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What's left for the Macintosh in a Post-PC iOS World? - Page 3

post #81 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

Have you seen the Mac Pro "theatrical trailer" actually play before a movie?

3 times so far.

If you haven't seen it, you either haven't gone to the movies this summer or you've arrived late. And I think it plays just prior to the movie previews.

Each time, my date asks, what is that? During the trailer. Each time, I was only so happy to say "just wait"

And they thought "all that for a computer? Must be really cool" or something along those lines.

Come to think of it, you can tell Apple is enticing the Hollywood production crowd quite a bit this way as well as targeting your Everyman movie goer. Pretty smart.

Looking forward to picking one up at launch. Still need price details though.
Edited by 9secondko - 9/28/13 at 11:49pm
post #82 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post
 

iOS7 and OSX iLife/iWork are wonderful.

I mostly agree. When I updated from Snow Leopard to Mountain Lion I ditched Office 2001 for Mac and started using Numbers for work on both my MacBook Pro and iPad. It has been a mostly pleasant and productive experience. There are, however, some odd UI and feature inconsistencies between the OS X and iOS versions, as well as some formatting translation errors. It is time Apple put some serious resources into updating iWork on both platforms and bring the iCloud version out of beta. Btw, Apple recently started offering the iOS version for free on new device purchases. I remember shopping around and finding prices ranging between $800 and $1200 for Office 2001 for Mac! It was my first and only regret when I switched from PC to Mac and briefly considered going back to Quattro Pro and Lotus 1-2-3.

post #83 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

Apple used to install Pro towers powering HDTV displays at every opportunity in its retail stores. The ability to set up a relatively cheap, turn key video wall of several HDTVs would be an interesting market opportunity.  

They also did that in their Executive Briefing Center:


Quote:
Originally Posted by scoony View Post

I'm interested to know what people think about apple not updating the wifi to 802.111ac on the iPhone 5s?

.ac wouldn't be of any use over .n because the bottleneck is with the NAND controller.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

 

Because Kasper's Automated Slave is written by idiots who know nothing about properly translating CP-1252 Extended ANSI characters to UTF-8. One way to avoid this mess when writing articles is to STOP USING MICROSOFT WORD.

Especially when they can write it in TextEdit.app or any basic VIM format and let the CMS manage the formatting.

1) Ironic, isn't it. A site dedicated to Apple, who puts every effort into the smallest details, and we get this crap.

2) Slavery is still in effect, This 'Kaspers' Automated Slave' was probably used in the spirit of good humor, but I'm not laughing.

3) Weird that DED always defends himself in these threads, this time telling us it's written in TextEdit.app
I’d rather have a better product than a better price.
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I’d rather have a better product than a better price.
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post #84 of 253

I hate all of you who said Apple should scale down their Mac business, how long did it take Apple to update the Mac Pro? You want that to happen to all Macs? If Apple wanted market share, they could join the race to the bottom, which means shitty Macs, so that option is no good. On the contrary, I think we all know Apple will make Retina screen iMacs and displays at some point, which means they are expanding up market, there is no need to scale down anything. Yes more people are buying iPads over Macs, so what happens if these customers want to buy a Mac at some point and find its all 4 year old hardware? Buy a Windows machine from Sony or Lenovo instead? F*** no, theres a Mac for that.

post #85 of 253

Mac desktop are doing just fine. Is this site running out of stories to write? First is Android taking over iOS and tablets...now this? Really?

 

Tablets can not replace desktops in serious work tasks, at least not yet. The decline in desktop numbers just reflect consumers' usage for internet connection from desktop to tablets for daily simple tasks like checking email and social media. No need to hit the panic button!

 

Come back again when they reports 50%+ drop in world wide sales....then we can really talk about death of personal computers.

post #86 of 253

PC will be around for a long time. These are serious computers not i pad minis which to me is just a joke!

post #87 of 253
for me cursor computing is dead.

once we've tried multi-focus touch computing, using a mouse or any trackpad flavour is counter-intuitive. the convergence seems inevitable, and knowing apple, it is already real in some secret room both ways - though probably osx will end up being a rosetta-like feature in ios more than the other way around.

convergence seems to require a gentle transition for developers, though again i trust this is already happening in most of the big names secret rooms too. it is definitely a question of time on that side. and in practice it requires the right hardware, at the right time, made right like only apple seems to be able to now. the newton was premature, and so would a flag touch-desktop at this point. but one-system is the way to go.. for me we will have the pleasure of having ghosts and aliens in the same game=). personally i cant wait

apple user since 1983..

