or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple competitors' iPhone-sized efforts failing as mini Android devices see low demand
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple competitors' iPhone-sized efforts failing as mini Android devices see low demand

post #1 of 63
Thread Starter 
Apple's 4-inch iPhones are the hottest selling smartphones on the market, but competitors like HTC and Samsung are having trouble getting consumers to buy into their own similarly sized devices.


Samsung's Galaxy S4 mini and Apple's iPhone 5. image via YouTube user adriansen


Devices like the HTC One and Samsung's Galaxy S4 sport displays larger than those of their predecessors, a result of some consumers' preference for larger screens. However, HTC and Samsung have also released the One Mini and Galaxy S4 mini, smaller-screened "flagship" handsets with less powerful specs, meant to compete with Apple's iPhone for buyers that want smaller devices. Those "mini flagships," though, have seen low sales, according to DigiTimes.

Citing industry sources, DigiTimes claims that the S4 mini has seen lackluster sales. This is due in part to the middling specs of the smaller-screened device, which has to compete with an array of other mid-range offerings from Samsung. Consumers are not flocking to the HTC One mini either, and the manufacturer has reportedly been forced in some markets to cut nearly 20 percent off that device's sale price just two months after its introduction.

Aside from competition from larger-screened, equally-specced devices, another factor could be Apple's iPhone, which marries the high-end performance typically seen in larger devices with the smaller form factor many consumers prefer. Multiple studies have already shown that more Android users switch to the iPhone than vice versa, and the recent record-breaking sales of Apple's newest iPhones indicate that there is still an appetite for devices in its size range, despite the poor sales of competitors' entries. Still, Android manufacturers' smaller flagship phones have found no traction among consumers, even though they are typically priced well below the iPhone.

Apple's refusal so far to move beyond a four-inch screen is due in part to the company's insistence that iPhone users should be able to operate their devices with just one hand. The screen size of the iPhone 5, 5s, and 5c allows most users to hold the device in one hand and access each part of the screen with a thumb.

Apple is still rumored to be working on an iPhone with a larger screen, though such rumors have persisted for some time. CEO Tim Cook has hinted that iPhones could get bigger displays when Apple can produce them without making trade-offs in terms of battery life, color reproduction, and other factors.
post #2 of 63

The Android manufacturers selling crappy small-screen handsets reminds me of the attitude the US automakers had towards small cars in the 1970s: smaller cars = crap. Large cars = luxury.

It never occurred to them that buyers actually wanted good small cars, even paying a premium for them.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #3 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Citing industry sources, DigiTimes claims that the S4 mini has seen lackluster sales. This is due in part to the middling specs of the smaller-screened device, which has to compete with an array of other mid-range offerings from Samsung. 

 

No... wrong.   Android phones are crap in general.  So people just decide they might as well get a bigger version of it.  That's all.  Jeez, I hate when people try to over-analyze a problem to make it sound more complicated than it really is.

This does not bode well for the Samsungs of the world.  If it is indeed true that no one is buying their smaller-screen version of the crap they sell, that means should Apple go bigger on the screen, most of those folks that suffered on Android long enough will abandon it like a sinking ship.

post #4 of 63

Does anyone else think this obsession with selling THE MOST phones is bit silly. If a company can make devices, sell them, and stay afloat, isn't that enough?
Blackberry was still selling millions of phones and they got hammered so hard. It seems like, as a society, we can't keep up this outlook on the economy, it isn't sustainable. We can't expect growth to last forever, won't we need to balance out eventually?

post #5 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post
 

Does anyone else think this obsession with selling THE MOST phones is bit silly. If a company can make devices, sell them, and stay afloat, isn't that enough?
Blackberry was still selling millions of phones and they got hammered so hard. It seems like, as a society, we can't keep up this outlook on the economy, it isn't sustainable. We can't expect growth to last forever, won't we need to balance out eventually?

 

You won't find many members here who think that selling the most phones is the correct way to determine any form of success.

post #6 of 63

I'm started to suspect AppleInsider is deliberately seeding their forums with an inordinate number of screen-size articles. It's like they're feeding us junk articles full of troll bait.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #7 of 63

People buy the iPhone for iOS and the iPhone build quality.

 

We are limited to a 4" screen because that is the only thing that Apple offers.

