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Bug in iOS 7 allows calls to be placed from locked iPhone - Page 3

post #81 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by iRon man View Post

I'd be willing to bet that if pretty much any software ever released would show up with plenty of unexpected glitches if it were subject to this much popularity, and this much recognition for finding obscure bugs...

As plenty of MS software was and is. The point I was making is that good testers try and break stuff - even if it annoys engineers. Sometimes you can ignore these kind of bugs as "user abuse" but not in security locked screens. I was just making the point that unless testers get to stray from scripts they won't find this.

There is a general issue here too - from a engineering point of view it looks like when an app is launched from the control centre when locked its not really in any kind of secure sandboxed state. It is launched by the control centre and "knows" per app to quit back to the control centre when closed. It signals the control centre to relaunch. However that doesn't seem to work on a crash. The app just crashes and the springboard is relaunched
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post #82 of 114

Actually there’s an easier way to make a call when an iPhone is locked – simply use Siri and it works perfectly unless it was specifically explicitly disabled in the passcode lock setup. That’s a feature by the way not a bug.

 

At any rate, this type of lock bypass bug routinely pops up on Android devices (e.g. google ‘another lockscreen security bug found in Samsung Android phones’) but I don’t see the same level of hyperbolic headline pundit coverage.

post #83 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


Nonsense. Some one did it. After two days.

EDIT: and if you going to come back with - one person out of millions - the kind of guys who try this are a tiny fraction of total users. So a tester in apple could have found it were he allowed to.

 

Yes, it is important.

 

I think the real point here is that this is vulnerable to a *deliberate* attack: someone trying to break into your (stolen and potentially containing sensitive information) phone could exploit it. Hence, someone intending to steal phones might very well look for this kind of vulnerability. Hence security specialists (white hats) look for this kind of stuff, amongst others.

 
I see all these vulnerabilities when not "logged-in" as quite disappointing. One of the iPhone's real strengths is its security architecture (it is regarded as pretty good by those that understand these things, unlike certain other systems [eg here]) and it didn't happen by accident. So I'd expect the smart guys at Apple that designed it to understand that anything that makes exceptions to the security model - like apps running whilst not logged-in - is a real danger so needs to be tested to exhaustion. One of the things you'd look at is all the routes 'out' of the app (eg home button, multi-tasking switching, race hazards with these) because they need to perform differently in this special logged-out state; that should be obvious.
 
The fact that they didn't catch these indicates inadequate testing. That's always the case with undetected bugs, the interesting point is why? The reason could be premature release of the software (not yet finished testing, as others have suggested), cost, lack of understanding, not caring or something else. Since this is Apple, I'd rule out all but a need to release too early (so it'll be fixed soon, along with other issues that no-one outside found). But it's a shame it happened.
 
On the subject of testing, the best approach in my (professional) experience is a *mixture* of scripted testing and 'free-play' (where the testers try their hardest to break something by obscure means). I've seen software design and test teams locked in a very productive competition over how many faults the test team can find. It might have been Douglas Adams that said "when trying to design something completely foolproof [never] underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools", the same goes for hackers.

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post #84 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


There is a general issue here too - from a engineering point of view it looks like when an app is launched from the control centre when locked its not really in any kind of secure sandboxed state. It is launched by the control centre and "knows" per app to quit back to the control centre when closed. It signals the control centre to relaunch. However that doesn't seem to work on a crash. The app just crashes and the springboard is relaunched

 

Yes, I agree that there may be an architectural issue here as well as a testing one. Anything done per-app is suspect, it's vulnerable to flaws and takes more effort to test.

 

As a user, I love being able to use camera and calculator (etc) without "logging-in"; as a designer, I find it a little scary. This is one reason why the 5S's fingerprint sensor is so important: assuming it works reliably, it makes authentication quick and painless so there's no longer a need for apps to run outside the secured log-in state. That way, the problem gets designed out (the whole class of potential problems goes away).

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post #85 of 114
Originally Posted by Durandal1707 View Post
Everyone knows what the point of your original post was — that this is all a feature, Apple's engineers deliberately went out of their way to make it possible to bypass the security, but only if you mashed the call button like you were playing an 80s video game.

