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Google Web Designer chases market established by Apple's iAd Producer

post #1 of 33
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Three years after Apple launched iAd Producer as a way to build interactive ads and other content using HTML5, JavaScript and CSS web standards, Google has launched a beta development tool of its own, which it calls Web Designer.

Google Web Designer


Google announced its plans earlier this year, but has now launched its first Web Designer Beta, to "create engaging, interactive HTML5-based designs and motion graphics that can run on any device."

The tool is designed primarily to create advertising "through any platform" the company notes, naming its own DoubleClick Studio and AdMob ad networks, but also providing a "generic option to push content through any other ad network."

Google's Flash gets the pan



The company specifically highlights the new tool's web standards as working on "any screen," noting "it doesn?t matter how brilliant your work is if people can?t see it. Now everything you create is accessible on any screen ? desktop, tablet or mobile ? without compatibility issues."The fate of Flash on Android turned out to be very similar to the fate of WebM and NFC.

That's a clear allusion to Google's previous efforts to push Adobe Flash as a desktop medium for web ads into the mobile space. The company wasted years in a failed attempt to port Flash to Android as a differentiating feature, and spent lots of resources promoting the idea that iOS was lacking support for Flash playback, before being forced to acknowledge that without iOS, there was no market.

Android ended up with experimental Flash support that never worked on most devices, and didn't last for more than a single Android dessert name before it was terminated with the release of Jelly Bean two years ago. The fate of Flash on Android turned out to be very similar to the fate of WebM and NFC.

Apple & iAd Producer



Apple addressed the primary potential use cases of Flash on iOS initially by working with video producers (including Google's YouTube) to support standard H.264 video for mobile playback, rather than continuing to use the proprietary codecs and wrapping of Flash Videos that had become a de facto standard on the web.

The company next began targeting interactivity and ads with initiatives and tools designed to replace Flash with open web standards: HTML5, JavaScript and CSS. However, by that time Google had shifted from a key Apple partner to a combative opponent.

After relaunching Android 2.0 as an iPhone clone, Google tried to block Apple from entering the mobile ad market by paying an astronomical $750 million to acquire AdMob, then in talks with Apple, which subsequently paid just $275 million to buy Quattro Wireless instead.



The next year, as Google turned its back on open source and web standards by making Android 3.0 closed source and throwing its support behind Flash rather than HTML5 and H.264, Apple's Steve Jobs outlined plans for iAd in iOS 4, designed to fix the problems in mobile advertising by making ads interactive and unobtrusive, and built using web standards.

By the end of the year, Apple released iAd Producer as a development tool for creating iAd content, as AppleInsider had projected that summer.

Since then, Apple has added support for building other web-standards content to iAd Producer, this spring launching version 4.0 supporting development of interactive iBooks Author widgets, iTunes LP liner notes and iTunes Extra DVD-like bonus content for movies.

iAd Producer


And while the media and analysts have tirelessly sought for years to spread the notion that iAd was a huge failure headed for certain doom, Apple itself has been hiring teams of new iAd staff and has expanded the program outside of interactive web ads sponsoring apps to also include audio and video segments that support the new iTunes Radio.

A report by eMarketer in June projected revenue growth for Apple's iAd to reach $213 million this year, increasing to $376 million in 2014 and $623 million in the following year, a compounded annual growth rate of 71.3 percent.

Earlier this month, a report by Ad Age noted that Apple lined up major advertisers for its iTunes Radio launch, including McDonald's, Nissan, Pepsi and Procter & Gamble.

These top brands "paid upwards of $10 million to be exclusive iTunes Radio advertisers within their respective industries through the end of 2013," the magazine reported, adding that Apple is also "readying iTunes Radio -- and its new ad products -- for its wide launch to advertisers at the start of 2014."
post #2 of 33
Of course, google chases Apple.

How do you think they've survived until now? With their stupid Ads $1 per click?!!!

They've been copying Apple all along and those idiots at wall street thank them and jack up their stock price.

....the lack of properly optimized apps is one of the reasons "why the experience on Android tablets is so crappy".

Tim Cook ~ The Wall Street Journal - February 7, 2014

Inside Google! 

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....the lack of properly optimized apps is one of the reasons "why the experience on Android tablets is so crappy".

Tim Cook ~ The Wall Street Journal - February 7, 2014

Inside Google! 

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post #3 of 33

Wow that is really sweet. I'm totally impressed. This is sort of what we were expecting from Adobe. GWD rocks!

 

Check out the YouTube channel for tutorials.

 

http://www.youtube.com/googlewebdesigner

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post #4 of 33

Thanks for the heads up, DED.  I'll be sure to check out Google Web Designer.