 

To make this comparison to Android phones based on screen size is silly.  What it says is that, given the option, most people prefer a bigger screen.

 

What this tells us is that Apple is behind the curve.  There are a few supply-chain-based rumors on here already claiming a big-screen iPhone is in the works for next year.

 

Apple usually steps into a market late, after it assesses the lay of the land.  Then it comes in and hits a home run.  I wouldn't be surprised if we see a bigger-screen iPhone soon.

 

 

Personally, I like a smaller phone because of pocket-ability.  I'd go for a small Android phone, myself.

post #8 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

Does anyone else think this obsession with selling THE MOST phones is bit silly. If a company can make devices, sell them, and stay afloat, isn't that enough?

Blackberry was still selling millions of phones and they got hammered so hard. It seems like, as a society, we can't keep up this outlook on the economy, it isn't sustainable. We can't expect growth to last forever, won't we need to balance out eventually?
Selling a lot of devices is never bad thing. The economies of scale is perhaps the main advantage. Data gathered from all those millions of devices also help create better services such as maps which again creates distinct and differentiating advantages.
post #9 of 63
Originally Posted by frugality View Post

What this tells us is that Apple is behind the curve.

 

lol. Also to some of the other, but mostly this. Apple is the curve. Is am are was were be being been. The rest are tangent lines.

 

There are a few supply-chain-based rumors on here already claiming a big-screen iPhone is in the works for next year.

 

There’s also still a 2.5” iPhone in the works, because a 3.5” screen is too big.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #10 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple is still rumored to be working on an iPhone with a larger screen.
The iPhone 5 has pretty much the perfect sized screen IMO. People here have pointed out the popularity of larger screen sizes, however - particularly in countries where the mobile device is likely to be the only 'computer' a person owns. When Apple brings out a larger screened iPhone will all those people still choose Samsung et al? I bet they are very very worried.
post #11 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by frugality View Post

To make this comparison to Android phones based on screen size is silly.  What it says is that, given the option, most people prefer a bigger screen.

What this tells us is that Apple is behind the curve.  There are a few supply-chain-based rumors on here already claiming a big-screen iPhone is in the works for next year.

No, what this says is there are two kind of 'droid customers: those who want cheap stuff, and those who for some reason need/want a big screen.
Nobody wants a premium 'droid phone, which is why the HTC One sell poorly, despite excellent hardware.
By and large people who can afford it want an iPhone. If they can't afford it they go for a cheap Android phone, and if they need a big screen, they buy the big-screened top-end Android phones for lack of a better alternative.

Should Apple offer a big-screen iPhone, the market for premium Android handsets will pretty much dry up, regardless of screen size.

Except for niches (visually impaired, fine motor skill impaired, need for teleconferencing or video surveillance, working with gloves on, etc.) the big screen phones are nonsense; even the 5 is borderline too big, up to the 4s they fit comfortably into the pocket, even with a sturdy case; make them bigger, and you restrict yourself to coat pockets unless you're size XXXL and the manufacturer didn't skimp and made pockets the same size as in size S...
post #12 of 63

People don't buy Android phones because of Android, they buy them for two reasons; cheap and big, and that's all the OEMs have going for them. Sure you might have a few Fandroids (or as I like to call them, iHaters) - as does every other platform, but I'm guessing they are just a very loud and insignificant vocal minority.

 

Apple on the other hand has everything else going for them, which is why people are willing to pay good money for their products.

 

 

It's simple, there's only two smartphones on the market, the iPhone and the not-iPhone.

Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
Reply
Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
Reply
post #13 of 63

Android handset makers obviously see the need for the small screen size as they have added "tiny screen mode" to their giant phones. The iPhone works because it's hardware and software were created for each other. There's a different flavour of Droid for every day of the week and every handset.

 

Personally I would rather have a phone I can use with one hand and carry in my pocket, then trying to make a call with an iPad mini held to my head.

post #14 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post
 

I'm started to suspect AppleInsider is deliberately seeding their forums with an inordinate number of screen-size articles. It's like they're feeding us junk articles full of troll bait.

 

It's not AI who is doing this -- the rumors of a larger iPhone 6 (likely 4.7-4.8") are almost certainly true, as they've been reported by an abundance of sources that are usually reliable, including the Wall Street Journal (despite being owned by News Corp, they generally only report financial rumors from good sources).  AI is a site that reports Apple rumors, and generally does a good job of filtering out the patently absurd ones.

