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iOS 7 feature focus: Redesigned Camera app gains burst mode, filters

post #1 of 36
Thread Starter 

iPhone owners have always been among the most snap-happy on the planet — Apple's devices are far and away the most popular on Yahoo's Flickr photo hosting service, for instance — and iOS 7 brings a wealth of new features and enhancements for shutterbugs.
 

iOS 7 updated camera app look

iOS 7's camera application gains a new, flat UI


Camera.app gets a facelift

The iOS camera app has seen a few aesthetic tweaks since the introduction of the original iPhone in 2007, but iOS 7 brings an entirely new look and new methods of interaction using touch. Gradients and three-dimensional buttons are replaced by flat black and simple shapes, and the stalwart shutter closing animation that signaled a photo being taken is eschewed in favor of a simple flash of light.

The options menu has been removed and the HDR and panorama selectors placed in the top-level UI. The HDR button joins the flash toggle and front-to-rear camera swap button in a black bar along the top of the preview pane, rather than in translucent buttons atop the image. Users can now enable or disable the grid overlay from the system settings app.

The camera application adds an additional "square" shooting mode — which natively captures a square format image, rather than cropping a larger one — to the holdover video, panoramic, and normal photo options. Mode selection has been moved to a three-dimensional "ring" just below the preview pane, and users can switch modes by swiping in either direction. Interestingly, the mode selector does not rotate when the phone shifts from portrait to landscape orientation, so users will need to use a vertical, rather than horizontal, gesture in that situation.
 

iOS 7 camera filters

iOS 7's realtime image filters are available on iPhone 5 or newer. Older models can apply filters during post-processing.


Instagram that filter

The new square aspect ratio shooting mode is tailor-made for social media sharing and is a particularly good fit for Instagram. National Geographic photographer Jim Richardson called out this feature specifically when using the iPhone 5s as his primary camera during a recent trek through Scotland.

With the addition of image filters, Apple has integrated a tentpole feature of many third-party sharing or camera applications directly into the operating system, making for easier snapping and sharing of photos across services. Apple provides eight filters by default, and it is not possible for users to define their own.

The preview pane can overlay the filters onto the live image for iPhone 5, 5c, or 5s owners. Filters can be chosen on a per-mode basis and will "stick" with that mode after the user leaves the camera application.

Users who prefer to post-process images, or who want to apply filters to panoramas, can do so through iOS 7's photos application. Filters cannot be applied to videos.
 

Burst mode and slo-mo

iPhone 5s with iOS 7's slow-motion editing handles, top, and burst mode image counter, bottom.


Burst into slow motion

For iPhone 5s owners, iOS 7 leverages the handset's beefy 64-bit A7 processor and upgraded camera module to provide some additional imaging options that require the increased horsepower — burst mode for still photos and slow motion for videos.

Burst mode works much the same as it does on a traditional point-and-shoot or DSLR camera, where holding down the shutter button will take a rapid-fire series of shots. Apple's burst mode captures 10 photos per second, and iOS 7 will intelligently decide which photos or series of photos are best and allow the user to choose between them. A small counter appears above the shutter button while depressed to show the number of burst shots taken.

Slow-motion video is enabled by the iPhone 5s camera's ability to capture video in high-definition 720p at 120 frames per second. After recording a video, users can choose which portions of the video to slow down using the same touch selection handles Apple introduced with the iOS version of iMovie.

Another welcome addition for the iPhone 5s is the ability to zoom video while recording using a pinch gesture. Users are no longer required to set the zoom before pressing the record button.
 


iPhone 5s slow-motion video sample
post #2 of 36

An already great, much-loved camera just got better. 

 

I'm curious about what the iPhone 6 will bring to the table in this regard. 

post #3 of 36
My wife hates iOS7, and one of the main reasons is burst mode. She grew accustomed (as did I) to composing shots while touching the shutter button and quickly snapping the photo upon release. Now the camera goes crazy taking pictures while she's composing. Going back to sort through and delete the undesirable pics is a chore she has thus far declined to do. A real mess awaits the next photo upload.
Why burst mode can't be disabled in preferences is beyond me.
post #4 of 36
Burst Mode also works on my 4S, though it may not produce quite as many photos per second.
post #5 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

I'm curious about what the iPhone 6 will bring to the table in this regard.

i'm more interested in the iPhone 11S'. i hear that's going to be a doozy, especially wrt the takeup reel and size of the teeth. *can't wait!*
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post #6 of 36
Originally Posted by Pooch View Post
i'm more interested in the iPhone 11S'.