IIe, IIc, 128k, Plus, Se/30, IIci, LC, SI, LCIII, PPC7100, G3, iMac Bondi

Newton MP2000, iPod 10Gb / Touch 4g, iPhone / 3G

PowerBook 170 / G3 Lombard / G4 17" 1GHz

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apple user since 1983..

IIe, IIc, 128k, Plus, Se/30, IIci, LC, SI, LCIII, PPC7100, G3, iMac Bondi

Newton MP2000, iPod 10Gb / Touch 4g, iPhone / 3G

PowerBook 170 / G3 Lombard / G4 17" 1GHz

Reply
post #88 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by murman View Post

Yes more people are buying iPads over Macs, so what happens if these customers want to buy a Mac at some point and find its all 4 year old hardware? Buy a Windows machine from Sony or Lenovo instead? F*** no, theres a Mac for that.

The people who work at Apple use Macs to design their software and hardware so unless they figure out how to make iOS devices do both, they'll be sticking with Macs too. The seem to predominantly use Macbook Pros so one move I could see happening down the line is ditching desktops and just going with laptops but it depends on what the market decides.

Last year, Apple made $6b revenue from desktops (4.7m units) and $17b from laptops (13.5m units). So desktops last year represented 25% of the Mac lineup in revenue and units. The revenue there is important. Although iOS devices make up the bulk of their $157b revenue in 2012, Macs were still $23b and it was still growing in 2012. I think it will have stalled this year but there's no reason to turn off $23b of revenue.

In 2011, desktop share was 28%, in 2010, it was 35%, 2009 30%, 2008/2007 40%, 2006 45%, 2005 55%.

In 8 years, the desktop went from 55% Mac share to 25%. What if it reaches 10% and 90% of Apple's Mac sales are Macbook Air and Pro? They can choose to build whatever they want and they need headless servers but I could eventually (over 5 years away) see them just selling laptops and a mini-style ARM server - all you need for the desktop experience really is a large display. Desktop purchases might level out though. The updates will definitely slow down as consumer demand slows down.
post #89 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDRPRTScom View Post

for me cursor computing is dead.

once we've tried multi-focus touch computing, using a mouse or any trackpad flavour is counter-intuitive. the convergence seems inevitable, and knowing apple, it is already real in some secret room both ways - though probably osx will end up being a rosetta-like feature in ios more than the other way around.

convergence seems to require a gentle transition for developers, though again i trust this is already happening in most of the big names secret rooms too. it is definitely a question of time on that side. and in practice it requires the right hardware, at the right time, made right like only apple seems to be able to now. the newton was premature, and so would a flag touch-desktop at this point. but one-system is the way to go.. for me we will have the pleasure of having ghosts and aliens in the same game=). personally i cant wait

Using many applications the precision of a mouse currently is faster and more accurate than anything else for fine detail and manipulation. However, I grant you many of the things done in those same applications would be great done with gestures. I've thought for the last few years that a large screen that lay down on the desk at a shallow, comfortable angle, with OS X and also gesture control would be cool. Graphic design, video editing in the likes of , FCPro, After Effects, PS or Music Applications like LPX and so on, all with the ability to use touch or a mouse whenever and wherever you wished. The on screen contextual key boards and ability to work like 'The Minority Report' (although not on a vertical screen for day to day work for me) whilst still being able to grab a mouse if required would seem a perfect and highly adaptable, creative solution to me.
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
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From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
"Google doesn't sell you anything, they just sell you!"
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post #90 of 253

iOS is based on OSX, actually. These two operating systems were designed from the beginning to be interconnected! They're both based Unix, aren't they?

post #91 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by hentaiboy View Post
 

Look forward to your Gorilla arm

 

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=why-touch-screens-will-not-take-over

 