 

But, as to the specific feature AI has written about here, I think this is an interesting subject.  For years Apple was far ahead of its Android competitors in terms of the performance, build quality, and battery life its phones offered.  And that's still the case when you compare the iPhone 5/5S to any < 4.5" Android.  The Android OEM's know they'll never be able to spend the same amount on R&D per device that Apple can because with the exception of the Samsung Galaxy line, any individual device could be a bust.  So to compete they needed to increase the dimensions of the device so that they could stuff things like quad-core processors and better cameras in the phone while also increasing the capacity of the battery.  

 

The thing that's remarkable about, say, the newly released 5S vs. the Note 3, is that they have comparable performance and battery life despite the fact that the 5S has roughly half of the cubic dimensions of the Note.  When Apple decides to add a larger phone to their lineup, it'll probably allow them to vastly improve performance, battery life, and camera specs vs. the 5S.  It may be a repeat of the phenomenon with smaller phones where Apple is far ahead of its competitors in the < 4.5" field.

post #15 of 63
Quote:
Should Apple offer a big-screen iPhone, the market for premium Android handsets will pretty much dry up, regardless of screen size.

Another way of looking at this is that one of the reasons android phones are large is because it was a gap Apple left in the market which allowed android manufacturers to differentiate (well, that and allow for a bigger battery).
Apple didn't leave a gap in the iPod market, and thus nobody else got any traction. I wouldn't want a larger phone than a 5, as I have an iPad. But I can see that some people do want a larger phone, and this information would tell you that a larger iPhone as a third product line (after 5s and 5c, maybe a 5max) would help to fill in a niche and give Android manufacturers a world of hurt.

Google of course, would be fine from IOS search and ad revenue anyway.
It's the heat death of the universe, my friends.
Reply
It's the heat death of the universe, my friends.
Reply
post #16 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Entropys View Post

Another way of looking at this is that one of the reasons android phones are large is because it was a gap Apple left in the market which allowed android manufacturers to differentiate (well, that and allow for a bigger battery).
Apple didn't leave a gap in the iPod market, and thus nobody else got any traction. I wouldn't want a larger phone than a 5, as I have an iPad. But I can see that some people do want a larger phone, and this information would tell you that a larger iPhone as a third product line (after 5s and 5c, maybe a 5max) would help to fill in a niche and give Android manufacturers a world of hurt.

Google of course, would be fine from IOS search and ad revenue anyway.
For Apple's sake, they'd best add a larger category and continue producing the 4-inch iPhone, rather than replace it.
post #17 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by reydn View Post


For Apple's sake, they'd best add a larger category and continue producing the 4-inch iPhone, rather than replace it.

 

I'm quite sure they wouldn't outright replace the 4-inch phone and risk alienating much of their base.  It might just get a spec bump in the same body, though, rather than the redesign that is typical every 2 years.

 

The real question in my mind is what Apple is planning on doing with the home button in a 4.7-4.8" phone?  If the iPhone 5/5S were simply blown up to be that screen size with the home button and top bezel intact, the device would be enormous (much bigger than the Galaxy S4).  But if they dump the home button, what are they going to do with the fingerprint sensor?  Put it on the back?  Embed it invisibly into the touchscreen?

post #18 of 63
If phones like the GS3 and GS4 Mini were actually just smaller versions of the real GS3/GS4 then I think they would have sold. The problem (as mentioned) is the Mini's were junk phones. They had crappy screens, slower processors, poor cameras - everything about them was cheap.

Samsung was trying to capitalize on the success and brand recognition of the GS3/GS4 by implying the Mini was "just as good but smaller" when they clearly weren't.

Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

Reply

Author of The Fuel Injection Bible

Reply
post #19 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post
 

The Android manufacturers selling crappy small-screen handsets reminds me of the attitude the US automakers had towards small cars in the 1970s: smaller cars = crap. Large cars = luxury.

It never occurred to them that buyers actually wanted good small cars, even paying a premium for them.

Yep, remember the BMW 318....that was like the yuppie car of the 80's. That's when Cadillacs and Town Cars were all over the place!

post #20 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by frugality View Post

People buy the iPhone for iOS and the iPhone build quality.