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post #5 of 33
The development of the iAd producer app has been nothing short of phenomenal. The early versions were not very useful but Apple persevered. That stick-to-it-iveness has really paid off. I was especially impressed with the iBooks Author widget feature.
post #6 of 33
"The fate of Flash on Android turned out to be very similar to the fate of WebM and NFC."

Wah!? WebM and NFC are both alive and kicking. What are you talking about?
post #7 of 33

Please edit your articles. Repeated sentences, question marks, and so much more. Why do you even take the time to write, if you don't take the time to proofread? 

post #8 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredclown View Post

"The fate of Flash on Android turned out to be very similar to the fate of WebM and NFC."

Wah!? WebM and NFC are both alive and kicking. What are you talking about?

 

It's a DED article so you have to look past the FUD and hyperbole.  He also takes a jab at Android 3.0 as turning its back on the open source community when the source code has been available for almost 2 years.  In the end I think GWD looks like it may be a solid program.  That's the takeaway from the article.  I'm a little surprised to see DED advertising a Google program, but it looks like it can certainly help out some of the developers who read AI.

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post #9 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 

Please edit your articles. Repeated sentences, question marks, and so much more. Why do you even take the time to write, if you don't take the time to proofread? 

 

He explained it in an earlier article. Kasper's Automatic Slave is the culprit. The double sentences are a result of there actually being double sentences in the original article. The fist occurrence is a classic pull-quote where some text from the article is placed larger, usually italic, in an aside box to draw attention to it. The second is in the body copy. The automation does not copy the HTML properly so both instances are included as body copy.

 

The question marks come from conflicting document declarations and mismatched character set configurations between the main site and the forum site. Again it is the Automatic Slave to blame. It can be edited by an Admin but other than that it needs to be fixed in the script.

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post #10 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

 

He explained it in an earlier article. Kasper's Automatic Slave is the culprit. The double sentences are a result of there actually being double sentences in the original article. The fist occurrence is a classic pull-quote where some text from the article is placed larger, usually italic, in an aside box to draw attention to it. The second is in the body copy. The automation does not copy the HTML properly so both instances are included as body copy.

 

The question marks come from conflicting document declarations and mismatched character set configurations between the main site and the forum site. Again it is the Automatic Slave to blame. It can be edited by an Admin but other than that it needs to be fixed in the script.

 

Right, so back to my point, proof read the articles. Not hard. 

post #11 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 

Right, so back to my point, proof read the articles. Not hard. 

 

No silly the article got discombobulated during the automatic transfer from the main site to the forum site and DED is not an admin so he can't fix it.

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post #12 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

 

No silly the article got discombobulated during the automatic transfer from the main site to the forum site and DED is not an admin so he can't fix it.

 

Very simple information 101. If you want to be taken seriously, you have to post articles better than this. If you just want to sell ad space due to click-bait, AI is doing great! 

post #13 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 

Very simple information 101. If you want to be taken seriously, you have to post articles better than this. If you just want to sell ad space due to click-bait, AI is doing great! 

 

Perhaps a volunteer Admin will step up to the plate and fix the text? We used to have an admin who took personal interest in fixing typos but he is no longer doing administration hence we have typos. Personally I can live with the typos rather than the former admin. I simply view the story repeated in forum site as a free courtesy to AI's enthusiastic fans so they don't have to linger on the home page or revisit it to copy out quoted text. I doubt it makes any ad revenue because the typical forum user here is probably running ad blockers unless they are on iOS but either way they wouldn't click on ads anyway. The main site does not have any typos and that is where the ad revenue comes from.

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post #14 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 

 

Very simple information 101. If you want to be taken seriously, you have to post articles better than this. If you just want to sell ad space due to click-bait, AI is doing great! 

 

If you're reading articles on the Forums, there are no ads, so it should all work out for you. 

 

The alternative is to post just the titles in the Forums that you have to go to the actual page to read it.

post #15 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post
 

 

It's a DED article so you have to look past the FUD and hyperbole.  He also takes a jab at Android 3.0 as turning its back on the open source community when the source code has been available for almost 2 years.  In the end I think GWD looks like it may be a solid program.  That's the takeaway from the article.  I'm a little surprised to see DED advertising a Google program, but it looks like it can certainly help out some of the developers who read AI.

 

Don't mistake your own nonsense for what the article states. It does not say Google was "turning its back on the open source community."

 

Google "turned its back on open source and web standards" by closing Android 3.0 for over a year and devoting its attention to promoting Flash proprietary plugins over H.264 and HTML5. So while Apple was successfully promoting H.264 and HTML5, Google was backing a failed web platform to deliver its ads. Which failed as miserably as NFC/secure element Google Wallet and WebM, which even Mozilla abandoned as a video strategy against H.264.