This. I don't understand the push for touch screen desktops or "convergence." It is exhausting to use a touch screen on a desktop. Where previously I could move a mouse mere millimeters I now have to extend my entire arm. It's silly. Now, I could see at some future point it being useful to have a few touch-enabled elements on a computer...maybe assign my iphone to the left "side" such that if I swipe the screen to the left it "passes" the website/pages/document directly to my phone for continued viewing on the go and vice versa, but only for brief interactions, not for continuous use. One of the advantages of computers is that we no longer have to do with sweat what we can now do with computing. Desktops that exclusively rely on touch screen at the expense of a mouse and keyboard are a step backward, not forward.

 

Related, I was unexpectedly given a Leap Motion device for my birthday (because I wanted to play with one but didn't want to spend the money). I was exhausted after a mere two minutes and I haven't touched it since day one (though the person who gave it to me is awesome and I love that they did).  I can't imagine spending all day straining with a touch screen desktop. I think those who support the idea of touch desktops are not all that in touch with their bodies and their capabilities.  For brief interactions such as swiping information to another device or even calling up weather or a clock...sure. But to replace a mouse? No. A mouse is a fine piece of technology...and the Apple touch mouse is fantastic.

post #92 of 253

I also think part of the problem with declining sales could be down to less frequent upgrades. I have a unibody macbook pro, one of the first ones, and it's coming up to 5 years old now. Yet it still runs well. I don't use it for anything highly intensive but for me needs it's perfect. I know that the new ones are much snappier at launching apps etc, but for me there isn't a need to splash some more money on a new macbook/imac. Instead I bought an iPad and find that suits the majority of my web browsing needs. Whereas my previous computer lasted me all of 3 years and was painfully slow by the end of those 3 years therefore the need for an upgrade was much higher. I could see myself upgrading my 1 year old iPad before I upgrade my 5 year old Macbook Pro. 

post #93 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brakken View Post
 

iOS is based on OSX, actually. These two operating systems were designed from the beginning to be interconnected! They're both based Unix, aren't they?

 

Yes, they share some internals, but there is a fundamental difference in how the two operating systems work. iOS with its individually isolated apps has strayed quite far from the unix philosophy of letting programs work together through inter-app communication. This isn't too important for iOS's current use cases, but it can be hindering when you try to work with more than one program at a time. Here is a nice article from the iOS software firm Ink explaining this issue (http://blog.inkmobility.com/post/60759200492/what-ios-can-learn-from-unix). With OS X, you get the real deal, a bona fide certified UNIX system with full-on interprocess communication and all the standard unix command line tools. Many scientists use OS X for those unix tools. iDevices won't take over Macs until iOS bridges this gap in functionality.


Edited by d4NjvRzf - 9/29/13 at 9:24am
post #94 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

“I think we should use old tech because new tech is expensive.”
False equivalence. USB 3.0 is just as much new tech as Thunderbolt is, but it's quite cheap. Thunderbolt is, OTOH, amazingly expensive.

Thunderbolt also lacks future-proofness, because:

1. Apple removed ExpressCard slots because, supposedly, only a small percentage of users were using it. However, I'd be willing to wager that the number of people using ExpressCard was many times larger than the number of people who are using Thunderbolt for anything other than displays. No one is using Thunderbolt — and we know what Apple does to technologies that no one is using.

2. Thunderbolt is tied to Intel, and Apple will probably eventually start making ARM-based Macs at some point.

I wouldn't be surprised at all if Apple started removing Thunderbolt from future Mac models, and if/when that happens, all those crazy overpriced Thunderbolt devices will be $1000+ doorstops.
post #95 of 253
Without a Mac, Apple will lose it's leading position ...
Today ant the next view years, Apple will still invest in the Mac business.

Does anybody know a better mobile solution than the Air or a MBP?
Nope!
post #96 of 253
Originally Posted by Durandal1707 View Post
False equivalence. USB 3.0 is just as much new tech as Thunderbolt is

 

Former doesn’t do a quarter of what the latter does. It’s old tech and you know it. USB as a format–as a physical construct–has been around since ’96. “It’s faster” doesn’t make it new tech.