 

For those keeping track, that’s the 19th iPhone.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #7 of 36
Unfortunately, the new camera app is the source of one of only two complaints I have about iOS 7 %u2014 but they're both major issues for me. In making 'burst' mode the default shutter release for still photos, Apple has inadvertently scrapped one of the camera app's most elegant features. For years prior to iOS 7, we had the very refined option of being able to place our finger on the shutter button and leave it there until the moment we wanted the precisely framed and awaited moment, at which time we could motionlessly remove our finger from the shutter button. Voila! No shake, no poking, no jostling %u2014 simply lift your finger! Brilliant!

Try doing that now. Your machine gun shutter will fire off a couple dozen rounds before you know what's happening, leaving you with 30 unwanted, blurred images. There is a time and place for burst mode, but a few of us are more invested in the refinement we have enjoyed since the days of the 3G until now %u2014 rather than casting our lot with the whim of lucky numbers.

We'd really like to have that option back on the phone.
post #8 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The camera application adds an additional "square" shooting mode — which natively captures a square format image, rather than cropping a larger one

That's not true as the CCD is rectangular. Sometimes your ded on, sometimes ded wrong.
post #9 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post

My wife hates iOS7, and one of the main reasons is burst mode. She grew accustomed (as did I) to composing shots while touching the shutter button and quickly snapping the photo upon release. Now the camera goes crazy taking pictures while she's composing. Going back to sort through and delete the undesirable pics is a chore she has thus far declined to do. A real mess awaits the next photo upload.
Why burst mode can't be disabled in preferences is beyond me.

Didn't see your comment until I had posted mine, Cpsro.  Thanks for expressing the same sentiments.  I hope Apple is listening!

post #10 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

That's not true as the CCD is rectangular. Sometimes your ded on, sometimes ded wrong.

We all make mistakes...

 

article By Shane Cole

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #11 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by larryhorton View Post
 
Didn't see your comment until I had posted mine, Cpsro.  Thanks for expressing the same sentiments.  I hope Apple is listening!

I haven't upgraded to iOS 7 on my iPhone 5 but that is really a bummer about the burst mode deal. Holding down the shutter release button while framing the shot is the way I always use the camera. I was so happy when I learned about that feature, reading about it here on AI from a poster, can't remember who, but it really does make a big difference in the quality of photos.

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post #12 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post
 

An already great, much-loved camera just got better. 

 

I'm curious about what the iPhone 6 will bring to the table in this regard. 

Just more improvements, faster processor, maybe more RAM, maybe IGZO screens, maybe a new case design, etc.

post #13 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpsro View Post

My wife hates iOS7, and one of the main reasons is burst mode. She grew accustomed (as did I) to composing shots while touching the shutter button and quickly snapping the photo upon release. Now the camera goes crazy taking pictures while she's composing. Going back to sort through and delete the undesirable pics is a chore she has thus far declined to do. A real mess awaits the next photo upload.
Why burst mode can't be disabled in preferences is beyond me.

 

Download a different camera app?

 

It's really not an iOS 7 problem. 

post #14 of 36
Yeah, not a problem with the built in Camera app, he's just holding it wrong.

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post #15 of 36
The filters are very poor. How about a filter that actually improves the photo?
post #16 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

The filters are very poor. How about a filter that actually improves the photo?

Again, anecdotal. Based on general consensus, there's nothing particularly wrong with the stock camera app. You're free to download other camera apps. Apple knows this and they don't seem to mind.

Keep in mind that the stock camera app is not VSCO Cam, for instance. It's pretty obvious that a lot of folks just naturally move on from the stock apps over the years. Been this way since the inception of the App Store. And this has worked pretty brilliantly for Apple, and certainly not to the detriment of the platform, which has the most robust developer community in the biz.
post #17 of 36
iPhone 4 and 4S owners also get marred composing experience with the normal photo mode. The preview is made to fill the screen rather than fit. The longer edges are missing part of the final image. Worse, the opaque shutter button and your finger obscure another part of the image and the tinted areas don't help with composing either.

