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Adonit, Evernote team up for fine-point Bluetooth stylus for iPad

post #1 of 43
Thread Starter 
Two firms buoyed by the success of iOS devices ? Evernote and Adonit ? have teamed to make a premium stylus that will bring precision writing to the iPad.



The new Jot Script Evernote Edition is a result of a partnership between the two firms, one aimed at bringing the natural feel of pen-and-paper writing to iOS devices. A central feature of the device is its 1.9-millimeter tip, which provides a much finer point of contact than most other styluses.

The new Jot Script is composed of stainless steel, aluminum, and plastic, with an aluminum and stainless steel end cap and a thermoplastic polymer resin tip. The thin barrel of the device features a textured grip meant to make the Jot Script feel like a regular pen. It measures 5.55 inches long and 0.46 inches in diameter, and it weighs in at 29 grams with a battery inserted.



The stylus is designed to take a single AAA battery, and one is included along with the device. That single battery, Evernote and Adonit claim, will give the Jot Script "over two weeks of pen-down writing time."

The stylus connects to an iOS device via Bluetooth 4.0 and Bluetooth Low Energy. Devices with Bluetooth 4.0 support can also access the Jot Script's palm rejection and advanced precision capabilities. Palm rejection allows the touchscreen device to ignore input from anything other than the pen tip when a user is writing.

The new stylus is available on both Evernote's new marketplace and directly from Adonit. The device is still in preorder stage, and it will ship on October 25. Both companies offer the Jot Script Evernote Edition for $80.
post #2 of 43
I think I'm going to get one of these - affordable and useful...take that! Samsung GalaxyNote.
post #3 of 43
I would never have told Stevo this, but I actually like using a rubber tipped pen on my iPad. It kept the screen free of smudges.

That is when I remembered it or could find where I left it last.

I know this product is more advanced that what I have but $80 seems high.
post #4 of 43
I remember Steve saying "if you see a stylus, they blew it". But, I'm sure it has its place.
post #5 of 43
I'd be very interested in how they did this. It was my understanding that the sdk automatically filters out tiny impressions as noise. That's why all the styluses currently out use a fat rubber ball. It makes a big enough impression for the ios sdk to say.. "yeah that's a finger not noise". I wonder if the sdk now lets the app decide what to filter out. Alternatively maybe there's a fine location detection functionality in BT 4.0 I'm not aware of? Anyone know?

The Samsung note stuff uses Wacom's technology for the fine tips. That's a whole different ball of wax.

Adobe and Adonis have a similar product with a fine tip coming out btw. That one has pressure sensitivity which this one doesn't seem to have. That's a deal breaker for me. Pressure sensitive, fine tip, and ipad = sketch pad and would be great for artists and designers.
Edited by Serendip - 9/27/13 at 10:23am
post #6 of 43

Apple give us a damn stylus!  $80 unreal.  A pen has a place.  Build in true stylus support and let the 3rd party make pens.  Apple being stubborn yet again.  

post #7 of 43
Originally Posted by Kung Fu Guy View Post
Apple give us a damn stylus!

 

Why?

 
$80 unreal.  A pen has a place.  Build in true stylus support and let the 3rd party make pens.  Apple being stubborn yet again.   

 

Except no. Why does Apple have to do anything for third parties to create their own capitative styluses? I can see Apple giving them the hard specs on the screen so they can tailor their products to the iPad specifically, but there’s no need for Apple to waste its time on this. Stubborn? Stubborn is idiots refusing to get rid of physical keyboards on phones. Stubborn is idiots keeping VGA on their motherboards fourteen years after DVI superseded it (luckily VGA support ends next year). Stubborn is claiming a stylus is needed for touchscreen use (you’re not; I’m referencing the old models).

 

Would I prefer a stylus for drawing? Yeah; that’s why I have my Wacom tablet. But just for drawing. I’d love to be drawing directly on what I’m looking at, but it only takes a few hours to get used to doing it the split way. Eventually we’ll have desktop computers on which we can directly draw, by virtue of multitouch screens. But though Apple will make them, they won’t make styluses for them. Because it’s a terrible solution to an already solved problem, and a niche outside of that.