 
Thunderbolt also lacks future-proofness, because:

1. Apple removed ExpressCard slots because, supposedly, only a small percentage of users were using it. However, I'd be willing to wager that the number of people using ExpressCard was many times larger than the number of people who are using Thunderbolt for anything other than displays. No one is using Thunderbolt — and we know what Apple does to technologies that no one is using.

2. Thunderbolt is tied to Intel, and Apple will probably eventually start making ARM-based Macs at some point.

 

1. Having what to do with Thunderbolt at all? Thanks for proving you know what everyone (rather “no one”) is doing¡

 

2. Yeah, that co-development sure wouldn’t let Apple do anything with the format, huh¡ 

 
I wouldn't be surprised at all if Apple started removing Thunderbolt from future Mac models, and if/when that happens, all those crazy overpriced Thunderbolt devices will be $1000+ doorstops.

 

Prepare to never be surprised.

post #97 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDRPRTScom View Post

for me cursor computing is dead.

once we've tried multi-focus touch computing, using a mouse or any trackpad flavour is counter-intuitive. the convergence seems inevitable, and knowing apple, it is already real in some secret room both ways - though probably osx will end up being a rosetta-like feature in ios more than the other way around.

convergence seems to require a gentle transition for developers, though again i trust this is already happening in most of the big names secret rooms too. it is definitely a question of time on that side. and in practice it requires the right hardware, at the right time, made right like only apple seems to be able to now. the newton was premature, and so would a flag touch-desktop at this point. but one-system is the way to go.. for me we will have the pleasure of having ghosts and aliens in the same game=). personally i cant wait

I feel the same way. Multitouch renders indirect control obsolete. This is especially obvious when you consider that you can implement indirect control (such as a trackpad) in multitouch. Multitouch is perfectly suited for Apple's pro apps, since they're all essentially decks of controls. Precision control can be solved in a multitouch UI in many different ways. Apple could have released a large, horizontally placed multitouch screen for the Mac for this kind of thing. I think the reason they haven't is only because they have bigger plans. As usual, they want to do it right.

I don't think any of the reasons people cite against multitouch displacing indirect control make sense. Software and hardware limitations will go away. Larger screens will come. Multitouch devices can be combined with other displays and hardware keyboards. Precision control can be solved in software for different tasks. Most pro apps are things that are either obviously better with multitouch (video editing, music, etc) or that many people use with a Wacom tablet already (photoshop, etc). Software development just needs some changes in the OS and the addition of a hardware keyboard (although I'd like to see Apple experiment with touch-based development; touch can solve a lot of the problems with non-text-based development environments). All of this is technically feasible now - just make a horizontal iMac - although perhaps not in the most elegant way. The issue for Apple, I imagine, is that the MacBook would be replaced with some sort of iPad Pro, and it doesn't make sense to build a multitouch workstation until you have moved all portable computing to tablets, since the portable market is bigger.
post #98 of 253
"...like land mammals with gills and fins."

LOL
post #99 of 253

Microsoft rules the PC world while Apple rules the tablet/smartphone world.

post #100 of 253
For the average consumer the Mac still works well as a home-hub for everything else you might be carrying around, and will remain so for at least the next few years. There's really no alternative to that 'hub' at the moment...maybe if Apple releases a full-fledged smart-TV with large amounts of on board storage, or much better (faster, reliable and secure) access to iCloud storage then things will change.
post #101 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

 

In 8 years, the desktop went from 55% Mac share to 25%. What if it reaches 10% and 90% of Apple's Mac sales are Macbook Air and Pro? They can choose to build whatever they want and they need headless servers but I could eventually (over 5 years away) see them just selling laptops and a mini-style ARM server - all you need for the desktop experience really is a large display. Desktop purchases might level out though. The updates will definitely slow down as consumer demand slows down.

