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What's left for the Macintosh in a Post-PC iOS World? - Page 2

post #41 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Rather then call it a post-PC world, it's more of a post-desktop world. I love it!!

Desktop sales had been dropping in comparison to the notebook for years before the iPad came along. The modern tablet is hurting both desktop and notebook sales. There are just too many people that don't need either, or at least not enough that they will update their "PC" as often as they would before now that they can buy an iPad.
post #42 of 253
How will this affect the Mac mini? Will I have to buy an Intel NUC in a few years if Apple cancels it?
post #43 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

In fact, if you check out Apple's site, it is possible to have the laptop ship to you with Windows installed, in place of OSX.
 

 

Maybe you can provide a link for this configuration from apple.com. Given Apple's brand protection tendencies, I cannot believe this is true.

post #44 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post


With regards to the Mac going away; It's the desktop Mac that is losing sales, not the laptop. Apple's laptops, especially the MBA, are doing fine. The build quality is so much better then the other brands that most of the Apple laptops eventually end up running Windows. In fact, if you check out Apple's site, it is possible to have the laptop ship to you with Windows installed, in place of OSX.

Rather then call it a post-PC world, it's more of a post-desktop world. I love it!!

I have an iMac and had a rMBP 15". Just sold the macbook because we never use it. Still use the iMac quite a bit. I actually think the laptop will be gone before the desktop. Although we're still talking severall years.

2014 27" Retina iMac i5, 2012 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air 2, iPad Mini 2, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

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2014 27" Retina iMac i5, 2012 27" iMac i7, 2011 Mac Mini i5
iPad Air 2, iPad Mini 2, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6, iPod Touch 5
Time Capsule 5, (3) AirPort Express 2, (2) Apple TV 3

Reply
post #45 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

With regards to the Mac going away; It's the desktop Mac that is losing sales, not the laptop. Apple's laptops, especially the MBA, are doing fine. The build quality is so much better then the other brands that most of the Apple laptops eventually end up running Windows. In fact, if you check out Apple's site, it is possible to have the laptop ship to you with Windows installed, in place of OSX.

Please post a link from Apple's site offering to install Windows. I looked and it wasn't there, including pretending to buy one.

 

Also, where is your evidence that most Apple laptops end up running Windows. I'm calling pure BS on that. It is true, however, that the best machine to run Windows (at least pre 8) is the Macbook Pro. That has been proven by a PC publication.

post #46 of 253

Interesting and well thought out article.

 

iOS is a subset of OS X so a convergence is very possible, whether likely or not. There is currently cooperation as I experience using the iPad as a controller for Logic Pro X where I can do things on the iPad that are impossible without it; eg, I can strum a guitar chord convincingly on the iPad with sounds from Logic that sound very convincing, and I can control Logic remotely from a proper music station. Such cooperation and mutual reliance can only move forward. Whether convergence will happen only time will tell.

post #47 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

Why are the article's apostrophes coming up as question marks?

This site is best viewed with an IE6 browser...
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #48 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by WardC View Post

Seriously...what I had in mind for this implementation of "multi-touch" technology was not a stand-up iMac or vertical display.

It is a large-screen "table top" computer...large 24" 27" or 30" display, multitouch running Mac OS X or a variant of iOS for desktop use and desktop application use.

Such a technology has already been demonstrated by Microsoft.

This is a large, multi-touch surface that is a computer....like a giant iPad, that sits flat on the table or at a slight angle tilt. The reason that multi-touch for desktop has been debunked is because the vertical situation of a computer monitor is not a comfortable computing experience for an extended period of time. Something more like this "tabletop computer" is much more natural, like using an iPad on a table or with a smart cover stand to elevate it slightly....but a MUCH MUCH larger surface...something you could edit FinalCut movies on or run Adobe Photoshop on....

I have yet to see Apple go in this direction. The iPads are so tiny, I cannot believe Apple has not made a larger surface touch computer at this point. But, the way I see it...tabletop computers are where the future of multitouch computing is.

Forward head posture would go from bad to worse. We already sit too much looking down as it is.
post #49 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheElectricChairRepairman View Post

Maybe you can provide a link for this configuration from apple.com. Given Apple's brand protection tendencies, I cannot believe this is true.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Gramze View Post

Please post a link from Apple's site offering to install Windows. I looked and it wasn't there, including pretending to buy one.