Originally posted by Marvin

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post #8 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Why?

 

Except no. Why does Apple have to do anything for third parties to create their own capitative styluses? I can see Apple giving them the hard specs on the screen so they can tailor their products to the iPad specifically, but there’s no need for Apple to waste its time on this. Stubborn? Stubborn is idiots refusing to get rid of physical keyboards on phones. Stubborn is idiots keeping VGA on their motherboards fourteen years after DVI superseded it (luckily VGA support ends next year). Stubborn is claiming a stylus is needed for touchscreen use (you’re not; I’m referencing the old models).

 

 

 

This did make me chuckle.... The real world can't afford to update kit with every whim and tremor of technology. A stylus is essential for so many jobs which the iPad could be capable of doing admirably, I can't understand why Apple haven't already made one charged us the Earth for it. The finger is great for making impressions in wet clay tablets but as a real, ACCURATE writing or sketching tool on an iPad, it's bloody useless.

post #9 of 43

would love to make my iPad my lab notebook... make it able to easily insert photos, tables and other files and do handwritten annotations of the fly and I'm in :)

post #10 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

Why?

 

Except no. Why does Apple have to do anything for third parties to create their own capitative styluses? I can see Apple giving them the hard specs on the screen so they can tailor their products to the iPad specifically, but there’s no need for Apple to waste its time on this. Stubborn? Stubborn is idiots refusing to get rid of physical keyboards on phones. Stubborn is idiots keeping VGA on their motherboards fourteen years after DVI superseded it (luckily VGA support ends next year). Stubborn is claiming a stylus is needed for touchscreen use (you’re not; I’m referencing the old models).

 

Would I prefer a stylus for drawing? Yeah; that’s why I have my Wacom tablet. But just for drawing. I’d love to be drawing directly on what I’m looking at, but it only takes a few hours to get used to doing it the split way. Eventually we’ll have desktop computers on which we can directly draw, by virtue of multitouch screens. But though Apple will make them, they won’t make styluses for them. Because it’s a terrible solution to an already solved problem, and a niche outside of that.

 

The right tool for the right job.    

 

I don't want a phillips head on my hammer, just because other people fasten with screws.   But I have no problem with buying an electric driver when the job calls for it. And it may require Torx bits, or a #3 driver.   And I certainly don't want to go to the store only to find that to get a replacement hammer, I have to spend $20 more for a electric driver bundled in, and it isn't better than what's on the open market, and doesn't accept Torx bits.   It's junk in the drawer.

 

I certainly don't want Apple to put a Square CC reader on every iPad.   I may like them, but I only need it for about 2% of my iPad work, and I can't see the extra cost buying me or other value the 99.999% of the time it's not being used.

 

Heck, even $80 isn't much for a good stylus… The good ones now, are $20-30 bucks and aren't that great.  Integration via Bluetooth to the Evernote app.    Excellent.  I don't use Evernote… Great… I don't need to buy this…. but maybe now it does the job I want it to do…. hmmm?

post #11 of 43
If a stylus is a "terrible solution to an already solved problem", why does the Wacom tablet still exist and why is it considered indispensable to graphic designers, art directors, advanced photoshop/illustrator users, etc.? Calling that market "niche" as if it's irrelevant is like calling Whole Foods irrelevant because it's not Sears.
post #12 of 43
Stylus's do have their place. They shouldn't be needed for every day use (that's "blowing it"), but great to have for writing/drawing. When Samsung devices ship with one--and a small-pint one at that--it's a legitimate value to some people (and a fun gimmick for others). I use a cheap fat-tip one on my iPad for sketching out ideas occasionally.

Great to see the iOS styluses advancing. I'll still wait another generation or two, but something with a fine point would be nice!
post #13 of 43

The tip looks awfully short: should one worry about accidentally scratching the glass surface with the metal rim right above it, if the stylus is held at slightly too much of an angle?