We are limited to a 4" screen because that is the only thing that Apple offers.

To make this comparison to Android phones based on screen size is silly.  What it says is that, given the option, most people prefer a bigger screen.

What this tells us is that Apple is behind the curve.  There are a few supply-chain-based rumors on here already claiming a big-screen iPhone is in the works for next year.

Apple usually steps into a market late, after it assesses the lay of the land.  Then it comes in and hits a home run.  I wouldn't be surprised if we see a bigger-screen iPhone soon.


Personally, I like a smaller phone because of pocket-ability.  I'd go for a small Android phone, myself.

Do they prefer larger or just cheaper?
post #21 of 63

Only one observation. Fix the damn header link to the article. It spawns a 404 Error from the top of the fold.

post #22 of 63

I think that practically anybody could design and make a "flagship" Android phone. 

 

Step one is simply deciding upon what kind of specs it will have. Just grab whatever CPU is currently popular for Android phones and use that. Overclock it a little bit. Don't worry if the phone gets somewhat hot. Fandroids can always wear gloves if needed. It's all about having large numbers on your spec sheet, because that's what counts, and anything else is secondary. Give the phone a bit more RAM than what is currently common, since Fandroids will love that, even though they're apparently unable to notice how laggy Android is, even with the most powerful CPU, and no matter how much RAM their phone has. All of the specs in the world won't help the phone perform good, because it's bogged down by a horrible mess of an OS, but the specs will at least be ammunition for the Fandroid phone owner when they are on forums, trying to defend their platform while they are busily deflecting away from other issues. 

 

Give it a fairly large screen, at least 7", the bigger, the better. Always remember who your customer base is. These are obviously people that are trying to compensate for something, because when your phone is almost as big as your head, something is clearly wrong.

 

Sit down, relax and draw a phone design that is competitive with other Android phones. That should take about 15-20 minutes, including a bathroom break. Use cheap feeling plastic, as we should stick with what Fandroids are used to, and we don't want to push them out of their comfort zone too much.

 

Get some Asian contractor to throw all of the parts together, and to actually assemble the phone for you. Don't worry about how all of the different components will work together, or if it will have any effect on battery life. If there's any issue with the phone after it's released, just promise that you'll eventually fix it in some future OS update. Fandroids will easily fall for that one. And if you want your phone to stand out even further from other Android phones, then just try to add one more feature on your phone that other Android phones do not have yet. For inspiration, just mimic whatever Apple did last, but hasn't yet made its way to all Android phones yet. Something like a fingerprint ID sensor might be a good idea for your phone. Use a cheap sensor, as it doesn't matter if it works good or not. The main thing that matters is that it's on your phone.

 

The last step is marketing your newly completed, wonderful Android phone. Don't make any commercials that tout any of the features on your phone, that is taboo. Stick with making fun of other people and brands, Apple is always a good and popular target. A commercial featuring a flock of sheep might be a good idea. Just make sure that your phone is cheap enough to attract the crowd that you are targeting, and you're pretty much set. Lastly, hire a whole bunch of shills to promote your product on various internet forums. Pay them by the post. You too can become a successful Android phone maker if you follow the simple steps outlined in this post.

post #23 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post
 

Does anyone else think this obsession with selling THE MOST phones is bit silly. If a company can make devices, sell them, and stay afloat, isn't that enough?
Blackberry was still selling millions of phones and they got hammered so hard. It seems like, as a society, we can't keep up this outlook on the economy, it isn't sustainable. We can't expect growth to last forever, won't we need to balance out eventually?


That's strictly Wall Street's view of how companies should go about selling products.  All Wall Street talks about is growth.  Big growth numbers.  They claim that once a company stops growing it not worth anything which is about as stupid a way to value a company as anyone can imagine.  I'm sure any company will run rather quickly into growth problems due to the finite number of humans on the planet.  It would be far better for any company to hold sustained market share for ten years than to have explosive growth over two years.  Wall Street is run by a bunch of greedy retards who care very little about the stability of a company the stock market or the economy.  These people seem to enjoy market imbalance so that it moves stocks up and down like a roller coaster instead of merely staying relatively level.  Samsung shot its entire load last year as far as growth is concerned and now it can only go down because that level of growth absolutely can't be sustained.

