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Apple hiring 'genre experts' to fine tune iTunes Radio programming

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
In the run-up to the launch of iTunes Radio, Apple is hiring on a number of genre experts in order to give its music streaming service a human touch that competitors might not easily be able to match.



Apple is looking for radio music programmers with deep knowledge of genres such as Latin, metal, and alternative, according to CNET. Those genre experts would be charged with selecting and promoting songs out of the thousands that the major and indie labels release each month.

Apple's postings seeking these genre experts call for "tastemakers" who are "passionate about discovering exciting new music and artists." Candidates are expected to have a strong understanding and background in how the music business operates, with five years experience and knowledge in retail, radio, A&R, editorial, record labels, and any other music related fields.

The genre experts would be responsible for programming featured stations within iTunes Radio. This element in particular could help distinguish Apple's streaming music service from its competition. Pandora uses algorithms and user feedback to figure out which song to play next. Apple, by contrast, will be relying at least in part on human tastemakers.

Apple has also been working with major music labels to determine which acts they believe are "heat seekers," or groups that are on the verge of making it big according to label data, but have not yet made the leap. Reportedly, some within the major labels are excited at the possibility of Apple remaking the radio landscape. Pandora has famously struggled with the labels over licensing fees, and Spotify is little different.

"We're hoping Apple shakes up the entire radio market," one aunnamed music executive said.

Apple, though, has been aggressively looking to monetize its streaming offer, courting advertisers in order to make good on the licensing deals it struck with the major labels ahead of revealing iTunes Radio.
post #2 of 17
That would be well appreciated, I've already had a few artists I couldn't build a radio station from.
Just say no to MacMall.  They don't honor their promotions and won't respond to customer inquiries.  There are better retailers out there.
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Just say no to MacMall.  They don't honor their promotions and won't respond to customer inquiries.  There are better retailers out there.
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post #3 of 17
Apple, I volunteer for fusion jazz! :-)
post #4 of 17
"Pandora uses algorithms and user feedback to figure out which song to play next. Apple, by contrast, will be relying at least in part on human tastemakers. "

Erm, those algorithms that Pandora uses are driven from data prepared by their "human tastemakers": see http://www.pandora.com/about/mgp

What you say is misleading, even though Apple's approach is slightly different in that it is less algorithmic and more heavily curated, Pandora is also "relying at least in part on human tastemakers".
post #5 of 17
Can someone tell me why my itune radio had disappeared😡 it was there a few days ago I'm on GM GOLD MASTER.
post #6 of 17

I'm not quite sure how iTunes Radio works, or I don't want to believe that it works the way it does. It appears more purely station driven, rather than artist, track, and album driven. I was hoping for something more along  the lines of Spotify, where I can search the catalogue and play only the specific artist, track, or album I was looking for.

 

With stations, I might discover new stuff, however, there are certain artists that I am specifically in interested in and certain albums from artists I already have in my collection that I'd like to hear and maybe purchase. The 90 second samples in iTunes is not quite enough. 

For your sake, I hope you're right.
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For your sake, I hope you're right.
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post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carthusia View Post
 

I'm not quite sure how iTunes Radio works, or I don't want to believe that it works the way it does. It appears more purely station driven, rather than artist, track, and album driven. 

 

I'm confused what you're trying to say. It works exactly the way Pandora does, minus the thumbs.

post #8 of 17

I don't really listen to the radio at all, but since I already have iTunes match and I'll be getting the ads free version of this for free, I guess that I will at least check it out. I'm happy with iTunes match now, by the way. I had a few complaints a while back, but those have been taken care of now.

post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by zexpe View Post

Erm, those algorithms that Pandora uses are driven from data prepared by their "human tastemakers": see http://www.pandora.com/about/mgp
 

 

Hopefully, Apple's "human tastemakers" will do a better job than Pandora's algorithms (or whatever the hell they use). I stopped listening to Pandora specifically because their "music genome project" insisted, for example, that some band from the 60's went perfectly well with a band from the 80's because they both had keyboard driven melodies or some such thing.

post #10 of 17

Hire Chris Douridas for Underground/Alternative/New music, hire Henry Rollins for Punk music, hire Tom Schnabel for Latin music expertise (all DJs).

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #11 of 17
As long as Jethro Tull doesn't end up in the Metal genre.
post #12 of 17

Man, what a cool job to have.  I wish you didn't have to relocate to California to take it.  Seems like the sort of thing that would work from anywhere.

post #13 of 17
I would love to be able to spend my spare time at home doing this type of job. It's better than watching TV at night.
post #14 of 17
I am frustrated that their is no dubstep station.
post #15 of 17
Originally Posted by rossistboss View Post
I am frustrated that their is no dubstep station.

 

Just listen to one of them on loop; problem solved.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSteelers View Post

As long as Jethro Tull doesn't end up in the Metal genre.

Ha ha! Grammy voters need not apply.
post #17 of 17

On my phone the iTunes "Genius" was a complete moron. I've tried Pandora and Spotify and they have both done a terrible job of predicting what music I would like. In addition, Spotify plays the same 30-40 songs over and over, will occasionally add a new one, and plays songs that I have already tagged with a "thumbs down". Oh, and they compress the hell out of their commercial spots so that they are much louder than the music your are listening to, I guess in an attempt to damage everyone's ear drums. But, I digress.


Bottom line is that whether it's human "genre experts", "tastemakers" or algorithms, they will never get it right, not even close, at least not in my case. Here's why: Many artists have songs I love and also songs I can't stand. I listen to a wide range of music genres, but within some of those genres there is a very narrow window of what I like. Alogoriths and human "genre experts" apply objective rules (if A, then B) to something that is highly subjective. In my experience predictive software that attempts to wrangle something as subjective as musical taste has performed less like a perceptive genius and more like a bad fortune teller, occasionally getting it right, but more often than not only providing disappointment and frustration.

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