I've been using the square mode to avoid these problems, but sometimes the camera defaults back to the full mode. Seems like the testing is happening more on the 4" screens.
post #18 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by larryhorton View Post

Unfortunately, the new camera app is the source of one of only two complaints I have about iOS 7 %u2014 but they're both major issues for me. In making 'burst' mode the default shutter release for still photos, Apple has inadvertently scrapped one of the camera app's most elegant features. For years prior to iOS 7, we had the very refined option of being able to place our finger on the shutter button and leave it there until the moment we wanted the precisely framed and awaited moment, at which time we could motionlessly remove our finger from the shutter button. Voila! No shake, no poking, no jostling %u2014 simply lift your finger! Brilliant!

Try doing that now. Your machine gun shutter will fire off a couple dozen rounds before you know what's happening, leaving you with 30 unwanted, blurred images. There is a time and place for burst mode, but a few of us are more invested in the refinement we have enjoyed since the days of the 3G until now %u2014 rather than casting our lot with the whim of lucky numbers.

We'd really like to have that option back on the phone.

Using the physical button on the side of the iPhone is far easier.
Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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post #19 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

For those keeping track, that’s the 19th iPhone.

And that's so 2025.
post #20 of 36
Only used the 5S camera for a couple of hours on the day of release. Loved iOS7 Camera app: super easy to learn and use with a superb panorama function! However, having had the burst mode go off a couple of times unintended, I started using the volume button to shoot. Simples!
post #21 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

That's not true as the CCD is rectangular. Sometimes your ded on, sometimes ded wrong.
We all make mistakes...

article By Shane Cole

Ha! Joke's on me, then. I really thought this was another article from Daniel. Secondly, why the hell don't these articles get a signature with date & time of publishing (Kaspers' slave isn't going to do it for accuracy, and please get rid of the word slave as it's still in effect) and the authors' name?
post #22 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

The filters are very poor. How about a filter that actually improves the photo?

For that you'll need to learn photography as a filter could not improve a photo.
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by orangermac View Post

iPhone 4 and 4S owners also get marred composing experience with the normal photo mode. The preview is made to fill the screen rather than fit. The longer edges are missing part of the final image. Worse, the opaque shutter button and your finger obscure another part of the image and the tinted areas don't help with composing either.

I've been using the square mode to avoid these problems, but sometimes the camera defaults back to the full mode. Seems like the testing is happening more on the 4" screens.

Excellent point! And this problem has always been the case, ever since the 1st gen in 2007. The CCD is 4:3, the screen was 3:2, now 16:9, nee, 71:40. After taking a picture you need to zoom out to see the whole frame. And that makes it very difficult to compose because there is no viewfinder (although these are usually not 100% either)
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

The filters are very poor. How about a filter that actually improves the photo?

For that you'll need to learn photography as a filter could not improve a photo.

I suppose that depends on what the meaning of improve is. There are many types of filters. For example Photoshop has several dozen filters that can create effects which might be suitable for a particular purpose. I have not used any iOS Camera filters but to dismiss all photographic filters as non productive, is painting with a very broad brush. I know a photographer who boasts about never retouching any photographs yet we have retouched many of them later for his clients. Sometimes just contrast or brightness, other times full on color correction.

 

Mostly off topic but he does have an interesting technique. He shoots exclusively autos. In a large studio all the lights are out in total darkness. The shutter of the camera is opened and then several remote flashes are triggered for a few milliseconds and the shutter is then closed. At that point they turn on all the studio lights and make some adjustments such as dusting the tire treads and chrome trim with baby powder turning on the parking lights, etc. Then they do another double exposure using the previous dark studio method. Ultimately they might do 3-5 exposures for the final photo. Obviously they are still shooting film (4x5) but that is another story altogether because there a very few film processing services left in business.

 

Bottom line is that, sure you can learn photography at a community college but some people take it to extremes. There are many cases in between.

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post #25 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I suppose that depends on what the meaning of improve is.

Very true. I just think a good photo is made by a strong composition and other factors, not 'aided' by other things, including altering a picture afterwards. Or bracketing, sounds like the photographer doesn't know what to do.
Quote:
There are many types of filters. For example Photoshop has several dozen filters that can create effects which might be suitable for a particular purpose.

Well, if the photo is for a marketing use these filters certainly have their purpose. Or something. I'd use filters for beautiful shot of a waterfall, for instance. They definitely have their purpose.
Quote:
I have not used any iOS Camera filters but to dismiss all photographic filters as non productive, is painting with a very broad brush.