 

You mention BlackBerry, but there was also Nokia and Palm who had explosive growth but both over-reached and couldn't maintain.  In most cases huge amounts of market share taxes a company's finances in the long run because they usually have to have low-cost products to grab a lot of market share and it doesn't pay off if the high-end product isn't selling well.  That was Nokia's problem.  So, whenever the analysts keep calling for Apple to sell low-cost products to gain market share they're just plain stupid.  Apple will easily survive without anywhere's near major market share.  Apple won't die if another company has a hit product for six months and sells more units.  A company's focus should be on long-term survival and not from quarter to quarter.

 

Staying afloat or a little above that is a fine business model for a company, but not for Wall Street.  They're always looking for companies to double down and go all out in spurts but that's just being greedy.  As far as I'm concerned, consumers come first.  If you offer a good product and services, consumers will eventually come.  Maybe not everyone but many will.  Google's idea to capture every human on the planet with Android devices is just plain foolish and greedy.  I think their goal is too ambitious.  The Android platform is really getting out of hand due to all those devices being at so many hardware levels and that's why its so hard for Google to upgrade hundreds of millions of devices within a short a time period like Apple does with the iPhone.

 

This whole idea of companies having to have major market share doesn't make any sort of sense.  Companies need to keep their books balanced, first and foremost.  Over-reaching is very risky but apparently the big investors like companies to take big risks to make big gains.  Now BlackBerry has to lay off 40% of its workforce and I know Nokia also had to lay off a huge amount of employees when their once huge market share company went bust.  Naturally the big investors on Wall Street don't give a damn, but it's really bad business to run the stock market the way it is being run.  Companies should never have astronomical P/E ratios because actual money really doesn't exist.  It's more like a false sense of growth or maybe it should be called empty growth.  As you say, such high market share greed isn't sustainable and that's why our economy is so messed up.

post #24 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by reydn View Post


For Apple's sake, they'd best add a larger category and continue producing the 4-inch iPhone, rather than replace it.


Steve Jobs is dead and I know that but he always wanted to keep the product line simple or with as few products as possible.  Definitely the 4" iPhone should stay.  Adding another iPhone line might be somewhat complicated.  Apple might have to realign all their iPhone prices and it adds more consumer confusion as to which model to buy.  If a larger iPhone is added at this point then there would be three distinct types of iPhones if you figure in the polycarb iPhone.  I'm not sure if Apple should do that.  I think two iPhone models should be enough.  I'm really not all that keen on Apple having a monster display smartphone.  The largest size I think Apple should go is 4.2" or 4.3" but nowhere's near 4.8" or 5".  Apple isn't Samsung and I don't think Apple should listen to Wall Street telling them how to design their products.  I don't think a larger display is worth it just to grab 10% more market share.

post #25 of 63
Well, the trolls are right - no one wants a smaller screen phone! Everybody opts for the bigger screens.

This is absolutely proof.

Or, the non-sales could be because of this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


smaller-screened "flagship" handsets with less powerful specs

You know what spec-whores some of the trolls are.
post #26 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

Yep, remember the BMW 318....that was like the yuppie car of the 80's. That's when Cadillacs and Town Cars were all over the place!

It's weird their flagship phones are all jumbo sized. Their smaller models are mid-tiered, or cheap junk. It's like they're trying to associate size with premium-ness. Like America's Big Three once did.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #27 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

 

lol. Also to some of the other, but mostly this. Apple is the curve. Is am are was were be being been. The rest are tangent lines.

 

There’s also still a 2.5” iPhone in the works, because a 3.5” screen is too big.

Why is a 3.5" to big? Because you and I believe our iPhones are perfect for us? Why is it so hard to let the market decide?

Personally I am totally convinced that Apple would strengthen its position in the market strongly by offering a choice.

post #28 of 63
The best anything in the world is not the most common. Think of cars. Best as in high performance, sophistication, functionality, beauty, and luxury. It also comes with higher cost, but quality ir remembered long after price is forgotten. Argg, crash, I fell off my high horse.
post #29 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

I think that practically anybody could design and make a "flagship" Android phone. 