 

Ah hah, interesting! What if it doesn't? Here's the thing, MBA is not as powerful as the iMac, neither are MBPs that are in the same price bracket as the iMacs. You trade size and computing power for portability basically, it just depends on personal needs. I think a desktop line is important for Apple to maintain, as an option, as an entry point, as a part of a person's computing toolset, for OSX being a healthy platform. If the iMacs aren't growing, then the Mac Pro is growing even less, but why is there new Mac Pro refresh then? I'm make an example, if say I needed a Mac Pro but Apple no longer sells one, then I would have to go Windows, I would have to invest in the Windows version software that I needed, and get accustomed to the Microsoft way. I wasn't looking for it, totally a happy Apple customer, but Apple would have lost my loyalty, now day in and day out, I'm using Windows and Microsoft services, Apple will fade from my daily activities, even if I don't like Windows, what choice do I have? Same thing with the iMacs. Maybe the form will change when some design revolution comes around and change the face of desktops as we know it, but a desktop solves problems laptops doesn't and vice versa. I don't know all the reasons Apple sell what they sell, but if profits is the main driving force, why sell Macs at all, just make iPhones and iPads.

 

Apple do sell pro software, Final Cut, Logic Pro, Aperture. Not only that, a lot of companies sell pro software for the Mac, if Apple is no longer interested in Macs, boom, these 3rd party pro software will go Windows only, it snowballs into OSX being an irrelevant platform. That's not a good picture for Apple.

 

All the new Macs look pretty good imo, they aren't going away, the Mac Pro is super stylish too, done with drive, spurs enthusiasm. hope I'm not just consoling myself.

post #102 of 253
The "grand unification theory" between OSX and iOS is iCloud. Then consider Apple's vertically-integrated manufacturing and you pretty well guarantee compatibility between two distinct operating systems.

It doesn't matter how you process the bits, so long as the bits are the same between platforms, and the results are the same (or at least familiar enough depending on the platform scale). Add an intuitive experience between platforms and you needn't care how the bits are processed.
post #103 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brakken View Post
 

iOS is based on OSX, actually. These two operating systems were designed from the beginning to be interconnected! They're both based Unix, aren't they?

 

iPhone (1) was advertised as using OSX, then it changed to iPhone OS, then Apple finally realized they have this new iOS. So the idea probably was to do cross-platform compatibility, but the languages were too divergent to do it right. But the theory was also that apps would run on Safari. That didn't pan out either. Apple diverged OSX and iOS because it had to. Developers led the way.

 

iCloud brings them together. If they want to converge something, it should be the iCloud website and control panel, App Store, and iTunes. The iTunes OSX/Windows client would become the iCloud client with all the functions of the aforementioned. iOS would continue to run them as separate apps.

 

This might even pave the way for an iTunes thin client at iCloud.com.

 

($0.02)


Edited by Howie - 9/29/13 at 9:24am
post #104 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post
 
Because Kasper's Automated Slave is written by idiots who know nothing about properly translating CP-1252 Extended ANSI characters to UTF-8. One way to avoid this mess when writing articles is to STOP USING MICROSOFT WORD.

It is not necessarily MS Word that is causing the problem, it is because the original article is not published using UTF-8 however the forum is. The original article has properly encoded html entities but when you use the file_get_contents function in php, which is likely how the automation works, you need to detect the encoding and if needed covert the encoding to whatever character set you are using in the destination web page. 


<?php 
function file_get_contents_utf8($fn) { 
     
$content file_get_contents($fn); 
      return 
mb_convert_encoding($content'UTF-8'
          
mb_detect_encoding($content'UTF-8, ISO-8859-1'true)); 

?>

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post #105 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by hentaiboy View Post
 

Look forward to your Gorilla arm

 

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=why-touch-screens-will-not-take-over

 

I agree with this article. There is a certain screensize that touch can not go above without getting uncomfortable. 10 inches?

 

And that is why Apple (and all the other computer companies) will continue to have a mouse-based OS as one of their platforms.

post #106 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

Dooomed

Just kidding, I won't be getting rid of my mac for at least another 5 years of iOS evolution.
I see a likely merge in the future.

I may not be a big fan of DED, in fact this is another article I couldn't finish reading, but I have to ask did you not grasp what he was saying? The differences between iOS and Mac OS are intentional, this really is key because if the difference are intentional why would the OS's merge? The other thing commoners don't seem to grasp is that much of the two operating systems are identical to begin with. Effectively iOS puts a tiny UNIX like computer in your pocket.
post #107 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post
 
The people who work at Apple use Macs to design their software and hardware so unless they figure out how to make iOS devices do both, they'll be sticking with Macs too. The seem to predominantly use Macbook Pros so one move I could see happening down the line is ditching desktops and just going with laptops but it depends on what the market decides.