Also, where is your evidence that most Apple laptops end up running Windows. I'm calling pure BS on that. It is true, however, that the best machine to run Windows (at least pre 8) is the Macbook Pro. That has been proven by a PC publication.

Well, dip me in dog shit, I can't find that option now, either. It may only be available to certain large volume buyers. I remember if from Windows 7 days.
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #50 of 253

Just great! I really appreciate these "Weekend" articles! :)

 

It's a good thing I don't work for Apple, b/c I think the MBA is perfect. I don't see how they can improve it. But, I'm sure they will.

 

The iMac is the most beautiful desktop ever. Again, maybe they can make an edge to edge screen and once and for all get rid of the "chin!" But, even if they don't, I wouldn't mind.

 

iOS7 and OSX iLife/iWork are wonderful.

 

As much as I would love to just only have an 5s and an iPad Mini as my only tech. I think I will have to buy the 27" iMac and an 11" MBA.

 

Soon though, very soon, I think I will need the iMac and the MBA less and less! :)

post #51 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by akqies View Post


Desktop sales had been dropping in comparison to the notebook for years before the iPad came along. The modern tablet is hurting both desktop and notebook sales. There are just too many people that don't need either, or at least not enough that they will update their "PC" as often as they would before now that they can buy an iPad.

 

I agree with you. I'm still running an orig. white intel 20" iMac with SL. And an iP4s. 

 

My purchasing plans are: 5s, iPad Mini and when the iMac dies, probably an MBA 11" and then, maybe a 27" iMac. But, doubtful on the iMac.

post #52 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post


I have an iMac and had a rMBP 15". Just sold the macbook because we never use it. Still use the iMac quite a bit. I actually think the laptop will be gone before the desktop. Although we're still talking severall years.

 

Interesting. It's still hard for me not to see the iMac as the digital hub. And when my 7 year old iMac gives up the ghost, it would indeed be hard to see replacing said digital hub with an MBA.

 

I like what Apple is trying to do with iCloud and I would love to have only SSD devices, 5s, iPad Mini, and maybe an MBA...but its my damn cable company's high cost and slow speed that makes me worry about accessing everything online. I don't have a lot of faith in them.


Edited by christopher126 - 9/28/13 at 7:02pm
post #53 of 253
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

Why are the article's apostrophes coming up as question marks?

 

Go to Safari > Preferences > Appearance > Default Encoding's drop down menu and choose Western (Mac OS Roman) if your running Western (ISO Latin 1). Worked for me. 

 

You may have to close Safari and reopen for changes to take effect. :)

 

Best

post #54 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post


Forward head posture would go from bad to worse. We already sit too much looking down as it is.

 

Agreed! I'm very close to getting a stand up desk with a treadmill for my iMac and a recumbent bike for when I'm watching F1, Tiger or tennis and movies. 

post #55 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

Why are the article's apostrophes coming up as question marks?

 

Because Kasper's Automated Slave is written by idiots who know nothing about properly translating CP-1252 Extended ANSI characters to UTF-8. One way to avoid this mess when writing articles is to STOP USING MICROSOFT WORD.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #56 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy Mac View Post
 

Augmented reality technology will most likely be the 'convergence' of desktop/mobile.

AR is just now budding out of it's infancy - but I imagine we are still 5 years or more away from having it replace conventional 'displays'.

 

 

I think that Jony Ive alluded to this at the end of the iOS7 video.   AR will manifest using Parallax and iBeacons in the mobile sphere.  

post #57 of 253
The market shifts and it's been a little hard to predict. Here's my take FWIW.

1. Laptops are obviously where the desktop computing has been shifting since the power inside a portable device is getting to the point where it does enough and people want that portability.

2. Desktops will still be here. Apple makes a decent amount of money and they are just updating their products normally as new processors come out and other advancements for those devices. But due to the newness and the portability people find that a tablet is enough, or a smartphone is enough.

3. I still think that as Apple opens up more stores in China and other countries, it will open up more desktop and laptop sales in the long term. Just because there's a retraction of unit sales for a year doesn't predict a long term sales growth. Things come and go in different cycles.

4. Obviously, the PC desktop and laptop haven't seen anything more than the incremental advances. On the top end Thunderbolt, but that's geared more towards the high end market until compelling devices come out for the masses. Otherwise it just incremental advances in CPU/GPU processors, faster RAM, faster SSD, faster WiFi and maybe some new screen technology in the next year or two.