 

Or is that of no concern...

post #14 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by resnyc View Post

why does the Wacom tablet still exist and why is it considered indispensable ...

How many do they sell? 

post #15 of 43

Bought. Will be perfect with the new iPad 5. 8-)

post #16 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banyan Bruce View Post
 

 

This did make me chuckle.... The real world can't afford to update kit with every whim and tremor of technology. A stylus is essential for so many jobs which the iPad could be capable of doing admirably, I can't understand why Apple haven't already made one charged us the Earth for it. The finger is great for making impressions in wet clay tablets but as a real, ACCURATE writing or sketching tool on an iPad, it's bloody useless.

The better analogy is Ctrl-Alt-Del.  Why after 30 years is that the standard secret handshake with a tool?    We got rid of chokes on cars (on some we got rid of keys), eliminated operators for dialing phone calls, but in 'rapidly advancing technology'  we still require the most non-intutive clumsy way of literally acknowledging we need to start using this semi-prescient device?

 

Yet, you're going to tell me it's essential to the job of computing… almost EVERY job?

 

 it's just a fancy stick, which we used 60,000 years ago to draw stuff.  We only started using a stick because the ground and the rocks caused our fingers to get bloody.   It took us 10,000s of thousands of years to perfect the drawing stick, and now you have a fancy stick that only works on a computer?   

 

And the computer can feel my finger and allow me to do the same thing?   Tell me again, why this stylus isn't a just a tremor of technology?   If you feel you need one, then get one for yourself… I've got fingers, and I've got sticks… I don't need one for this computer.

 

To the point.

 

You have to learn how to use a stylus.   Our brains are wired to use our fingers accurately… more accurately than keyboards or mice…  

 

It's the reason my my dad uses an iPad, but couldn't use a PC… he couldn't type, couldn't do the remote hand/eye for the mouse, and a stylus… his handwriting is terrible (Yes, he is an MD)… He spent 8 years learning how to operate a scalpel and 40 years perfecting it, but couldn't write a legible clinical note, using a tool he spent 28 year prior as his primary communications tool.   I know he couldn't use a stylus… 

 

This is the key to the UI.   It's as close to natural as you can get.   Apple has 'doubled down' on that,  speaking, shaking, touching.

 

To offer alternatives is to offer confusion.  If you know you need it, you have after market options.  If you don't Apple isn't trying to clog your brain with "Do I need RAID 0 or RAID 5 controllers for your SATA drivers on your iPad, and do you want a PS/2 or USB mouse… or are you going to use a Stylus?"    They are all impediments to getting to the 'Purchase Now' button.

 

2 other nits in your discussion...

 

'Accurate Writing' has little to do with the device, but the story that's up in the head.   (which leads me to Siri….as story tellers we are oral in tradition;-) 

 

Accurate Sketching is a contradiction in terms. 'Sketch' is "a quick, rough drawing that shows the main features of an object or scene" (websters).   I'll bet you most seasoned designers don't use a stylus when they sketch, why should common folk?

post #17 of 43
Quote:

Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

 

You have to learn how to use a stylus.   Our brains are wired to use our fingers accurately… more accurately than keyboards or mice…  

 

That's why we write essays, tests et. al. in school with our fingers. Oh, wait a minute, we don't. 

 

I'm going to use it with the stylus to add notes to PDF files for my study so I don't have to print out hundreds of pages each week. Thankfully, app developers are not as ignorant as some people here.

post #18 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by resnyc View Post

Calling that market "niche" as if it's irrelevant is like calling Whole Foods irrelevant because it's not Sears.

 

I'd be willing to bet that for every 100 iPad owners, 99 of them do see styluses as irrelevant.

post #19 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serendip View Post

I'd be very interested in how they did this... etc...

 

Yeah, my thoughts too. Perhaps the tip is firing/ emitting a sort of pulse to make/ fake a bigger impact?