 

Please try again when you’re able to read.

 

Originally Posted by iRon man View Post
Has this not been answered for you?

 

Yes, and thank you. But why it’s still a dial in and not single button access is baffling.

“The only thing more insecure than Android is its userbase.” – Can’t Remember

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post #86 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 But why it’s still a dial in and not single button access is baffling.

Perhaps it's to prevent accidental calls... or prevent intentional calls that are claimed to be accidental. Perhaps it's the law or regulation, in some or all countries. Perhaps it's because the emergency number varies between countries; and even if Apple could develop a system that changed the number dialed accordingly, perhaps Apple wouldn't want to shoulder the liability of maintaining that system at 100% up-time and accuracy.

post #87 of 114

I did this on a friend's iPhone at a party last night.  It was a neat party trick.

post #88 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

Yes, and thank you. But why it’s still a dial in and not single button access is baffling.

 

Because the world is more complex than the damn US, and even in the US, not everything warrants calling 911. Why do Americans always think the entire world ticks by their clocks?

In Europe there are separate emergency numbers for Police, Ambulance, Road Side Assistance and Fire (which means FASTER service)

Because there are sometimes highway emergency numbers.

Because how would you know what number to dial, and this question isn't asked for no reason, Apple gets this already wrong with other things: based on your region settings? Based on the SIM card? Based on location services?

 

Region settings won't work, because people like to retain their preferred date and language settings no matter where they are.

SIM card won't work, because people roam, even internationally.

Location services won't work, because there are situations where you may have to call non-local emergency services and location services may be turned off to save power and aren't always reliable. Further e.g. in Europe you spend a lot of time near national borders. You may be in the German mobile network, while being on Austrian ground. What's the German police going to do with an emergency call originating from Austria?

 

Side note about how Apple gets region settings on iOS wrong:

There's no way to specify date and phone number formatting, except by fishing for a region that has the formatting you like, in my case English-language Maltese settings. I'm not in Malta, I'm in the US, and sometimes in other parts of Europe.

But what does Apple do? Default to Google Malta in searches (google.com.mt instead of google.com), places me randomly to Malta in various apps, etc.

Apple's overzealous drive at simplification which already screwed up AppleIDs royally (people ARE not an e-mail address, people HAVE an e-mail address, i.e. mixing up HAS-A and IS-A relationships) strikes again: region settings for formatting dates and times have nothing to do with where I am, or if these are default location settings, then my default location has nothing to do with how I want things formatted on screen. But Apple, trying to simplify is more and more falling into the trap of oversimplification which then creates trouble.

 

I'm glad they haven't yet fallen into that trap with emergency dialing, but if you give them some time, they will eventually implement emergency dialing just like you propose with a single button, and eventually people will die, because that won't cover the complex situations life throws at us in reality.

post #89 of 114
Originally Posted by rcfa View Post

Because the world is more complex than the damn US, and even in the US, not everything warrants calling 911. Why do Americans always think the entire world ticks by their clocks?

In Europe there are separate emergency numbers for Police, Ambulance, Road Side Assistance and Fire (which means FASTER service)

 

Magical. It would obviously violate the laws of physics to have the OS show separate buttons for said separate services, so let’s keep the keypad around, I guess. And since to make the device know where it is and offer local emergency services as required would necessitate putting all children on Earth into slavery, I guess Apple will just have to hold off on offering an intelligent solution, huh.

 

Come off it.

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post #90 of 114

Looks like the Touch ID has already been hacked. I wonder if it can be fixed in an update.

 

http://mashable.com/2013/09/22/touch-id-hacker/

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post #91 of 114

If you carefully watch the youtube video, it is full of glaring inconsistencies.  First off, why are the guys hands trembling so?  Second why is someone else actually holding the sides of the iPhone?  Why don't they clearly show us his fingers during the so called initial training session?  Why don't they show that the iphone 5s had ZERO fingerprints already trained?  Why the obvious gaps in the video chronology?  

