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Apple to reportedly extend AppleCare+ coverage for international travelers

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
It was revealed on Tuesday that Apple has changed the terms and conditions tied to AppleCare+ and will be lifting geographic limitations on support, meaning travelers can get their device serviced outside of their home country.

AppleCare
Reportedly leaked AppleCare+ document regarding iPhone service. | Source: Sonny Dickson


As noted by TechCrunch, the recent policy change allows owners to take in products for repair in any country where AppleCare+ is offered, lifting previous restrictions that limited service to the country in which the plan was purchased. Devices include the iPhone, iPad, iPod, Apple TV, Apple displays and Mac models.

It should be noted that replacements and repairs may not be offered in all countries. The publication offers the CDMA version of the iPhone 5 as an example, pointing out the handset can't be serviced or replaced in countries where it is not sold, like Brazil.

In a related development, blogger Sonny Dickson posted two documents pertaining to the upcoming AppleCare+ changes to Twitter. One of the "leaked" pages, seen above, notes that international servicing for the iPhone 5 will begin on Friday.

The changes are likely part of Apple's continued effort to overhaul its post-sales service. When the iPhone 5s and 5c were unveiled on Sept. 10, it was announced that the AppleCare+ for iPhone per-incident deductible would be raised to $79, up from $49 previously.

Currently, AppleCare+ for iPhone, iPad and iPod is offered in Austria, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland, the UK and the US.
post #2 of 16

Yes! At last. It would be even better if warranty issues could be less regionalised.

post #3 of 16
This is great news. Once upon a time, I purchased a not so cheap Nokia (from a Nokia store) in Stockholm that went bad on me in Melbourne. I was told I had to ship it back to Sweden.

Now if I can just figure out why that IOS 7 upgrade didn't waterproof my iPhone 5 like the Interwebs said it would...
post #4 of 16
I never had any problem getting warranty work overseas.

Between 2003 and 2006 I lived in Osaka, Japan and took my Titanium Powerbook G4 with me. During that time, I had my logic board, hard drive, battery and display replaced while under my extended Applecare. In fact, when I had my logic board replaced in '03, the Shinsaibashi Apple Store had not yet opened, so I had the service done at an authorized repair center in some back alley of Nipponbashi. No issues at all.

The US Apple Store even replaced a 1st gen Nano that I bought in Japan.

I guess now it's official.
post #5 of 16
This report is flawed. AppleCare and AppleCare Plus are different products. AppleCare is and has always been international. If someone has an issue with their device they can get it serviced anywhere in the world where Apple Certified technicians are available.

AppleCare Plus is different. In the past if someone had an incident of accidental damage (AppleCare Plus covers accidental damage and is only available for iPhone, iPad, and now iPod Touch - standard AppleCare does not cover accidental damage and is available for all of Apple's electronic devices) then that person had to get their service performed in the country of origin because not all countries offer AppleCare Plus and therefore, I assume, weren't set up for the deductible payment program.

So as far as AppleCare goes there is no change. If you have a warranty issue you can, and always have been able to, get your device repaired wherever you are in the world that there is an Apple Authorized Service Provider. With this change to AppleCare Plus you can now get your accidental damage covered in another country that also offers AppleCare Plus. If that country doesn't offer AppleCare Plus it would appear you would still have to wait until you get home (or have a layover in a country that offers it).

Does anyone read their terms and conditions anymore? Did they ever? TLDR is not an excuse for ignorance!
post #6 of 16
I am a heavy international traveller who has had a number of repair needs over the course of the last 10 years, and I have never been turned down from AppleCare and in each case the computer was definitely not repaired in the country of origin. I have also always been told by Apple that any "portable" device (aka.. not your Mac Pro or iMac) is covered by all Apple Care facilities.

So... what is different?


Update: Thanks to @Enigmamatic for giving a nice explanation.
post #7 of 16
This is good news.

I have travelled a fair bit, and the problem often tends to be only with iPhones. Most of the other apple products (esp. the macbooks and iPads) are already serviced internationally.

But, with iPhones it is a problem. Infact, recently an iPhone gifted to me by my brother got a speaker problem. When I took it to the Apple authorized service center they refused to even look at it, even though I offered to pay whatever it takes, just because it wasn't bought locally.

Hopefully, that should not happen anymore after this change. Paid service for an apple product should be available anywhere irrespective of where you buy it.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosujin View Post

I never had any problem getting warranty work overseas.



Between 2003 and 2006 I lived in Osaka, Japan and took my Titanium Powerbook G4 with me. During that time, I had my logic board, hard drive, battery and display replaced while under my extended Applecare. In fact, when I had my logic board replaced in '03, the Shinsaibashi Apple Store had not yet opened, so I had the service done at an authorized repair center in some back alley of Nipponbashi. No issues at all.



The US Apple Store even replaced a 1st gen Nano that I bought in Japan.



I guess now it's official.

 


Computers & iPods were never a problem with the worldwide warranty.
iPhone/iPads had different cellular stuff for different countries.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamnemani View Post

This is good news.

I have travelled a fair bit, and the problem often tends to be only with iPhones. Most of the other apple products (esp. the macbooks and iPads) are already serviced internationally.

But, with iPhones it is a problem. Infact, recently an iPhone gifted to me by my brother got a speaker problem. When I took it to the Apple authorized service center they refused to even look at it, even though I offered to pay whatever it takes, just because it wasn't bought locally.