Agree with lack of pressure being a bummer for artists..

post #20 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by resnyc View Post

If a stylus is a "terrible solution to an already solved problem", why does the Wacom tablet still exist and why is it considered indispensable to graphic designers, art directors, advanced photoshop/illustrator users, etc.? Calling that market "niche" as if it's irrelevant is like calling Whole Foods irrelevant because it's not Sears.

 

you've identified 0.1% of the iPad target market.  the other 99.9% don't want it or don't know what it would do for them.  Building into the OS  tablet/stylus support is a waste of time for the great majority and counter to primary iPad design goals ('all you need is a finger or a voice')

 

Niche to Apple is irrelevant from a retail/wholesale perspective.  It's not like Apple is Anti Stylus, just not wasting time building it into every nook and cranny of the UI.

 

Your analogy is weak sauce (and Walmart would have been the wiser choice than Sears).  Would you require the UN to make sure that Whole Foods is mentioned a global solution... Why?  Because it's a great solution for the Beamer Crowd in Schaumberg or London (or London Ontario….It's not even in French Speaking Canada yet!), so the people in Somalia should get a coupon for organic greek yogurt  in their next air drop of dried milk and beans and rice?  Walmart at least has the price point more in line with global costs of living, and already has the infrastructure to support multiple languages and cultures, and also sells socks and sleeping bags… other things critical to the survival.

 

So yes, in that mode… Whole food is niche compared to a Walmart.

 

 

I'm done… 

post #21 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post
you've identified 0.1% of the iPad target market.  the other 99.9% don't want it or don't know what it would do for them... etc...

 

Yeah it's a niche. Agree. Solid. Done.

 

I'm an animator, and a lot of my friends are artists too, so me and most of my friends are in that niche. We have Wacoms, Cintiqs and stuff. I can however imagine what it must be like outside my little world. And styluses does not take part in it. So therefore I don't make a fuzz about it, and go buy my expensive Cintiq.

 

But just to disturb the balance in the niche concept being painted in this thread..

Kids. Preschool. Learning. Writing.

I'm sure they're learning how to type on paper and by finger painting big letters on an iPad. But with a pen, all these kids learn-to-write apps (that are very popular and high grossing) would make more sense. So instead of 0.1% niche we might be looking at a 5-10% niche? I'm not saying Apple should have done it in the first place. But I'm glad somebody finally went ahead and did it, whether pressuring Apple to open up the SDK or finding another clever solution without Apple's cooperation.

I welcome the fine tip pen!

post #22 of 43

When they get the iPad drawing lag down to about 10ms, this would be great. Until then, I think it's a waste of money.

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post #23 of 43
Originally Posted by GadgetCanadaV2 View Post
When they get the iPad drawing lag down to about 10ms

 

At what is the lag now? And isn’t that dependent on the app being used?

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #24 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post
 

But just to disturb the balance in the niche concept being painted in this thread..

Kids. Preschool. Learning. Writing.

I'm sure they're learning how to type on paper and by finger painting big letters on an iPad. But with a pen, all these kids learn-to-write apps (that are very popular and high grossing) would make more sense.

 

Now, think a bit more about it.  Kids that age do not need a fine-tip, Bluetooth-capable pen which costs $80 if they break or lose it.  Or worse, drips battery acid into their mouthes if they chew on it.

 

So, we now see that this niche market for styluses has further subdivisions:

 

- Professional artists who want very high-resolution, pressure sensitivity, fast response, interchangeable tips, etc

- Hobbyist artists who are willing to forgo some of those advanced features in favour of a lower cost

- School children who require simple to use, safe, rugged, and not a big cost if they lose it

 

Which one does Apple design their stylus for?

 
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post #25 of 43

A dumb question (well, two): is there any iPad software out there that allows me to notate/write on an iPad Keynote slide? And, does that show up on the projected screen if connected via HDMI (i.e., not AirPlay)?

post #26 of 43

This would be great if it had degrees of sensitivity, but sadly, no. 