Nice!
Quote:
Bottom line is that, sure you can learn photography at a community college but some people take it to extremes. There are many cases in between.

Good point! And I have to stress that there are way more things in photography that I don't know about compared to the things I have learned. I would like 'to learn it all' but only so much time in a day...
post #26 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

 

I'm curious about what the iPhone 6 will bring to the table in this regard. 

Pro Mode. If I have one, I'll be happy. Everything else are as fine as they are. Pro Mode so you can lock 3 things separately: AE Lock, AF Lock and WB Lock.

post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post
 

An already great, much-loved camera just got better. 

 

I'm curious about what the iPhone 6 will bring to the table in this regard. 

I am confused why the iPhone 5S was even named that.  The changes seemed significant enough to justify calling it the iPhone 6.  It was hardly just a speed bump from the previous model.  A 64-bit processor, redesigned home button and Touch ID.  Man, if these changes were not enough to name the model the iPhone 6, I guess next year's model must be mind-blowing.

post #28 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


Excellent point! And this problem has always been the case, ever since the 1st gen in 2007. The CCD is 4:3, the screen was 3:2, now 16:9, nee, 71:40. After taking a picture you need to zoom out to see the whole frame. And that makes it very difficult to compose because there is no viewfinder (although these are usually not 100% either)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


That's not true as the CCD is rectangular. Sometimes your ded on, sometimes ded wrong.

 

Also you were also 'ded' wrong because the image sensor is not CCD at all, it's CMOS.

 

-greg

post #29 of 36
I just wish it had a better zoom lens.
 
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post #30 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by pazuzu View Post

I just wish it had a better zoom lens.

Walk over.
post #31 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


For that you'll need to learn photography as a filter could not improve a photo.

I disagree. Colour grading can do millions to a photo. How do you think a feature film would look ungraded? Or a fashion magazine ungraded? Pretty bad, I'd guarantee you. The filters shouldn't be about making it look crazy this and crazy that, that could be up to other apps. Apple's filters or photo settings should be treating the RAW files before saving them to JPEG, like brighten shadows, secure skin tones, low contrast, save highlights, shot against the light, temperature etc.

 

I've spent over a decade following the development of the digital cameras.. and they all fail due to this new digital aesthetics: High contrasts, cutting brights and shades, oversaturation, corrupt colour reproduction, over the top sharpness. They should join forces with the team behind the Fujifilm X-E1 or something and make both a sensor that truly captures a high dynamic range, and better colour reproduction in all ISO's and all light conditions.

post #32 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by palegolas View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

For that you'll need to learn photography as a filter could not improve a photo.
I disagree.

And you disagree rightfully so. I actually meant the filters on the iPhone. Screw on filters for your (SLR) lens can indeed make a photo much better, and digital filters as well I guess, though I haven't used those.

By better I actually meant that a photo can be fantastic without a filter, or made with a 2Mpx camera...it's not the camera that makes it a great photo, that's the beauty of the photographer. But 'better' can of course also mean that the same person is likely to make a better photo with a SLR than with some low level dumb phone camera.

Personally I like to make a photo 'as good as I can' without any aided tech, like bracketing. So yeah, I wrote a stupid thing and didn't elaborate on it. Hope I'm making sense here ...
post #33 of 36
After ios7 upgrade my camera on the iPhone 5 has a black screen!!!
post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by zcamera View Post

After ios7 upgrade my camera on the iPhone 5 has a black screen!!!

Taking it out of your ass might help¿
post #35 of 36
On my iPhone 5 the HDR photo function does not SEEM to work. All the business about shooting three pictures (correct exp, over exp, under exp) and combining them just doesn't seem to happen. In previous IOS you could actually hear and see the three photos being taken. Now it seems to just take one picture and that's it.

Anyone else have this problem?
post #36 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by fbx3 View Post

On my iPhone 5 the HDR photo function does not SEEM to work. All the business about shooting three pictures (correct exp, over exp, under exp) and combining them just doesn't seem to happen. In previous IOS you could actually hear and see the three photos being taken. Now it seems to just take one picture and that's it.

Anyone else have this problem?

Well, it only saves 2 photos in the camera roll, not 3. The app sometimes reverts the HDR setting, so you might need to check it again when taking a photo after quitting the app. And in /Settings/Photos & Camera you need to set it to keep the originals.
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