5. Apple is now on a yearly OS update path now and I don't know what major changes in the desktop they could make to make the desktop/laptop compelling enough for people to buy them in the manner in which they already are. Most of the development is going in the tablet development for software especially.

6. I think there will be more growth coming from countries that are coming up to speed in the desktop/laptop markets and China seems to be an area set for growth for Apple. As they open up more stores, they increase their business for all products from what I can tell.
post #58 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post
 

 

Because Kasper's Automated Slave is written by idiots who know nothing about properly translating CP-1252 Extended ANSI characters to UTF-8. One way to avoid this mess when writing articles is to STOP USING MICROSOFT WORD.

 

A bit harsh! Probably right on the crappy Word use! :)

post #59 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by dacloo View Post

To me the future is convergence done well. A desktop OS requires a different GUI metaphor than a mobile one. Apple is doing this right (exceptions like the dreadful scrollbar inversion and stupid Launchpad left aside).

What I see is that the iPhone 7 or so will be able to transform into a desktop OS by hooking it up to your monitor. You essentially get an evolved version of OSX. When you disconnect, it just uses the iOS portion.

Content and settings are shared through the local and remote filesystem. Let's hope iCloud makes sense by then.

 

Well said...I like the idea of one "brain." Imagine iPhone being the brain and you have a monitor at work and at home. The iPad just becomes another monitor and you don't have to have a large SSD on your iPhone b/c all your stuff is in the cloud.

post #60 of 253
I think it would be nice to see a convergence of some kind between iOS and OS X but there isn't a logical progression towards it. The Mac still misses out on important software and support due to the small marketshare and iOS or mobile in general doesn't get many fully fledged apps due to sandboxing (no scripting outside Javascript, shared file access), the UI, the mobile limitations etc. There is a divide between the two and to bridge the gap would require compromises to both designs.

You can't put the windowed OS X UI into a tablet because it doesn't work on such a small screen or with touch. You can't easily cut off a shared filesystem, scripting capability and implement the same kind of sandboxing in OS X as iOS because it would kill a productive environment.

Dealing with x86 and ARM is another hurdle. If they moved everything to x86, they are stuck with Intel's pricing, rollout schedule and the tech being available to competitors. Even at the lowest-end, Intel charges far more for their chips than companies can source ARM chips and would make them completely non-competitive with anyone using ARM. If it was possible, there would be no such thing as Windows RT because they'd simply use cheaper Intel x86 chips. If Apple moved everything to ARM, we take a few steps back to the PPC era where we deal with software incompatibility, the inability to run Windows natively again, having to get new versions of all productive software, command-line tools and drivers, as well as losing some of the IO standards mentioned in the article.

Tim said quite explicitly that they don't see a convergence between iOS and OS X happening. Obviously iOS is a form of OS X anyway so the other possibility is for iOS to make OS X redundant. The way it would do this is by becoming capable of the same productive tasks that OS X currently is. This would either require scripting technologies and certain languages to die out or for there to be a less constrained version of iOS - one that by default ships as a consumer OS but has a configuration mode to allow you to set it up as a productive OS.

The benefits would of course be far cheaper Macs and laptops that run longer on battery and can even be passively cooled. It comes with a lot of risks though because if it fails to support productive workflows fully, those tasks just stop being possible on the Mac platform. I think developers and users care too much about the user experience Apple's OS offers to let that happen though and would jump through a lot of hoops to make any productive workflow feasible somehow, even if it meant relying heavily on server-side services.

It's also a consideration whether or not Apple needs to or wants to do this. People who rely on productive workflows aren't huge in number. The PC audience is huge but how many of them have PCs for the wrong reasons? They may need a big screen but the software doesn't have to be Windows nor the hardware x86. Would having a productive OS bring them over any more than plain old iOS?

Perhaps Apple just needs a low-end ARM laptop and desktop that runs iOS at lower price points to bring those people over from Windows. But then they'd have to map an older interaction scheme onto iOS. It works as the iOS simulator shows but a 3D gesture space would help. For the foreseeable future, I think iOS and OS X will have to co-exist as is. This works out very well from a security point of view because it limits the range of possible attacks on a large number of people.