Extended use of an non-ergonomic computer screen / keyboard position is very unhealthy. Programming is one of those disciplines that requires prolonged concentration. With your neck bent downward for that length of time is not good.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

 I've thought for the last few years that a large screen that lay down on the desk at a shallow, comfortable angle, 

Same poor ergonomics

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by poke View Post

 Most pro apps are things that are either obviously better with multitouch (video editing, music, etc) or that many people use with a Wacom tablet already (photoshop, etc).

[...]

just make a horizontal iMac - although perhaps not in the most elegant way. The issue for Apple, I imagine, is that the MacBook would be replaced with some sort of iPad Pro, and it doesn't make sense to build a multitouch workstation until you have moved all portable computing to tablets, since the portable market is bigger.

Same, poor ergonomics. Also I find pro desktop apps such as photoshop and video editing use very compact layouts and controls, many nodes no larger than the tip of the cursor arrow which are sometimes difficult to grab with the mouse let alone a big fat finger.

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post #108 of 253
I think most of us can agree that Apple's biggest threat is complacency at this point. As soon as they start to feel invinceable and try to milk the consumer with mediocre upgrades too often that's when they might have a really rude awakening come to them.

I'm concerned that they're already becoming more complacent about consumers continuing to support every minor upgrade and that the pace and drive to innovate has slowed. Sure they've just released iOS 7 and announced a new Mac Pro but both of these only came after sustained and intense criticism for years that the previous offerings were dated and in need of a major overhaul and upgrade. The case was so severe with the Mac Pro that many thought Apple had abandoned or wanted to kill its professional-class desktop, forcing Apple to announce a new model up to 6 months before shipping in an attempt to quash a mass exodus.

In the end Apple responded and responded well but it seems like they're only getting there eventually now whereas before they were always at the cutting edge. I remember the awe with which I beheld an iMac G4 with its screen that floated in the air, could be adjusted with a finger but stayed precisely where you wanted it. It was a thing of beauty and of technical brilliance and I can't help but think the latest displays have gone backwards in positioning at least anyway and just don't inspire the same awe that the original iMacs commanded. I do love the look of the Mac Pro but I doubt very much I can afford to upgrade for a while.

The next things they'll probably respond to only just in time are a larger iPhone and retina screens across the entire lineup of desktop and portable computers and devices. The recently updated iMacs are a complete yawn and they're sure taking their time getting new iPads and MacBook Pros to market, not to mention this Mac Pro and a retina Cinema Display.
post #109 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

 
Because Kasper's Automated Slave is written by idiots who know nothing about properly translating CP-1252 Extended ANSI characters to UTF-8. One way to avoid this mess when writing articles is to STOP USING MICROSOFT WORD.
It is not necessarily MS Word that is causing the problem, it is because the original article is not published using UTF-8 however the forum is. The original article has properly encoded html entities but when you use the file_get_contents function in php, which is likely how the automation works, you need to detect the encoding and if needed covert the encoding to whatever character set you are using in the destination web page. 


function file_get_contents_utf8($fn) { 

     
$content file_get_contents($fn); 

      return 
mb_convert_encoding($content'UTF-8'

          
mb_detect_encoding($content'UTF-8, ISO-8859-1'true)); 


?>

Can I forward this? To:

support@huddler-inc.com

Or will you?