 

I don't see how you work so hard to twist words and hide facts when all you complain about is what you're twisting. Surely you know you're being disingenuous, and that makes your trolling even more hypocritical. 

post #16 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post
 

If you're reading articles on the Forums, there are no ads, so it should all work out for you. 

 

You must be running ad blockers because there are a few ads on the forum pages.

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post #17 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post
 
... WebM, which even Mozilla abandoned as a video strategy against H.264.

WebM is still causing a lot of issues for developers. Google removed support for H.264 from Chrome so now developers need to save a minimum four different versions of each movie - WebM, H.264, Ogg, and FLV. Then double that if you want to deliver a cellular data version. That is a strategy that Google likes because it drives developers to host their video on YouTube to avoid that multiple copy BS, where it generates ad revenue for Google instead of the developers keeping it on their own servers.

 

Mozilla bailed on WebM and H.264 due to potential patent issues not because of any quality issues.

 

If it were not for iOS, the videos wars would end up with Flash as a universal wrapper again, which frankly was a lot easier for developers. 

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post #18 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post
 

 

If you're reading articles on the Forums, there are no ads, so it should all work out for you. 

 

The alternative is to post just the titles in the Forums that you have to go to the actual page to read it.

 

No alternative to proofread? 

post #19 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post
 

 

Don't mistake your own nonsense for what the article states. It does not say Google was "turning its back on the open source community."

 

Google "turned its back on open source and web standards" by closing Android 3.0 for over a year and devoting its attention to promoting Flash proprietary plugins over H.264 and HTML5. So while Apple was successfully promoting H.264 and HTML5, Google was backing a failed web platform to deliver its ads. Which failed as miserably as NFC/secure element Google Wallet and WebM, which even Mozilla abandoned as a video strategy against H.264.

 

I don't see how you work so hard to twist words and hide facts when all you complain about is what you're twisting. Surely you know you're being disingenuous, and that makes your trolling even more hypocritical. 

 

As written, your article implies that Android 3.0 is closed source.  This isn't the case and hasn't been for almost 2 years.  Your post quoted above adds the addendum of "for over a year" which is missing in the original article.  I'm sure it's just an oversight and that you didn't intentionally leave that part out to make it easy for those who are less informed to misinterpret.

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post #20 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post
 

 

If you're reading articles on the Forums, there are no ads, so it should all work out for you. 

 

The alternative is to post just the titles in the Forums that you have to go to the actual page to read it.

 

No alternative to proofread? 

 

Are you really that dense? Why don't you write to Kasper? No one here on the forum, aside from a few volunteer Admins, has any ability to correct the typos and they have nothing to do with the website policies, programming or development projects.

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post #21 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

 

Are you really that dense? Why don't you write to Kasper? No one here on the forum, aside from a few volunteer Admins, has any ability to correct the typos and they have nothing to do with the website policies, programming or development projects.

 

And why do you respond then? I replied to the article asking about proofreading. If you are not one that can help, why are you so dense as to reply to something you have no control over? 

post #22 of 33
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

I'm a little surprised to see DED advertising a Google program, but it looks like it can certainly help out some of the developers who read AI.

Considering there's only 3 paragraphs (aka, run-on sentences) actually talking about Google Web Designer, I'd hardly call it an advertisement. The rest is the typical Dilger, "Why Google sux and Apple rox" BS.

It's funny hearing NFC described as a failure when Disney is making a huge push with it at their parks. Everything is using NFC (park admission, payments, room keys, even the refillable cups). Not bad for a "failed" tech.
post #23 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Considering there's only 3 paragraphs (aka, run-on sentences) actually talking about Google Web Designer, I'd hardly call it an advertisement. The rest is the typical Dilger, "Why Google sux and Apple rox" BS.

It's funny hearing NFC described as a failure when Disney is making a huge push with it at their parks. Everything is using NFC (park admission, payments, room keys, even the refillable cups). Not bad for a "failed" tech.

You use NFC on your phone to refill a cup at a Disney property?
post #24 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by akqies View Post



You use NFC on your phone to refill a cup at a Disney property?

 



The chip is in the cup. So the soda machine will only activate when a cup with an active chip is near it.
post #25 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliminius View Post

The chip is in the cup. So the soda machine will only activate when a cup with an active chip is near it.

If you are then well aware that the technology is not used in the capacity as it has been in a phone, where it has failed to gain real traction due to poor planning and implementation (among other reasons) why make a blanket statement implying the technology is great everywhere simply because it's effective somewhere?