Hopefully, that should not happen anymore after this change. Paid service for an apple product should be available anywhere irrespective of where you buy it.

 

The issue with iPhones (and GSM/CDMA iPads) could be a bit complicated.

 

For a particular model of iPhone (5, 5s, 5c, etc.), there are actually several different part numbers depending on a particular country's provider radio frequency specs. Here is Apple's most recent phone model breakdown: http://www.apple.com/iphone/LTE/

 

It could be the case that, technically, an iPhone from another country may operate on a frequency that is un-assigned (or even outlawed) in the country where the device is being serviced. In this case, some overseas model-specific parts may be prohibited for sale in other countries. I could see Apple being forced to service of a phone that does not conform to local radio standards.

 

I wonder what happens if an issue such as this arises. 

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enigmamatic View Post

This report is flawed. AppleCare and AppleCare Plus are different products. AppleCare is and has always been international. If someone has an issue with their device they can get it serviced anywhere in the world where Apple Certified technicians are available.

 


Unless it was an iPhone or an iPad.
Warranty stated that they may not be able to be repaired in other than the country of purchase.
post #11 of 16
This could be a boon for Amazon's Apple sales. A friend of mine in UK recently was delighted to be able to buy a high end studio monitor headphones on the US Amazon web site and have delivery to his door in the UK. Amazon took care of taxes and import duties and the savings were around £130 (UK pounds - approximately $1.6). Now with this change at Apple, I am sure he will be looking into Apple gear sourced the same way. I doubt Apple would do this however removing Applecare support limitations just made this moot. On a down side of the Amazon route, US Tourism will take a small hit. I know tons of folks for other countries that have a Florida vacation, arriving with an empty suitcase and returning with a ton of new clothes and Apple gear.

Unless of course small print states owner's residence must be in country of purchase thus limiting this strictly to travelers.
Edited by digitalclips - 9/25/13 at 4:12am
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post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

On a down side of the Amazon route, US Tourism will take a small hit. I know tons of folks for other countries that have a Florida vacation, arriving with an empty suitcase and returning with a ton of new clothes and Apple gear.

Unless of course small print states owner's residence must be in country of purchase thus limiting this strictly to travelers.

I remember even years ago some of our South American clients arriving at our FBO with pretty much empty planes and leaving with electronics of all kinds stacked as heavy as the rules would allow.

'Course we had a few other South American aircraft arriving pretty full too. . . 1rolleyes.gif
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post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosujin View Post

The issue with iPhones (and GSM/CDMA iPads) could be a bit complicated.

For a particular model of iPhone (5, 5s, 5c, etc.), there are actually several different part numbers depending on a particular country's provider radio frequency specs. Here is Apple's most recent phone model breakdown: http://www.apple.com/iphone/LTE/

It could be the case that, technically, an iPhone from another country may operate on a frequency that is un-assigned (or even outlawed) in the country where the device is being serviced. In this case, some overseas model-specific parts may be prohibited for sale in other countries. I could see Apple being forced to service of a phone that does not conform to local radio standards.

I wonder what happens if an issue such as this arises. 

It's actually the provisioning that tells the device what frequencies to use and what software is allowed to run on what phones. All iPhones are the same. If you buy a phone in say, Saudi Arabia, it will not have FaceTime installed because that kind of software is illegal. If you come to America and get your phone swapped the AMERICAN phone that you get will not have FaceTime on it automatically when you activate it because the network tells it not to allow access. Even if you put in a US SIM card. The system knows you originate from Saudi Arabia and that's the phone you bought so that's the phone you get.

It's like magic.

This is about payment and not the technology. That's all.

Also, service is more complicated with the phones because not all third party service centers are allowed to service phones. You usually have to go to an Apple Store.

That's how I understand it anyway. Years in the telecom business have made this easier to understand. But it is admittedly confusing!
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I remember even years ago some of our South American clients arriving at our FBO with pretty much empty planes and leaving with electronics of all kinds stacked as heavy as the rules would allow.

'Course we had a few other South American aircraft arriving pretty full too. . . 1rolleyes.gif

Why do I have a mental picture of Glen Fry as the pilot of such a plane and the singing the backing track …? 1wink.gif
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post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Why do I have a mental picture of Glen Fry as the pilot of such a plane and the singing the backing track …? 1wink.gif

You pretty much nailed it.
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post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enigmamatic View Post

It's actually the provisioning that tells the device what frequencies to use and what software is allowed to run on what phones. All iPhones are the same. If you buy a phone in say, Saudi Arabia, it will not have FaceTime installed because that kind of software is illegal. If you come to America and get your phone swapped the AMERICAN phone that you get will not have FaceTime on it automatically when you activate it because the network tells it not to allow access. Even if you put in a US SIM card. The system knows you originate from Saudi Arabia and that's the phone you bought so that's the phone you get.

It's like magic.

This is about payment and not the technology. That's all.

Also, service is more complicated with the phones because not all third party service centers are allowed to service phones. You usually have to go to an Apple Store.

That's how I understand it anyway. Years in the telecom business have made this easier to understand. But it is admittedly confusing!

It is not provisioning or the insertion of a SIM card that makes an iPhone choose what group of frequencies to utilize. There are hardware variations among iPhones sold in various countries.

This page will show at least 4 different iPhone 5s model numbers depending of the group of LTE bands supported: http://www.apple.com/iphone/LTE/

Your iPhone model is printed on the back cover of your phone and can be compared with this list: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT3939
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