I'd like to see a productive touch OS though. I don't like the keyboard and mouse at all and I'd like to see some replacement that still works horizontally with a surface but is not a fixed state. I don't like how commands are all mapped to binary presses of letters of the alphabet, productive software should be more contextual like the iPad is. I would like to be able to run a stick over the desk to draw on the screen like a Wacom but with no extra hardware and at the same time, have precise control over the rest of the functions just using my hands. This could be done by just lying the screen flat but that's not enough. Ideally the display won't dictate how people interact with the software but the Google Glasses route doesn't work either.
post #61 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

The iPad is a consumption device from the beginning. The entire embedded space is a consumption solution with mobile needs.

To think it's replacing the desktop/laptop instead of providing a natural extension is ludicrous.

 

I take your point, but, I think most people are just using the iPad for email, facebookie, photos, video and surfing. Pretty much what they were doing when they had a PC "truck" under their desk. 

 

I don't know about everyone else, but I'm using my iMac less and less and my iPhone and iPad more (Just sold my iPad 2 to get a Mini). I'm using my printer less and less. I mean a lot less! :)

 

Granted you're not going to create the movie "Gravity" on iPad, but for the vast majority of people the iPad is the future not the PC under the desk or even a laptop for that matter.

 

Everything I do is more fun on the iPad.

post #62 of 253

I would love to be able to take a small iMac off of it's stand and draw directly on it, edit photos directly on it, CAD, for music, take to school, work.  There are a lot of applications that would benefit from being touch enabled that require more power that what is available on the iPad.

I can see the Mac being touch enabled sooner than later. 

post #63 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by akqies View Post


Steve Jobs said it best when he said, "PCs are going to be like trucks. They are still going to be around but one out of x people will need them."

Most users simply never needed all that other crap that comes with a desktop OS for their typical usage needs and the proof is the success of the iPad.

I see Apple creating a ARM based content server for the home.   It will share content with ARM iDevices/screens from iPhone to AppleTV. using Airdrop and Airplay.  Content creation will be done using iWork and iLife and will be saved locally as well as iCloud. 

 

 

Professionals and Prosumers will still need and use Intel/OSX "trucks" with Pro level creation software: Aperture, FCP, Logic Pro etc., .

post #64 of 253

An iOS iPad-based desktop with a mouse and keyboard interface appears to be the answer to a majority of consumers who want a fairly powerful machine at home, but don't really need a full-blown PC.  Arm-based, it should be cheaper than an iMac or a mini.

 

The ipad is very capable.  It can do video.  it can do word processing.  It can do a lot of things a desktop can do.  Take the portability out and sell it as a new line of desktop machines without touch, but with a power supply, stand, keyboard, and mouse and what do you have?  Can Apple do this for less than the cost of a mini or MBAir with a display (or without)?  If so, it would really be post-PC.

post #65 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by akqies View Post

DED, I love what you did by making the next Mac Pro the period on the question mark but I think you missed an opportunity to really tie it together.
 

 

It doesn't make sense either, every Mac here is an all-in-one, then the odd man out Mac Pro, Mac Pro belongs in a different lineup.

 

And look at the internals, theres 2 GPUs in the Mac Pro, workstation, server class CPU, 1866Mhz RAM, SSD only, and buy your own monitor, its hardcore computing and sure sounds a lot more expensive than iMacs.


Edited by murman - 9/28/13 at 7:48pm
post #66 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by dacloo View Post

To me the future is convergence done well. A desktop OS requires a different GUI metaphor than a mobile one. Apple is doing this right (exceptions like the dreadful scrollbar inversion and stupid Launchpad left aside).

What I see is that the iPhone 7 or so will be able to transform into a desktop OS by hooking it up to your monitor. You essentially get an evolved version of OSX. When you disconnect, it just uses the iOS portion.

Content and settings are shared through the local and remote filesystem. Let's hope iCloud makes sense by then.

 

Ubuntu seems to be pursuing this idea with their Ubuntu Touch project, at the heart of which is a user interface that automatically configures itself depending on the display size. Even if their execution doesn't work out, it may be an idea worth considering by a party with more resources and existing mindshare.

 

Edit: quoted the wrong post.


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 9/28/13 at 8:31pm
post #67 of 253
I strongly echo the previous comment regarding the speed of hard drive connections via USB 2.0 versus USB 3.0. Asserting that USB 2.0 is "faster than virtually any hard drive" either means that you haven't had much experience with USB 3.0 drives, or you weren't paying much attention.

