instead of showing an array of pictures taken by some Magnum agency member in perfect settings.
Let them WOW!!!


Ah... Tiny details that make the whole difference between a product and "something i can't live without".
post #28 of 41

I'm a hardware guy but have some questions which for want of time I should research myself. Perhaps those who actually know the answers could fill me in, thanks:

 

• Is the A7 the first 64 bit processor to go into a phone? Does every non-serial component sit on a 64 bit bus?

• Are the new imaging capabilities such as burst mode, high fidelity imaging and ultra-high speed imaging (120 fps) leveraged directly of the power of the 64 bit processor. That is, have similar features been implemented in 32 bit systems?

• Does the display parallax effect rely heavily on the animation (or other) APIs in iOS? Would it be practical to implement on a system lacking iOS' refinement in this respect?

• Does any other manufacturer employ an M7-like coprocessor? The idea of chips dedicated to managing external functionality isn't new but this implementation promises so much.

• Does the iPhone have a temperature transducer (thermistor) available to be interrogated? A barometric (pressure) transducer? (Haven't seen apps that use such.)

• Does the M7 store finely time-resolved data or only aggregates? For example, does it know the path I've taken from one location to another?

• Other obvious questions that I didn't ask. :\

 

All the best.

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post #29 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post
 

I'm a hardware guy but have some questions which for want of time I should research myself. Perhaps those who actually know the answers could fill me in, thanks:

 

1 • Is the A7 the first 64 bit processor to go into a phone? Does every non-serial component sit on a 64 bit bus?

2 • Are the new imaging capabilities such as burst mode, high fidelity imaging and ultra-high speed imaging (120 fps) leveraged directly of the power of the 64 bit processor. That is, have similar features been implemented in 32 bit systems?

3 • Does the display parallax effect rely heavily on the animation (or other) APIs in iOS? Would it be practical to implement on a system lacking iOS' refinement in this respect?

4 • Does any other manufacturer employ an M7-like coprocessor? The idea of chips dedicated to managing external functionality isn't new but this implementation promises so much.

5 • Does the iPhone have a temperature transducer (thermistor) available to be interrogated? A barometric (pressure) transducer? (Haven't seen apps that use such.)

6 • Does the M7 store finely time-resolved data or only aggregates? For example, does it know the path I've taken from one location to another?

7 • Other obvious questions that I didn't ask. :\

 

All the best.

1) There are some phones with the Intel Z2420 chip inside, which from my information is also 64 bit, so no...

2) Both S4 and HTC One have burst mode and 120fps (albeit not in 720p)

3) Andoid has featured interactive wallpapers using this parallax effect for many years. Note, this only works on the homescreen, so no "deep" OS integration

4) see above, motorola android phones have a dedicated sensor coprocessor. Qualcomm also employs a 'sensor core', do not know if it's comparable.

5,6,7) for others to answer

 

Still, I'm impressed with the progress Apple has made with its own processor. It will certainly start rumors again of an ARM OSX version and Apple dropping Intel for it's MacBook Air range...

 

It will also be interesting to see what Intel can do with its new Bay Trail chips, which are significantly faster than any ARM offering, and seem to have solved the power usage problem. The giant may be awaken ;)

post #30 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

This could make those "sleep cycle alarm" apps efficient enough to not necessarily need a power connection all night long.

It could also help GPS apps (including weather alerts and geofences), making the even lower-power than Location Services already is, by waking them up to check for an updated location only if movement has been sensed. After all, you can't change coordinates without also jostling your phone.

I'm not sure what's left to put in a watch!

How about putting the M7 in the iWatch so it communicates with the iPhone 5c (since it doesn't have a M7) thus making the 5c the mate to the iWatch...not the 5s... Wouldn't that turn the whole idea of the 5c being the cheap phone on its head?!!

If you paid attention to what was said when introducing the successor to the iPhone 5, you will see they didn't make any claim of the 5c being a "lower cost" device. Here's the transcript:

"In the past, when we introduced a new iPhone, we lowered the price of the old iphone."
"This year, we're not going to do that."
"This year, we're going to replace the iPhone 5."
"With not one, but two new designs."