 

They are claiming that the Authentec/Apple fingerprint technology does NOT read the subepidermis layer but rather just a very high resolution 2D surface print reader (ie just a very good version of previously demonstrated fingerprint reading technology).   That flies completely in the face of everything that Authentec announced before Apple's acquisition of the company and what has been published since.  Either Apple has been caught in a bold face lie about the technology (ie that it reads the sub epidermis layer of LIVE skin cells in 3D NOT the 2D dead skin surface layer, or the so called hackers are trying to pull a fast one.   I for one would put money on Apple being the one telling the truth as they have a LOT riding on this technology.  It simply does NOT seem reasonable to believe that the purported hack would NOT have been tried within the Apple R&D labs, not to mention during the technical due diligence performed prior to buying Authentec. 

 

I am not saying that Apple's fingerprint technology is NOT going to be hacked at some point, but this hack, even with its less than straightforward process is still way too obvious to be the legit.  I think that all this reported hack proves is that people are going to believe whatever they are predisposed to believe.

 

Either the hackers are going to have to put up the required video detailing ALL the steps with intact chronology and no room for slight of hand tricks or they are going to be totally discredited. 

 

David 

post #92 of 114
Wanna see a fun iOS 7 bug....put Voice Memos in a folder and watch the icon as you zoom in and out of the folder. Tell me if you see it.
post #93 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Looks like the Touch ID has already been hacked. I wonder if it can be fixed in an update.

http://mashable.com/2013/09/22/touch-id-hacker/
Actually what it looks like is people will believe absolutely anything.
post #94 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

Wanna see a fun iOS 7 bug....put Voice Memos in a folder and watch the icon as you zoom in and out of the folder. Tell me if you see it.

 

on my 5s I don't see any anomaly with the voice memos icon as the folder containing it is open/closed.  What did you you see?  

post #95 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtidmore View Post

If you carefully watch the youtube video, it is full of glaring inconsistencies.  First off, why are the guys hands trembling so?  Second why is someone else actually holding the sides of the iPhone?  Why don't they clearly show us his fingers during the so called initial training session?  Why don't they show that the iphone 5s had ZERO fingerprints already trained?  Why the obvious gaps in the video chronology?  

They are claiming that the Authentec/Apple fingerprint technology does NOT read the subepidermis layer but rather just a very high resolution 2D surface print reader (ie just a very good version of previously demonstrated fingerprint reading technology).   That flies completely in the face of everything that Authentec announced before Apple's acquisition of the company and what has been published since.  Either Apple has been caught in a bold face lie about the technology (ie that it reads the sub epidermis layer of LIVE skin cells in 3D NOT the 2D dead skin surface layer, or the so called hackers are trying to pull a fast one.   I for one would put money on Apple being the one telling the truth as they have a LOT riding on this technology.  It simply does NOT seem reasonable to believe that the purported hack would NOT have been tried within the Apple R&D labs, not to mention during the technical due diligence performed prior to buying Authentec. 

I am not saying that Apple's fingerprint technology is NOT going to be hacked at some point, but this hack, even with its less than straightforward process is still way too obvious to be the legit.  I think that all this reported hack proves is that people are going to believe whatever they are predisposed to believe.

Either the hackers are going to have to put up the required video detailing ALL the steps with intact chronology and no room for slight of hand tricks or they are going to be totally discredited. 

David 

Nothing the CCC guys claim is at odds with Apple statements so there's nothing Apple would be lying about.. The heavy-inked laser print CCC created delivers what's effectively a 3D print. "Scanning sub-dermal " skin layers refers to verifying electrical activity expected in live tissue which is the method Authentec used.. It's not magic.
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post #96 of 114

This is soooo funny!  If someone can get a high rez scan of MY prints, then "easily" reproduce them to a transparency, then cast a latex mold of them, wet them, then apply them to MY phone....  they can have my data.   Easy peasy.

 

That's right up there in the headlines with "Your breakfast cereal will kill you!, news at 11..."

post #97 of 114
Yo, Appleinsider, how is this a bug? the emergency call feature works the same way in iOS 6, you do not need to unlock the phone to make a phone call....
post #98 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Apparently you’re illiterate or just unwilling to read my posts in the first place yet then believe you have any right to reply to them. I’ll say it again: My statement blatantly implies that the button would be either general use or change depending on the area in which you live, but no, let’s go completely ignore the point and focus on that part of it.