Why can't we get a stylus with a fine point, palm rejection AND multiple levels of sensitivity? As it is, this is only for writing, not drawing and that seems to have limited appeal.

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post #27 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post
 

 

Yeah it's a niche. Agree. Solid. Done.

 

I'm an animator, and a lot of my friends are artists too, so me and most of my friends are in that niche. We have Wacoms, Cintiqs and stuff. I can however imagine what it must be like outside my little world. And styluses does not take part in it. So therefore I don't make a fuzz about it, and go buy my expensive Cintiq.

 

But just to disturb the balance in the niche concept being painted in this thread..

Kids. Preschool. Learning. Writing.

I'm sure they're learning how to type on paper and by finger painting big letters on an iPad. But with a pen, all these kids learn-to-write apps (that are very popular and high grossing) would make more sense. So instead of 0.1% niche we might be looking at a 5-10% niche? I'm not saying Apple should have done it in the first place. But I'm glad somebody finally went ahead and did it, whether pressuring Apple to open up the SDK or finding another clever solution without Apple's cooperation.

I welcome the fine tip pen!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by auxio View Post
 

 

Now, think a bit more about it.  Kids that age do not need a fine-tip, Bluetooth-capable pen which costs $80 if they break or lose it.  Or worse, drips battery acid into their mouthes if they chew on it.

 

So, we now see that this niche market for styluses has further subdivisions:

 

- Professional artists who want very high-resolution, pressure sensitivity, fast response, interchangeable tips, etc

- Hobbyist artists who are willing to forgo some of those advanced features in favour of a lower cost

- School children who require simple to use, safe, rugged, and not a big cost if they lose it

 

Which one does Apple design their stylus for?

 

I would argue that for most people, 'learning to write' on an iPad is a massive luxury.  a 10 cent pencil or crayon and a 2 cent piece of recyclable paper is the right tool for that 5-10%.   If you can buy the app, great, but from apple's perspective, adding stylus into the OS doesn't solve this problem better, and will raise the cost of entry to exclude people from using it.

 

Really,  A stylus inserts a machine between you and the computer.  And as alluded, 'which machine' should Apple support?

a 3 button stylus (draftsmen love a button on a stylus)

a 3d (air) stylus  (why limit it to 2d… I wave a baton in the air… Look at me… I'm Leonard Bernstein!")

a stick stylus [yep… just a dumb stick]

bluetooth enhanced….

a left handed stylus.

a paint brush stylus

 

now.  even simpler…   Look at Apple's Design Mantra.

 

We already have 3 control methods

If you were to have a choice… will you

1) Drop Siri for Stylus controls?

2) Drop finger controls for Stylus?

3) Drop motion controls for Stylus?

 

Assuming that the cost of adding the aforementioned stylus will increase the complexity and therefore support costs and instability 

and limit some other function being added in the future.

 

This is about saying 'no'.   The hard part of design.   

 

Can you live with out touch controls… no.   motion controls… not really, voice… that's the holy grail….  stylus… that's just a form of touch….  it's gone.

 

Does Apple sell Game controllers? the biggest grossing apps are games….

Huger niche. (if that makes sense).

 

So  Why a Stylus… in the OS?  really.  What job does it solve for over half the current users… Half of the next 100 million users?  Serious question.  

post #28 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by alex101 View Post
 

 

That's why we write essays, tests et. al. in school with our fingers. Oh, wait a minute, we don't. 

 

I'm going to use it with the stylus to add notes to PDF files for my study so I don't have to print out hundreds of pages each week. Thankfully, app developers are not as ignorant as some people here.

Ignorance is borne of considering yourself and/or immediate cohort as defining the facts of the matter, and ignoring the rest.   

 

The argument is not the app devs (and most of them don't use styluses… so you just call all those developers ignorant?), but apple must support Stylus as part of the UI  experience, and build it into OS.   There is a huge set of reasons not to, but suffice it to say, your financial situation allows you to ignore those reasons.   

 

Carry on.