Step one is simply deciding upon what kind of specs it will have. Just grab whatever CPU is currently popular for Android phones and use that. Overclock it a little bit. Don't worry if the phone gets somewhat hot. Fandroids can always wear gloves if needed. It's all about having large numbers on your spec sheet, because that's what counts, and anything else is secondary. Give the phone a bit more RAM than what is currently common, since Fandroids will love that, even though they're apparently unable to notice how laggy Android is, even with the most powerful CPU, and no matter how much RAM their phone has. All of the specs in the world won't help the phone perform good, because it's bogged down by a horrible mess of an OS, but the specs will at least be ammunition for the Fandroid phone owner when they are on forums, trying to defend their platform while they are busily deflecting away from other issues. 

Give it a fairly large screen, at least 7", the bigger, the better. Always remember who your customer base is. These are obviously people that are trying to compensate for something, because when your phone is almost as big as your head, something is clearly wrong.

Sit down, relax and draw a phone design that is competitive with other Android phones. That should take about 15-20 minutes, including a bathroom break. Use cheap feeling plastic, as we should stick with what Fandroids are used to, and we don't want to push them out of their comfort zone too much.

Get some Asian contractor to throw all of the parts together, and to actually assemble the phone for you. Don't worry about how all of the different components will work together, or if it will have any effect on battery life. If there's any issue with the phone after it's released, just promise that you'll eventually fix it in some future OS update. Fandroids will easily fall for that one. And if you want your phone to stand out even further from other Android phones, then just try to add one more feature on your phone that other Android phones do not have yet. For inspiration, just mimic whatever Apple did last, but hasn't yet made its way to all Android phones yet. Something like a fingerprint ID sensor might be a good idea for your phone. Use a cheap sensor, as it doesn't matter if it works good or not. The main thing that matters is that it's on your phone.

The last step is marketing your newly completed, wonderful Android phone. Don't make any commercials that tout any of the features on your phone, that is taboo. Stick with making fun of other people and brands, Apple is always a good and popular target. A commercial featuring a flock of sheep might be a good idea. Just make sure that your phone is cheap enough to attract the crowd that you are targeting, and you're pretty much set. Lastly, hire a whole bunch of shills to promote your product on various internet forums. Pay them by the post. You too can become a successful Android phone maker if you follow the simple steps outlined in this post.

I agree with your comment. Because Android is free, I think this is how a lot of manufacturers (Blu, Micromax) comes to mind, manufactures their phones.
post #30 of 63
Quote:
For inspiration, just mimic whatever Apple did last, but hasn't yet made its way to all Android phones yet. Something like a fingerprint ID sensor might be a good idea for your phone. Use a cheap sensor, as it doesn't matter if it works good or not. The main thing that matters is that it's on your phone.

I suspect you will be spot on there. The reviews will all say: like the iphone sensor.
It's the heat death of the universe, my friends.
Reply
It's the heat death of the universe, my friends.
Reply
post #31 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by frugality View Post

What this tells us is that Apple is behind the curve.  There are a few supply-chain-based rumors on here already claiming a big-screen iPhone is in the works for next year.

Apple usually steps into a market late, after it assesses the lay of the land.  Then it comes in and hits a home run.  I wouldn't be surprised if we see a bigger-screen iPhone soon.

I'm with you thinking the 6 will be bigger, but disagree that this article/research suggests Apple is behind the curve? Why did Samsung and HTC feel the need to reduce the specs in the mini versions of their flagship? Fear of canabalizing themselves. Something Apple is not afraid of.
Quote:
Originally Posted by reydn View Post

For Apple's sake, they'd best add a larger category and continue producing the 4-inch iPhone, rather than replace it.

Next year I think the 5c becomes free on contract, 5s becomes 5sc with polycarbonate back at $99/$199, and the 6 is the new flagship.

Remember, the polycarbonate backs are easier to manufacture, and ship, which is what is causing the confusion regarding demand for it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

If phones like the GS3 and GS4 Mini were actually just smaller versions of the real GS3/GS4 then I think they would have sold. The problem (as mentioned) is the Mini's were junk phones. They had crappy screens, slower processors, poor cameras - everything about them was cheap.

Samsung was trying to capitalize on the success and brand recognition of the GS3/GS4 by implying the Mini was "just as good but smaller" when they clearly weren't.

This.
post #32 of 63

The home button in the picture of the iPhone 5 has caught the light very oddly, it makes it look like brushed metal.

censored

Reply

censored

Reply
post #33 of 63

So, what you're saying is, these Android vendors can't figure out why the size of your cock at an orgy only counts when it's hard. 