 

And no, I don’t live in Cuba.

 

Sorry, but there are many countries where several emergency numbers exist, like in Europe where you have several numbers for firefighters, ambulance, police, and European emergency number 112.

post #99 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


Nothing the CCC guys claim is at odds with Apple statements so there's nothing Apple would be lying about.. The heavy-inked laser print CCC created delivers what's effectively a 3D print. "Scanning sub-dermal " skin layers refers to verifying electrical activity expected in live tissue which is the method Authentec used.. It's not magic.

 

That is not what Authentec/Apple claimed at all!  They stated and showed that they were make a capacitive topology map of the sub epidermal layers of live skin cells at a resolution of 500ppi, NOT just looking for electrical activity.  Simply looking for "something" at the sub epidermal layer would NOT offer ANY added security.  Might as well just measure for skin temperature as that would be just as secure.

 
david

Edited by dtidmore - 9/23/13 at 8:33am
post #100 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 
Originally Posted by rcfa View Post

Because the world is more complex than the damn US, and even in the US, not everything warrants calling 911. Why do Americans always think the entire world ticks by their clocks?

In Europe there are separate emergency numbers for Police, Ambulance, Road Side Assistance and Fire (which means FASTER service)

 

Magical. It would obviously violate the laws of physics to have the OS show separate buttons for said separate services, so let’s keep the keypad around, I guess. And since to make the device know where it is and offer local emergency services as required would necessitate putting all children on Earth into slavery, I guess Apple will just have to hold off on offering an intelligent solution, huh.

 

Come off it.

 

You come off it. You seem to display a psychological defect in that you are unable to admit that you were wrong. Strategically cutting out the remainder of the reasons why a single (or for that matter multiple) special purpose button(s) won't work is not honest reasoning. Trying to make absurd statements like the one about putting all children into slavery doesn't help your case, either, nor does it paint a positive picture of your psychological state of mind.

 

First you were complaining that Apple doesn't have a single button, now you morph your argument to complain that it's not multiple buttons (probably with some sort of culture invariant icon to symbolize police, medical, etc. emergencies, which would already fail, because different cultures have different expectations, and people travel, so someone who associates the Red Cresent with medical may well be in Switzerland where it's the Red Cross, etc.) How pitifully stuff like this fails is when US companies use Interstate highway number sign outlines to symbolize a highway, and about 80% of the world's population scratches their head as to what that ridiculous symbol is supposed to mean. And that's just the tip of the iceberg. 

 

Fact is: having a number key pad is what people expect from a phone, it doesn't require any further explanation, and it works in all sorts of boundary cases (literally!) like when traveling near international borders when you may fade in and out of cross-border cellular service.

post #101 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtidmore View Post
 

 

on my 5s I don't see any anomaly with the voice memos icon as the folder containing it is open/closed.  What did you you see?  

 

Oh well, to me I see the lines of the wav form on the icon shimmer a bit. Just looks like weak scaling.

post #102 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Please try again when you’re able to read.
Uh huh:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by scotty321 View Post

This has always been in all versions of iOS... the ability to make an emergency call without typing in the passcode. This is a feature, not a bug.
Weird that you’re the first to notice this. Weird that the article was written at all.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Nope. Haven’t you always been able to make any call from there? Were it just a line into 911, there would only be one button there: “911”. 

Your posts are easy enough to read, if facepalm-inducing. It's pretty obvious that, before you started back-pedaling at least, you were going on your usual "It's not a flaw, Apple is perfect, how dare anyone even have written an article about this" angle. Thanks for the personal insult, though.
Quote:
Yes, and thank you. But why it’s still a dial in and not single button access is baffling.
In addition to the myriad reasons people have already given you, perhaps 911 doesn't appreciate being pocket dialed?
post #103 of 114
Originally Posted by Overlord View Post

Sorry, but there are many countries

 

Sorry; that part was a joke.