BOTH iPhones replace the iPhone 5...!!!
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post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by abazigal View Post
 

Am I the only one who thought "smart watch" when Phil was talking about the use of fitness apps on the M7 chip?

 

No you're not. The M7 along with Touch ID tome were the things that stood out the most, hardware wise.

This, despite the numerous Internet warriors , claiming that Apple does not innovate any longer.

post #32 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinolo View Post
 

So, all in all, I think the M7 is the most interesting processor Apple put in the iPhone. Because it paves the way for the iWatch "sooner" rather than later. It allows, with 64bit code (if what programmers say is true) to save CPU cycles and hence operate a smart watch with little battery use, which can gather sensor information 24/7, and make the Samsung attempt pale in comparison.

 

Just my two cents.

 

Finally, someone who gets it. That's more than I can say about Samsung, who spent years trying to convince us that bigger is better, with their ridiculously sized phablets, to only now shrink, the Note III's screen down to 2" on their Gear.

 

Just your 2 cents? I disagree. Two cents, is what Samsung's idea of a smart watch, is worth. I bet that your idea and definitely Jony Ive's, are worth far more than that.

post #33 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

I'm not sure what's left to put in a watch!
A display and a battery. And maybe the smallest, weakest, power efficient processor needed to just simply display information. The fact that the phone is now bearing the weight of all the lifting is incredible if apple wanted to release a watch. The gyroscope, accelerometer, processor, etc are inside all the current watches like pebble- obviously draining battery life. The batter on an iWatch would last forever and not being thick in the slightest.

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post #34 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

But that's the beauty of this! The iWatch could be a much simpler device... since the phone would have most of the high-end hardware and sensors.

The downside is that it would only work with iPhones that have the M7 chip... only the iPhone 5S for now.

I'm sure we'll be seeing many smartwatches from other manufacturers who try to shove everything including the kitchen sink into the watch... making it extra big and bulky.

I can't imagine Apple doing that. If the iWatch is truly an accessory to the iPhone... it would make more sense to put most of the hardware in the phone.

Or at least that's how I see it 1smile.gif

That makes a lot of sense. However, If they make it dependent on a 5S and beyond they would piss off a lot of users though. Perhaps certain features would be but not all. Good way of selling iPhone users up too I guess. Having said that I can't see the iWatch just being aimed at joggers. I suspect there has to be a plethora of things it will do that will appeal to a far greater, and maybe currently non watch wearing folks.

Of course Wall Street will hate Apple's iWatch unless it can teleport the wearer across a Continent. Even then they would moan if it were limited to a single land mass at a time. That said, if it could teleport trans-globally they'd bitch it wasn't interstellar.
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post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDBA View Post

Finally, someone who gets it. That's more than I can say about Samsung, who spent years trying to convince us that bigger is better, with their ridiculously sized phablets, to only now shrink, the Note III's screen down to 2" on their Gear.

Just your 2 cents? I disagree. Two cents, is what Samsung's idea of a smart watch, is worth. I bet that your idea and definitely Jony Ive's, are worth far more than that.

... I got my wife's two year old color iPod nano with its wrist band out of a draw this morning for the first time in months ... you know, it sure seems a hell of lot like the new Scamsung Smart Watch!
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post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post
 

I'm a hardware guy but have some questions which for want of time I should research myself. Perhaps those who actually know the answers could fill me in, thanks:

 

• Is the A7 the first 64 bit processor to go into a phone? Does every non-serial component sit on a 64 bit bus?

• Are the new imaging capabilities such as burst mode, high fidelity imaging and ultra-high speed imaging (120 fps) leveraged directly of the power of the 64 bit processor. That is, have similar features been implemented in 32 bit systems?

• Does the display parallax effect rely heavily on the animation (or other) APIs in iOS? Would it be practical to implement on a system lacking iOS' refinement in this respect?