 

btw, unless you're dictating, you're using your fingers…. oh wait… yes you are. 

post #29 of 43
For those wondering how this works, why not just check out the relevant product page at Adonit's website?

I'd love to see a comparative review of this, and pressure-sensitive alternatives like the Jot Touch 4 and Wacom Intuos Creative Stylus. Given that Adonit have a pressure-sensitive stylus I guess the pressure-sensitive tech and the fine-tip tech are incompatible; I wonder if it will continue to be so or if ultimately it's possible to combine the two?
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post #30 of 43
Pressure sensitivity will probably be available in a version 2 stylus or a software update so there is a paid upgrade path.
post #31 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

I would never have told Stevo this, but I actually like using a rubber ...

And that's where I stopped reading your post. 1wink.gif

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post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kung Fu Guy View Post

Apple give us a damn stylus!  $80 unreal.  A pen has a place.  Build in true stylus support and let the 3rd party make pens.  Apple being stubborn yet again.  

Stubborn? Where was "stubborn" when Apple sold the Newton?

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post #33 of 43

There are iOS styluses (styli?) coming from Wacom imminently. Adobe is launching one too. Prior to this, Adonit was one of the few parties in this game. Why the sudden interest from multiple parties? What took so long?

post #34 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


And that's where I stopped reading your post. 1wink.gif

 

You've something against protection? ;)

post #35 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post


Stubborn? Where was "stubborn" when Apple sold the Newton?

 

Somewhere in California, I heard.

post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by websnap View Post
 

This would be great if it had degrees of sensitivity, but sadly, no. 

Why can't we get a stylus with a fine point, palm rejection AND multiple levels of sensitivity? As it is, this is only for writing, not drawing and that seems to have limited appeal.

 

Wacom is releasing a pressure sensitive stylus for iPad soon. So is Adobe. And Adonit already has one, I believe.

post #37 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by websnap View Post

 
This would be great if it had degrees of sensitivity, but sadly, no. 


Why can't we get a stylus with a fine point, palm rejection AND multiple levels of sensitivity? As it is, this is only for writing, not drawing and that seems to have limited appeal.

Wacom is releasing a pressure sensitive stylus for iPad soon. So is Adobe. And Adonit already has one, I believe.

Indeed. But the pressure-sensitive styluses have large nibs. websnap was wondering why we can't have a small nib and pressure sensitive at the same time. I pondered the same thing a few posts ago.

In terms of why the "sudden" glut of more advanced styluses, it would seem that bluetooth 4 is an enabling technology for this and that hasn't been built-in to iOS devices for that long.
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post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post


Indeed. But the pressure-sensitive styluses have large nibs. websnap was wondering why we can't have a small nib and pressure sensitive at the same time. I pondered the same thing a few posts ago.

In terms of why the "sudden" glut of more advanced styluses, it would seem that bluetooth 4 is an enabling technology for this and that hasn't been built-in to iOS devices for that long.

 

Indeed, the Wacom Intuos stylus has a large nib. But, the Adonit Jot Touch stylus already has a fine nib. I believe the Adobe offering will feature the same, too.

 

Interesting point about BT4 being the enabling feature. But exactly how were previous versions of BT inadequate? Is this because of the lower power consumption of BT4?

post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post

But, the Adonit Jot Touch stylus already has a fine nib

Not really. The Jot Touch has an intriguing solution, but it isn't a fine nib like the Script. The part of the Jot Touch that actually touches the iPad screen is a fairly large plastic disc, but this is transparent so you can more easily see where the centre of the stylus is going. It's very clever but from viewing a few video reviews on YouTube it does seem to create some problems.
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post #40 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by resnyc View Post

If a stylus is a "terrible solution to an already solved problem", why does the Wacom tablet still exist and why is it considered indispensable to graphic designers, art directors, advanced photoshop/illustrator users, etc.? Calling that market "niche" as if it's irrelevant is like calling Whole Foods irrelevant because it's not Sears.

Perhaps that is the solution he was talking about....
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