 

Originally Posted by rcfa View Post

First you were complaining that Apple doesn’t have a single button

 

Yep.

 
…now you morph your argument to complain that its not multiple buttons…

 

Yep, because once informed that separate top-level services are the norm elsewhere, it only makes sense to modify one’s personal wish to fit that bill.

 
(probably with some sort of culture invariant icon to symbolize police, medical, etc. emergencies, which would already fail, because different cultures have different expectations, and people travel, so someone who associates the Red Cresent with medical may well be in Switzerland where it’s the Red Cross, etc.) 

 

Because that’s the only possible design one could come up with, of course.

 

What is WRONG with you people? I cannot possibly be the only human being in this THREAD, much less overall, who can actually come up with intelligent answers to this problem. You Cubans (once again, referring to that joke) have one thought, immediately, with no actual research done to it, and instantaneously dismiss it as bad. No wonder everything you think is wrong!

 

People with smartphones tend to be literate. The buttons would have words on them. It’s literally this simple to comprehend.

 

it works in all sorts of boundary cases (literally!) like when traveling near international borders when you may fade in and out of cross-border cellular service.

 

And it’s even more astonishing that you can parse situations like this without also thinking of the ludicrously obvious solution to this problem: EVERY IPHONE HAS GPS IN IT, WHICH TRIANGULATES TO WITHIN A FEW METERS. So even if you’re a refugee literally in the process of hopping over the Iron Curtain* and you’ve tripped and broken your ankle, the smartphone you’ve been sent back in time with will know where you are and just FIND the nearest service to call.

 

*Don’t you dare claim that I think the Iron Curtain was an actual wall. :lol:

 

Originally Posted by Durandal1707 View Post
perhaps 911 doesnt appreciate being pocket dialed?

 

And this happens when? If it’s possible with my solution, it’s possible with yours.

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post #104 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

What is WRONG with you people? I cannot possibly be the only human being in this THREAD, much less overall, who can actually come up with intelligent answers to this problem.
Oh, the irony.
Quote:
And this happens when? If it’s possible with my solution, it’s possible with yours.
It doesn't, because 911 isn't a one-touch operation. The odds that you will accidentally press the 9, 1, 1, keys and then the dial button in that succession by accident in your pocket are much lower than the odds that you'll accidentally hit a single button. If it were one-touch, it would happen all the friggin' time. If you haven't ever had the "emergency dial" button get pressed while in your pocket, so that when you pull your phone out it's at the emergency dialpad, my only guess is that you must not use the lock screen.

Meanwhile, the need to dial "911" is not a "problem" at all, since these numbers are *designed* to be easily memorable. The only "problem" here is your need to clear egg off your face, having embarrassed yourself earlier in the thread. OTOH, not being able to dial an emergency number, because the phone wasn't getting a good GPS signal, data connection, or whatnot, a server was down, Apple didn't bother to include support for Lithuania, or there was a latency issue that caused the list to take *just* long enough to update to make you miss your split-second window for survival... well, that actually is a problem. Emergency dialing is definitely one of the areas where you want to KISS.
Edited by Durandal1707 - 9/23/13 at 10:07am
post #105 of 114
Originally Posted by Durandal1707 View Post
It doesn't, because 911 isn't a one-touch operation. The odds that you will accidentally press the 9, 1, 1, keys and then the dial button in that succession by accident in your pocket are much lower than the odds that you'll accidentally hit a single button. If it were one-touch, it would happen all the friggin' time. If you haven't ever had the "emergency dial" button get pressed while in your pocket, so that when you pull your phone out it's at the emergency dialpad, my only guess is that you must not use the lock screen.

 

That explains, of course, why pocket dialing happens “all the friggin’ time” with all other numbers on your iPhone, I guess.

 

It’s Apple’s biggest bug, in fact, since it’s so endemic.

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post #106 of 114
I don't know about you. Accidentally pocket-dialing people in my contact list was the main reason I turned on the lock screen on my phone.