If not, a 1,000 props to you sir!
I’d rather have a better product than a better price.
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I’d rather have a better product than a better price.
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post #110 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Former doesn’t do a quarter of what the latter does. It’s old tech and you know it. USB as a format–as a physical construct–has been around since ’96. “It’s faster” doesn’t make it new tech.
USB is a lot like RS232 in that it may never go away as a tech even if updated often. USB did eventually eclipse RS232 and I expect USB to eventually be eclipsed also. I wouldn't be surprised to see it still in use in 2050 though.
Quote:
1. Having what to do with Thunderbolt at all? Thanks for proving you know what everyone (rather “no one”) is doing¡
Actually TB adoption has been rather quick in my mind. Frankly it is also hooking to monitors that act as hubs or docking stations for laptops so his argument makes absolutely no sense. There is no telling what is hooked up to those monitors / docking stations. Beyond that I believe Apple got 99% of what it wanted out of TB as a docking port.
Quote:
2. Yeah, that co-development sure wouldn’t let Apple do anything with the format, huh¡ 
Intel has as much as said other companies can do whatever to build TB parts. If the PC world isn't it most likely is because they lost their way
Quote:

Prepare to never be surprised.
Or just read and inform yourself. Many of the opinions expressed in these forums would never exist if people actually read for content and actually tried to understand how Macs and iOS devices work.
post #111 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3Eleven View Post

Microsoft rules the PC world while Apple rules the tablet/smartphone world.

And IBM rules the mainframe world (still).

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #112 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Can I forward this? To:

support@huddler-inc.com

Or will you?

If not, a 1,000 props to you sir!

I don't think Huddler is involved in Kasper's automated hack. That is a carry over from pre-huddler.

 

Thanks for the props but I learned that from someone else. (Colenector)

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #113 of 253

Those 900 million iOS apps?  All developed on OS X with Xcode.

Just FYI.

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

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post #114 of 253
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Originally Posted by d4NjvRzf View Post
 

 

Yes, they share some internals, but there is a fundamental difference in how the two operating systems work. iOS with its individually isolated apps has strayed quite far from the unix philosophy of letting programs work together through inter-app communication. This isn't too important for iOS's current use cases, but it can be hindering when you try to work with more than one program at a time. Here is a nice article from the iOS software firm Ink explaining this issue (http://blog.inkmobility.com/post/60759200492/what-ios-can-learn-from-unix). With OS X, you get the real deal, a bona fide certified UNIX system with full-on interprocess communication and all the standard unix command line tools. Many scientists use OS X for those unix tools. iDevices won't take over Macs until iOS bridges this gap in functionality.

IPC is not a "Unix tool", or at least not a tool exclusive to Unix. Is it true that scientists use OS X for IPC and command line tools? True, there are many science apps that require command line interaction. But that is because many of these apps were ported over to the Mac rather than developed for/on the Mac. There is NO advantage to command line control of a science app if a proper GUI has already been developed. As for science apps using IPC, that's neither here nor there. IPC is available on Windows and most other desktop OSes.

post #115 of 253
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post
Actually TB adoption has been rather quick in my mind. 

 

I think so, too.

 

In some of the same way that the Mac Mini was step 2 of the G4 Cube design, Thunderbolt is really just step 2 of ADC. Think about it: power, video, audio, USB, FireWire (Ethernet, everything else anyone could want…), all in one cable. The difference here is this one is a piece of cake to work with and will be available on everything from everyone.

 

Intel really needs to say, “Look, if you want to make boards for our chips, you’ll put Thunderbolt ports on them.”

post #116 of 253
This is a real concern. Thankfully Apple management has expressed the desire not to let the iOS device market get away from them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by s.metcalf View Post