I routinely copy gigantic HD video files between standard 5400 rpm external drives, and the difference in speed between copying USB 3.0 - to - USB 3.0 versus USB 2.0 drives is like night and day. USB 3.0 just flies. Its also a godsend when I make my weekly bare-metal MacBook Pro backups to 7200 rpm drives; I no longer have to knock myself out finding external drives with FW800 support.
post #68 of 253
I'm interested to know what people think about apple not updating the wifi to 802.111ac on the iPhone 5s?
post #69 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post
 

 

Because Kasper's Automated Slave is written by idiots who know nothing about properly translating CP-1252 Extended ANSI characters to UTF-8. One way to avoid this mess when writing articles is to STOP USING MICROSOFT WORD.

 

Especially when they can write it in TextEdit.app or any basic VIM format and let the CMS manage the formatting.

post #70 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post
 

An iOS iPad-based desktop with a mouse and keyboard interface appears to be the answer to a majority of consumers who want a fairly powerful machine at home, but don't really need a full-blown PC.  Arm-based, it should be cheaper than an iMac or a mini.

 

The ipad is very capable.  It can do video.  it can do word processing.  It can do a lot of things a desktop can do.  Take the portability out and sell it as a new line of desktop machines without touch, but with a power supply, stand, keyboard, and mouse and what do you have?  Can Apple do this for less than the cost of a mini or MBAir with a display (or without)?  If so, it would really be post-PC.

 

Video and Word Processing on any tablet is GARBAGE next to a Desktop/Laptop and you know it.

post #71 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post
 

 

I take your point, but, I think most people are just using the iPad for email, facebookie, photos, video and surfing. Pretty much what they were doing when they had a PC "truck" under their desk. 

 

I don't know about everyone else, but I'm using my iMac less and less and my iPhone and iPad more (Just sold my iPad 2 to get a Mini). I'm using my printer less and less. I mean a lot less! :)

 

Granted you're not going to create the movie "Gravity" on iPad, but for the vast majority of people the iPad is the future not the PC under the desk or even a laptop for that matter.

 

Everything I do is more fun on the iPad.

 

In short, you're just a consumer who never had a true need/high demand for productivity and thus the iPad/iPhone suits you, until you get to work when you actually can't get work done without the desktop/laptop.

 

Anyone in professional engineering, applied sciences, etc., who proclaims the iPad replaces their workstation better expect to be laughed out of their respective profession. It's not a replacement. It's another tool.

post #72 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Especially when they can write it in TextEdit.app or any basic VIM format and let the CMS manage the formatting.

The article was written in TextEdit
post #73 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkyMark7 View Post

I strongly echo the previous comment regarding the speed of hard drive connections via USB 2.0 versus USB 3.0. Asserting that USB 2.0 is "faster than virtually any hard drive" either means that you haven't had much experience with USB 3.0 drives, or you weren't paying much attention.

I routinely copy gigantic HD video files between standard 5400 rpm external drives, and the difference in speed between copying USB 3.0 - to - USB 3.0 versus USB 2.0 drives is like night and day. USB 3.0 just flies. Its also a godsend when I make my weekly bare-metal MacBook Pro backups to 7200 rpm drives; I no longer have to knock myself out finding external drives with FW800 support.

Note the context of mobile devices and calm down slightly.
post #74 of 253

Profits are what drive everything in business. With fewer desktop sales each year there might be an interesting change in the computer business. Intel and AMD might stop their investment in making better desktop chips. They could shift their focus to mobile chips. With that done the existing fast desktop chips might not get updated at all. I believe such a time is coming.

post #75 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by leesmith View Post

To beat Microsoft on the desktop, you go after Office. Beating Microsoft is a much easier proposition than beating Google.
Exactly, it needs to be enterprise worthy. It need better paragraph numbering and markup.
I've often wondered if Apple has lingering contractual restraints for the deal Steve Jobs made with MS in the late 90s.
Another strategy would be to buy an engineering platform like Solidworks and/or autoCAD
post #76 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwmac View Post
 

The one thing that worries me about the new Mac Pro is I haven't heard even one word about price. I understand the maxed out one costing a pretty penny but I wonder if Apple will make one also affordable at the entry level as they used to do so often in the past. If they make an entry level model around $2,100 +/- a few hundred I could really see them selling well. If the low end basic model is over $2,500 then it will simply be  overpriced for many people. I expect the fastest one with maxed Ram, HD, and top of the line GPU card to cost well over $5,000 but interested to see how many price points/configurations will be available. 