It's not a bug, either. It's just a consequence of having a touch-screen on the outside of the phone, rather than hidden inside something like the keypad used to be with the flip/slider phones.

edit: Oh look, emergency services are even mentioned on the Wikipedia page for pocket dialing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pocket_dialing#Accidental_calling_of_emergency_services
Edited by Durandal1707 - 9/23/13 at 10:26am
post #107 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 
Originally Posted by rcfa View Post

First you were complaining that Apple doesn’t have a single button

 

Yep.

 

Which would be nice and simple, if it were practical.

Quote:
…now you morph your argument to complain that it’s not multiple buttons…

 

Yep, because once informed that separate top-level services are the norm elsewhere, it only makes sense to modify one’s personal wish to fit that bill.

 

 

Which loses the whole point of simplicity, which defeats the point of not having the keypad, and which doesn't work for a variety of reasons mentioned elsewhere and below.

Quote:
(probably with some sort of culture invariant icon to symbolize police, medical, etc. emergencies, which would already fail, because different cultures have different expectations, and people travel, so someone who associates the Red Cresent with medical may well be in Switzerland where it’s the Red Cross, etc.) 

 

Because that’s the only possible design one could come up with, of course.

 

No, one could also use text, which won't work, either, see below...

Quote:

What is WRONG with you people? I cannot possibly be the only human being in this THREAD, much less overall, who can actually come up with intelligent answers to this problem. You Cubans (once again, referring to that joke) have one thought, immediately, with no actual research done to it, and instantaneously dismiss it as bad. No wonder everything you think is wrong!

What's "wrong" with people is simple: they notice how you shoot down everyone with a vengeance who doesn't agree in all minor points with your self-proclaimed Apple Fandom Spokesperson mentality, but then you expect to be treated with velvet gloves when you produce a major brain fart. Thanks to your general behavior here, people enjoy the field day and jump on you for a change. 
 
Quote:
People with smartphones tend to be literate. The buttons would have words on them. It’s literally this simple to comprehend.
 
Yes. But owners of a device don't need the emergency calling screen, they just unlock the phone and dial like usual.
The point of that screen is that ANYONE, even if otherwise unauthorized to use the phone, can place an emergency call.
So now you find that diabetic Chinese tourist collapsed on the street, pull out his phone, because yours isn't on you, or is out of battery, or crashed because you unsuccessfully tried to jail-break it, go to the emergency calling screen, and all you see is a bunch of Han Glyphs. Now try to make the proper call.
On the other hand, I don't think you're going to have an issue recognizing a regular phone dial pad.
 
Quote:

…it works in all sorts of boundary cases (literally!) like when traveling near international borders when you may fade in and out of cross-border cellular service.

 

And it’s even more astonishing that you can parse situations like this without also thinking of the ludicrously obvious solution to this problem: EVERY IPHONE HAS GPS IN IT, WHICH TRIANGULATES TO WITHIN A FEW METERS. So even if you’re a refugee literally in the process of hopping over the Iron Curtain* and you’ve tripped and broken your ankle, the smartphone you’ve been sent back in time with will know where you are and just FIND the nearest service to call.

 

*Don’t you dare claim that I think the Iron Curtain was an actual wall. :lol:

 

No it doesn't because many people for good reason have Location Services TURNED OFF, but that doesn't mean emergencies don't happen in that case.

 

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Durandal1707 View Post
…perhaps 911 doesn’t appreciate being pocket dialed?

 

And this happens when? If it’s possible with my solution, it’s possible with yours.

 

But the probability is much, much lower, which means the rate of incidents are many, many fewer.

 

 

 

 

post #108 of 114
lets not forget you could always make a phone call by saying a number to Siri...bypassing the passcode lock...

***edit, already stated earlier....helps to refresh a post before commenting..***
post #109 of 114
Sorry if this has been dealt with already - been busy since starting this reply, and then had to watch our team get beaten again in the Americas cup....
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


Yep, because once informed that separate top-level services are the norm elsewhere, it only makes sense to modify one’s personal wish to fit that bill.

And therein lies the problem. People were replying to an article about a key pad bug, and all of a sudden some guy is insulting them because they can't follow the tangent he's gone off on.

I can easily imagine your replies to someone else who's hijacked a thread with their "own personal wish list", and thinks they know better than Apple.