• Does any other manufacturer employ an M7-like coprocessor? The idea of chips dedicated to managing external functionality isn't new but this implementation promises so much.

• Does the iPhone have a temperature transducer (thermistor) available to be interrogated? A barometric (pressure) transducer? (Haven't seen apps that use such.)

• Does the M7 store finely time-resolved data or only aggregates? For example, does it know the path I've taken from one location to another?

• Other obvious questions that I didn't ask. :\

 

All the best.

 

You ask some interesting questions. Seems like you might be a designer. As far as your question on other M7-like co-processors on the market, in addition to the Qualcomm and Motorola suggestions, you should check out the 'SENtral' Sensor Fusion co-processor I found at PNI Sensor Corporation. They claim SENtral requires only 1/100th of the power of a Cortex M0, so the M7 could be a compelling benifit for battery life, possibly enabling future applications that previously were not possible.

post #37 of 41
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Originally Posted by SensorExpert View Post
 

 

You ask some interesting questions. Seems like you might be a designer. As far as your question on other M7-like co-processors on the market, in addition to the Qualcomm and Motorola suggestions, you should check out the 'SENtral' Sensor Fusion co-processor I found at PNI Sensor Corporation. They claim SENtral requires only 1/100th of the power of a Cortex M0, so the M7 could be a compelling benifit for battery life, possibly enabling future applications that previously were not possible.

 

Thank you for your kind thoughts and the information you passed along. You might recall from many years ago, the advent of supervisory chips that were designed to perform basic housekeeping functions at very low power. The M7 is a modern and vastly expanded implementation and perhaps, all that the iWatch will require (perhaps in concert with an iPhone). Did you know too that MEMs devices such as accelerometers and (later), gyroscopes, have been around for about 15 years? Apple implements functionality so elegantly not necessarily by employing bleeding edge technology but by the pursuit of excellence, although the fingerprint sensor in this case is probably an example of both.

 

All the best.

Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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post #38 of 41
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Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

That makes a lot of sense. However, If they make it dependent on a 5S and beyond they would piss off a lot of users though. Perhaps certain features would be but not all. Good way of selling iPhone users up too I guess. Having said that I can't see the iWatch just being aimed at joggers. I suspect there has to be a plethora of things it will do that will appeal to a far greater, and maybe currently non watch wearing folks.

Of course Wall Street will hate Apple's iWatch unless it can teleport the wearer across a Continent. Even then they would moan if it were limited to a single land mass at a time. That said, if it could teleport trans-globally they'd bitch it wasn't interstellar.

I've heard some speculation that the purported "iWatch" would be something like an amped up Nike FuelBand with a small display for phone notifications. Think Nike FuelBand + Pebble watch

This would be in stark contrast to Samsung shoving the entire guts of a powerful smartphone into a watch... resulting in one-day battery life 1oyvey.gif

There's definitely a couple of ways Apple could go with this. I'm genuinely curious to see what they come up with 1smile.gif
post #39 of 41
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Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


That makes a lot of sense. However, If they make it dependent on a 5S and beyond they would piss off a lot of users though...

 

With the release of the 5C and the young demographic to whom it would be attractive, tying any future biometric device or service only to the 5S would be out of the question, surely.

Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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post #40 of 41

To clarify a little, the A7 chip is the first 64 bit ARM (to my knowledge). 

 

Other motion coprocessor (I think the only other one)...It is used in most other devices.

 

Atmel

maXFusion™ technology, integrated into our mXF1664S and mXF1188S devices, combines data from multiple sensors—accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer—to deliver accurate, real-time, motion-related information. This technology works with Windows 8- and Android-based mobile products, providing sophisticated motion detection capabilities that complement the advanced touch functions enabled by our controllers.

 

Nevertheless, there is not enough information yet to compare differences or similarities between the two. I can only say that in this realm there have been advances previously. 

 

For the last questions, we don't know yet about whether or not it includes them yet. 

 

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