 

Given that the Mac Pro is designed and marketed as a premium pro product targeted toward a relatively small customer base, at least as compared to the broader consumer market, and given that it is being manufactured stateside where production costs are higher, I wouldn't hold out much hope of a modest entry point. After all, the current Mac Pro starts at $2,499 w/ 6GB of memory, 1 TB hard drive, and 1 GB graphics card. I think many pro users would consider these specs to be inadequate, particularly for video production. The current high end Mac Pro maxes out at over $11,000.

 

Of course, many medium to large design and video production shops can likely justify the premium by recouping the investment, while small shops or individual designers cannot. That is why many creative professionals find the iMac is good enough for their needs.

 

Expandability is another issue entirely. One of the main arguments for the Mac Pro has been its internal expandability. It'll be interesting to see how pro users react to the new Mac Pro as it has moved expandability outside the box. 


Edited by AweWyld - 9/28/13 at 11:30pm
post #77 of 253

My take:

1. Notebook business will be there and desktop business will be there, they both have their own markets and both markets are essential.

 

2. Microsoft will come out with their next OS (which may be good) and Apple will continue to lead the standards with the next versions of OS X. Therefore, PC business will be there and so will be Mac business (the only difference will be that Macs will continue to outsell PCs at a significant rate).

 

3. Touch screen notebooks and desktops are ridiculous according to me. The modern computer was defined by Apple II, and it will continue to be the standard for decades to come. Computers simply have a different usage pattern and application as compared to the more intimate mobile devices. Therefore a mouse, trackpad and a keyboard are the ideal input devices on a desktop or a notebook computer, and a touchscreen is the ideal input device on a smartphone or a tablet.

 

4. Though convergence of OS X and iOS is possible, it will not happen, especially in a company like Apple that understands ergonomics. If you want a proof of disaster of convergence, look at Windows 8 (and it's not even a complete merger, just the UI confluence alone proved disastrous enough).

post #78 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post


In a sense, Apple did that. If you remember how Jobs introduced the iPhone: He said, "Today we are introducing a new iPod, and new computer, and a new phone... then he repeated it several times...until the audience got that it was one device.

With regards to the Mac going away; It's the desktop Mac that is losing sales, not the laptop. Apple's laptops, especially the MBA, are doing fine. The build quality is so much better then the other brands that most of the Apple laptops eventually end up running Windows. In fact, if you check out Apple's site, it is possible to have the laptop ship to you with Windows installed, in place of OSX.

Rather then call it a post-PC world, it's more of a post-desktop world. I love it!!

 

I agree. I haven't owned a desktop in over a decade. The Power Mac G4 was my last desktop. It was replaced by a MacBook and then a MacBook Pro. My late 2008 Macbook Pro, upgraded with an SSD, has aged very gracefully. It benchmarks at about 25% of the current top MacBook Pro. Usage is split equally between my laptop and my iPad.

 

My brother-in-law, who works in the computer industry, a lifelong dedicated Windows user at home and at work, just bought a Retina MacBook Pro and loves it. He always argued cost without giving adequate weight to value. Of course value is individual and in part subjective, particularly in regards to the user experience. The only thing is, I had to remap the Control and Command keys for him. Baby steps.


Edited by AweWyld - 9/28/13 at 11:38pm
post #79 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

You can't create an iOS app on an iOS device. You need a Mac to do that. Artists, videographers, designers all need large screens and Macs.

Apple will simply scale-down the Mac business accordingly.

Exactly!

The author of the article overlooks or ignores that even OS X Macs were never regarded as PCs. This is a post-Windows world.

Also, Microsoft proved that all that most computer "hobbiests," as they used to be known, were interested in was games. And I commend Apple for developing a high-class mobile iOS for people who only need a peashooter-powered computing device to engage in social networking, and play their games, to get them through the day.

Otherwise, when iOS mobile devices get as powerful as a desktop computer, and iOS merges into OS X or vice versa, I'll buy an iOS mobile device and use it with a large screen.
post #80 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Commodification View Post

A larger screen iPad model would erode Window sales even further.

 

It think many digital artists would love to get their hands on a larger iPad, as long as the weight was kept in check. It would also need to have pressure sensitivity built into the hardware, either licensed from Wacom or Apple's own tech. Since I'm dreaming, why not throw in tactile feedback through the use of haptic technology to distinguish the texture of various virtual surfaces. Wacom has Cintiq, but it is a specialized purpose-built input tool that is neither portable nor inexpensive.

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