 

Who wants a flaccid Android phone that they can't brag about? The high-end Android phones only sell based on specs (bragging rights) and screen sizes.

 

Meanwhile, the flagship iPhone is what it is. It's a premium, rock-hard dong that's a great performer for its size. You know... it isn't the size of your boat that matters most, it's the motions in the oceans your boat is capable of. 

post #34 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post
 

The home button in the picture of the iPhone 5 has caught the light very oddly, it makes it look like brushed metal.

It's most likely a button cover. 

post #35 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

If phones like the GS3 and GS4 Mini were actually just smaller versions of the real GS3/GS4 then I think they would have sold. The problem (as mentioned) is the Mini's were junk phones. They had crappy screens, slower processors, poor cameras - everything about them was cheap.

Samsung was trying to capitalize on the success and brand recognition of the GS3/GS4 by implying the Mini was "just as good but smaller" when they clearly weren't.

The reason Android phones went large in the first place was so a larger battery could be used to get around the problem of poor battery life. Battery life still seems to be an issue because they aren't able to produce a 'mini' version without slowing down the processor and removing memory etc.

post #36 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedGeminiPA View Post
 

It's most likely a button cover. 

Is that a thing?  People cover their buttons?

censored

Reply

censored

Reply
post #37 of 63

Apple has said that it does not want to "compromise" by making a big screen phone.  But does anybody know what it means?

 

I speculate bigger screen means big battery drain, and requires twice the size of battery.

 

And I agree, once Apple solves the problem, it is over for big-screen Android phones.

post #38 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

If phones like the GS3 and GS4 Mini were actually just smaller versions of the real GS3/GS4 then I think they would have sold. The problem (as mentioned) is the Mini's were junk phones. They had crappy screens, slower processors, poor cameras - everything about them was cheap.

Samsung was trying to capitalize on the success and brand recognition of the GS3/GS4 by implying the Mini was "just as good but smaller" when they clearly weren't.

And yet we have people complaining about the 5C being last years phone as if no other manufacturer does this. And still the 5C would probably wipe the floor with most of these cheaper/smaller Android phones.
post #39 of 63
Android is for filling in the gap which Apple gives .
post #40 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by frugality View Post

People buy the iPhone for iOS and the iPhone build quality.

We are limited to a 4" screen because that is the only thing that Apple offers.

To make this comparison to Android phones based on screen size is silly.  What it says is that, given the option, most people prefer a bigger screen.

What this tells us is that Apple is behind the curve.  There are a few supply-chain-based rumors on here already claiming a big-screen iPhone is in the works for next year.

Apple usually steps into a market late, after it assesses the lay of the land.  Then it comes in and hits a home run.  I wouldn't be surprised if we see a bigger-screen iPhone soon.


Personally, I like a smaller phone because of pocket-ability.  I'd go for a small Android phone, myself.

I don't think it's quite that simple.

The large screen Android phones have sold reasonably well because that's the only thing that Android makers have to talk about. So they have differentiated their product based on size - and are capturing people who need a reason not to buy iPhones -- or who would never have bought an iPhone, anyway. It's not at all clear that a larger iPhone would sell a lot more (or any more) than the current sizes.

Apple started with only a single phone. When you're a small player breaking into a new market, having a proliferation of products can create problems for you and your customers. It's far easier to focus on a single product and doing it extremely well.

Then, as your business grows, it becomes large enough to support multiple products. The iPad was joined by the iPad Mini. The iPhone line was converted to a 'good, better, best' marketing strategy where last year's phones move down in the hierarchy - and even that was replaced with a strategy where both 'better' and 'best' were new phones.

Eventually, the business gets large enough that even a niche within the market becomes large enough to support a product. I suspect that we're close to that point now. Even if a 4.5-5" iPhone is a small percentage of iPhone sales, it would probably be large enough to support having one. Therefore, I expect to see a larger iPhone as an option in the next year or two, but I don't expect it to replace the current 4" phone (which could conceivably grow to perhaps 4.2" without changing the exterior dimensions).
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
  • Apple competitors' iPhone-sized efforts failing as mini Android devices see low demand
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Apple competitors' iPhone-sized efforts failing as mini Android devices see low demand