Besides the very limited number of fountain machines Disney has to support with technology it's not querying a transaction server to remove funds the same it would have to be designed to support nearly every vendor if this were to be successful for payments. Your example is simply too limited to be proof that Android's NFC is somehow a success by this weak comparison.

BTW, and perhaps I should have opened with this, are you sure there cups are using NFC and not an RFID tag? That latter is a lot cheaper and seems just as effective for this type of transaction.

Finally, the most successful example of which I'm aware is Japan's FeliCa. It's not quite modern NFC but it's more advanced than good ol' RFID. Many of its aspects were used for creating the modern NFC standard.
post #26 of 33

The app is not native, it does not follow Apple HIG, looks like crap, and worst of all, it stealth installs Chrome. It doesn't give you the choice, it just installs the pile of crap.

post #27 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spiffers View Post
 

The app is not native, it does not follow Apple HIG, looks like crap, and worst of all, it stealth installs Chrome. It doesn't give you the choice, it just installs the pile of crap.

 

You must not be a web developer because if you were you would obviously have Chrome already installed as it is the most widely used browser which a developer would normally be interested in testing their code with.

 

Not sure what you mean by not native. Can you explain?

 

Agree about the Apple HIG. The appearance is not Apple inspired clearly. Looks more like Adobe Photoshop CC.

 

The functionality of the application is better than I've seen from any other HTML5 CSS3 authoring environment in terms of drag and drop, preview/code mode, with excellent prebuilt components, etc. I've tried others including iAd but this one seems the most intuitive and user friendly from my perspective.

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post #28 of 33

Well, Im actually a developer, but I do inspect the stuff I install, so thats why I discovered the drive-by-install of Chrome. Would not any real developer be critical to what she installs on her workstation? Any app that sneaks in other apps without asking is breaching the trust an user would have towards a developer, so no, I dont trust Google anymore.

When you can't clearly see the app is not native for Mac, you are not much of a developer yourself. No app developed with Xcode would have a menu bar within the window itself. The menubar is supposed to be on top of the screen, not somewhere else. Thats first. Second, the fonts used in the app, app-menus and so on are not as they are supposed to be. The HIG is made for a reason, this is just a quick and dirty ported linux app. It doesn't use Cocoa, but Chromium for the UI.

post #29 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spiffers View Post
 

When you can't clearly see the app is not native for Mac, you are not much of a developer yourself. No app developed with Xcode would have a menu bar within the window itself. 

Thanks for the explanation as to how you define native applications. I never considered Xcode as being a requirement. I could write an application in any language I like and compile it on a Mac using GCC and then run it natively. It doesn't even need an interface at all and could even be run from the command line just like so many native Apple ported applications from BSD to OS X do.

 

From Wikipedia:

Quote:
 (Native applications) Machine code or machine language is a system of instructions and data executed directly by a computer's central processing unit.

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post #30 of 33

Does not matter how you write the app, but for it to be a proper native Mac app, it would conform to the HIG, and use cocoa. You could write it in binary on a paper napkin for what I care, just as the app gives the proper feel. If you want, we can start to discuss the smallest details of an app being native or not, if you use the Wikipedia definition of "machine code" or "machine language" as a requirement for an app to be native, almost none of the Mac apps are native, as they are compiled during runtime. Most apps are just pre-compiled.

But thats not the point here, there are two points: 1. They install crap whitout any warning. 2. They have not provided a proper Mac tool. It would never be accepted in the App Store.

EOD.

post #31 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spiffers View Post
 

...almost none of the Mac apps are native, as they are compiled during runtime. Most apps are just pre-compiled.

I'm pretty sure they are binary executables.

 

Which complier is performing this runtime compilation? 

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post #32 of 33

Read the Objective-C documentation, for example the Objective-C Runtime Programming Guid, and you will understand what I just said. 

 

Im done with this discussion, wont check in anymore, have fun.

post #33 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spiffers View Post
 

Read the Objective-C documentation, for example the Objective-C Runtime Programming Guid, and you will understand what I just said. 

 

Im done with this discussion, wont check in anymore, have fun.

 

Ok good info. I never used it. I also found this website that I think is pretty good as further reading.

http://cocoasamurai.blogspot.com/2010/01/understanding-objective-c-runtime.html

 

There are many Unix Executable Files in OS X however. On my Mac there are 4,726 of them.

 

I agree with you about the GWD app as being non-compliant with Apple HIG but that does not really concern me too much. I'm more interested in what it can do than what it looks like. Almost all of the code writing I do is php/js/css for web so having a quick method to generate some HTML5 code is a welcome feature for me.

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