I think most of us can agree that Apple's biggest threat is complacency at this point. As soon as they start to feel invinceable and try to milk the consumer with mediocre upgrades too often that's when they might have a really rude awakening come to them.
Maybe, I haven't seen this of late with either the Mac or iOS device markets. I mean really look at the AIRs, and even the iMac if those are to your liking. Then we have iPhone which has been a hardware powerhouse since it came out.
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I'm concerned that they're already becoming more complacent about consumers continuing to support every minor upgrade and that the pace and drive to innovate has slowed.
I don't follow what you are saying here.
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Sure they've just released iOS 7 and announced a new Mac Pro but both of these only came after sustained and intense criticism for years that the previous offerings were dated and in need of a major overhaul and upgrade.
Most of those complaints came from largely ignorant people, at least with respect to iOS. IOS 7 puts a new face on iOS but it really did little to improve the apps themselves. For example notes app got zero improvements to its creation abilities on iOS devices. Seriously if you are jotting down a note it isn't that uncommon to want to create a list.
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The case was so severe with the Mac Pro that many thought Apple had abandoned or wanted to kill its professional-class desktop, forcing Apple to announce a new model up to 6 months before shipping in an attempt to quash a mass exodus.
I'm not the only one totally perplexed by the handling of the Mac Pro. The lack of effort over the last 4-5 years is pathetic.
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In the end Apple responded and responded well but it seems like they're only getting there eventually now whereas before they were always at the cutting edge. I remember the awe with which I beheld an iMac G4 with its screen that floated in the air, could be adjusted with a finger but stayed precisely where you wanted it. It was a thing of beauty and of technical brilliance and I can't help but think the latest displays have gone backwards in positioning at least anyway and just don't inspire the same awe that the original iMacs commanded. I do love the look of the Mac Pro but I doubt very much I can afford to upgrade for a while.
Apple is on the cutting edge where the sales are. The problem with the Mac Pro and Mac Pro users is the market for desktops collapsed, if it wasn't for Apples laptops we might not even have a Mac division. Does this excuse the apparent lack of interest in the Mac Pro - no but no company has unlimited resources and it is apparent that Apple prioritized other products.
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The next things they'll probably respond to only just in time are a larger iPhone and retina screens across the entire lineup of desktop and portable computers and devices.
You are making an assumption that there is a huge market of those devices. As for retina it will ship when Apple can get the screens in the quantities needed to ship products in the volumes Apple ships.
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The recently updated iMacs are a complete yawn and they're sure taking their time getting new iPads and MacBook Pros to market, not to mention this Mac Pro and a retina Cinema Display.

Really why all the whining? For one what did you really expect out if the iMac? They gave us a port for an SSD and frankly that is a massive improvement. Second; iPads will come when they are ready and frankly when they get the bugs out of iOS7 on iPads. As for Mac Book Pros you do understand that the gating factor here is technology from Intel.

I'm not sure why Apple not getting product out the door fast enough for you is such a factor for the rest of us. I wouldn't worry one bit about the MBP. I'm actually hoping they fix some of the design decisions that made the current one such a piece of crap. For example the MBP needs at least two slots for those PCI Express SSD slots. Oh and they need to pull their heads out of Ass and price the thing decently.
post #117 of 253
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Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post


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:lol:

post #118 of 253
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Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post

There is NO advantage to command line control of a science app if a proper GUI has already been developed.

There are many advantages to the CLI, in any program. Yes yes, just my opinion, obviously, can't say anything about science applications. But il go as far as saying that repetitive tasks can be accomplished way faster in the CLI by typing as opposed to a GUI with a mouse.
I’d rather have a better product than a better price.
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I’d rather have a better product than a better price.
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post #119 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post
 
 There is NO advantage to command line control of a science app if a proper GUI has already been developed. 

I don't know why there is any differentiation between a science app and any other app. I find the primary reason to control things through SSH is to be able to quickly administer a remote machine, especially one that uses text files for configuration such as UNIX-like OSs.

 

For example if I want to add a mail user on the server, I can type two lines of code, verses log in through VNC then login in through the GUI sign on feature, then go to the administration menu, select users, add user, tab from field to field, go to the services menu and restart the mail service, log out.

 

It is about 20 more steps to do it through a GUI.

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post #120 of 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone 
Same, poor ergonomics. Also I find pro desktop apps such as photoshop and video editing use very compact layouts and controls, many nodes no larger than the tip of the cursor arrow which are sometimes difficult to grab with the mouse let alone a big fat finger.

The ergonomic issue is true of vertical screens but is obvious nonsense when it comes to horizontal screens. Working on a horizontal surface is how we worked for hundreds of years before the advent of computers. If it was a very large surface you'd need to be able to rest your hands on it and move your work area around, it would also likely be at a comfortable angle rather than completely horizontal, but those issues are easily solved. There's nothing to stop you having two or more displays regardless: one horizontal touch display and one or more vertical displays. A keyboard is already a horizontal touch surface and one of the least ergonomic devices - the one commonly responsible for repetitive strain problems - is actually the mouse! All those small, repetitive movements can cause serious damage to the hand. The other problem is solved by better UI design.
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