Most of this could've been avoided with a bit of an explanation of what you were wanting to discuss. Insulting the crew doesn't come off very professionally, and seems to have ended up with more than one questioning your mental health...
Quote:
Because that’s the only possible design one could come up with, of course.

What is WRONG with you people?


Can't we all just get along? It doesn't look like you're making any new friends or gaining respect here.

Quote:
I cannot possibly be the only human being in this THREAD, much less overall, who can actually come up with intelligent answers to this problem.

What problem? Your problem? Does it not work?

Your button idea may work, I can see why you're thinking it would be helpful, maybe even in context of removing the keypad so the bug this article was about wouldn't work.

But... there's been plenty of intelligent and thought out responses that make the idea seem unlikely.

Might be time to apologise for your barbs and move on?
Quote:
You Cubans (once again, referring to that joke) have one thought, immediately, with no actual research done to it, and instantaneously dismiss it as bad. No wonder everything you think is wrong!

I see often here people demand research and proof to back up any comment that is disagreed with. For a forum that hardly has anyone (maybe except me of course) using their real name that's a bit much to ask.
Quote:
People with smartphones tend to be literate. The buttons would have words on them. It’s literally this simple to comprehend.

Do you have a smart phone?

I've been reading here since 2010.

I've read previous threads you've been part of.

I'm aware you use a 1st or 2nd gen iPhone as an iPod touch equivalent. Most here seem to assume you have a working iPhone.



Hope I haven't offended you here. That's not my intention. You've started an argument in such a public place though.
post #110 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by SinisterStone View Post

I really don't see the issue? Per the iPhone user guide: Emergency calls
Make an emergency call when iPhone is locked. On the Enter Passcode screen, tap Emergency Call (to dial 911 in the U.S., for example).
Important: You can use iPhone to make an emergency call in many locations, provided that cellular service is available, but you should not rely on it for emergencies. Some cellular networks may not accept an emergency call from iPhone if iPhone is not activated, if iPhone is not compatible with or configured to operate on a particular cellular network, or (when applicable) if iPhone does not have a SIM card or if the SIM card is PIN-locked. In the U.S., location information (if available) is provided to emergency service providers when you dial 911.
With CDMA, when an emergency call ends, iPhone enters emergency call mode for a few minutes to allow a call back from emergency services. During this time, data transmission and text messages are blocked.
Exit emergency call mode (CDMA). Do one of the following:
• Tap the Back button.
• Press the Sleep/Wake button or the Home button.
• Use the keypad to dial a non-emergency number.

Does anyone read manuals anymore? No where does it say this feature is for only calling 911. The only 'bug' I see is the crash the phone clearly recovers from when pressing the dial button a ridiculous amount of times.
post #111 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by SinisterStone
Does anyone read manuals anymore? No where does it say this feature is for only calling 911. The only 'bug' I see is the crash the phone clearly recovers from when pressing the dial button a ridiculous amount of times.

You've obviously missed this post...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Durandal1707 View Post


Fortunately, it is a bug. If you even bother to spend 5 seconds trying it yourself, and dialing a random number into the emergency dialer, you'll quickly see that as designed, doing this simply results in a message saying "867-5309 is not an emergency number." So the programmers, in fact, were not stupid enough to deliberately make any arbitrary number dialable from the lock screen. It's just a bug. Which is good, because if they actually were clueless enough about security to make the lock screen worthless on purpose, they'd all deserve to be fired.
post #112 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by SinisterStone View Post

Does anyone read manuals anymore? No where does it say this feature is for only calling 911. The only 'bug' I see is the crash the phone clearly recovers from when pressing the dial button a ridiculous amount of times.
It's certainly not only for calling 911 as 911 isn't the only emergency number in the world. It's also not supposed to be able to call Papa John's to order a large meat lovers, hence the bug status.
post #113 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post
It's also not supposed to be able to call Papa John's to order a large meat lovers, hence the bug status.

 

What, you mean late night starvation attacks are not an emergency? :D 

post #114 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by iRon man View Post

You've obviously missed this post...
You are correct I did miss that post and thank you it makes more sense now.
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