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Apple's 2011 MacBook Pro lineup suffering from sporadic GPU failures - Page 2

post #41 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

Is it just me or does this not happen with nVidia? Yes, I'm going there.

Well... tell that to my dead 2008 15" MacBook Pro. The nVidia 8600M GT died and I didn't have enough money to repair it so... there went a perfectly capable computer down the toilet.

 

What a waste :-/

post #42 of 126

I had this issue and just had my logic board replaced on my 2011 MBP a couple of months ago (thankfully I still have AppleCare). And then, a week or so ago, the glitches started showing up again.

 

My MBP ran without issue without the glitches until early 2013. I don't know if it's a driver issue or what, but the GPU glitches didn't occur until after I installed Mountain Lion.

post #43 of 126

In my case, I was living in Brazil, and even if it was in guarantee (bought it in Europe, so 2 years) and in the extended replacement period (until late 2012), there's no fixing the problem for free in Brazil so... had to let the laptop go :-(

 

In your case... I'd say this new logic board could also be failing because of the extra strain ML does to the GPU. Who knows though.

post #44 of 126
Damn,
I have this model and probably will start to see this failure soon.
post #45 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Wait a minute. I thought the narrative was that Apple moved away from nvidia in their notebooks supposedly because of video chipset failure. Now AMDs are failing?

Maybe that's why they moved back to NVidia. 1wink.gif The 2012 Macs run much cooler with the new NVidia chips:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/6037/the-2012-macbook-pro-review/2

"We took a look at performance over time, and as expected, Ivy Bridge and Kepler do a really good job of minimizing heat buildup over time and the corresponding amount of throttling that occurs. Through 40 runs of our Half-Life 2 test (at native res with maxed out settings), I ended up with nearly identical numbers the entire way through, with a very slight downward trend emerging (the delta between the average of runs 2 through 10 was a bit under 1% better than the average of runs 32 through 40). It's pretty much a flat line all the way across, the new chips really let the MBP run at significantly lower temperatures. Using it versus a Core 2 or SNB MacBook Pro, it noticeably doesn't get anywhere near as hot to the touch in day to day use."

Still, integrated graphics are by far the most reliable. Mac Mini and Macbook Air failures aren't as common. If Apple moves the MBP line to Iris Pro, I imagine this sort of thing would become much less common. The chips in the likes of the Mac Pro get the benefit of much better cooling systems.
Quote:
Originally Posted by konqerror 
Told you guys. Lead free solder + thermal cycling = failure. It's not just ATI, nVidia or Microsoft, it's an industry-wide problem.

You mean an industry-wide solution to the problem of how computer manufacturers get people to keep buying new computers. It's bad for consumers that machines break but good business for the people who sell them. Customers lose trust if it happens within a short time but after 5-6 years, it forces people to upgrade.
Quote:
Originally Posted by edgardito 
Damn,
I have this model and probably will start to see this failure soon.

Don't wait for it to happen, sell it when the new ones are out and either get a 2012 refurb or a 2013 model. It doesn't cost all that much more money to upgrade regularly and you get the benefit of having a new machine.
post #46 of 126

Even though Mac failures are considerably less than those of PCs (which is obvious), it still bugs me to see people paying twice as much money to get some peace of mind, but end up with such things. This added to the fact that Mac repairs are becoming increasingly expensive, just makes me hope that Apple take quality very seriously.

post #47 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by akqies View Post


Did this still occur when you switched between to the iGPU over the dGPU?

I thought warranties for items were 2 full years in the UK for electronics.

 

Interesting point on warranties.

 

EU law dictates that all sellers have to provide 2 years.

 

There has been several block actions against apple on this in various eu countries and apple have been heavily fined many millions of euros.

 

UK sellers try to ignore this, but if push comes to shove that have to honour the EU law but it will take some fighting in most cases.

post #48 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

AppleCare for a MBP is $349, it still isn't a good deal. In fact it is a terrible deal considering it only provide 3 years of warranty protection.

Funny that. I had my dead keyboard backlight replaced a few months back and I got my logic board replaced for this exact problem just last week. Total cost? About $600. That's a bit more than $350. Seems like you don't really understand economics. AppleCare is a MUST on MacBooks because parts are very expensive for them.
post #49 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by HKZ View Post


Funny that. I had my dead keyboard backlight replaced a few months back and I got my logic board replaced for this exact problem just last week. Total cost? About $600. That's a bit more than $350. Seems like you don't really understand economics. AppleCare is a MUST on MacBooks because parts are very expensive for them.

 

Keep the receipts, if apple decide its a widespread problem and offer to fix all effected machines they will refund you.

post #50 of 126

What the article describes is _exactly_ what happened to my 17" 2011 early macbook pro one week ago. The glitches and then later blackout.

The macbook pro is about 2,5 years old and therefore not covered by the 2 year reclamation anymore you have in EU...I have an appointment in the local applestore this week to hear their take on it.

I am quite disappointed and worried wondering what will happen with the other laptops we have in the studio (late 2011 models).

 

I wish Apple would considergiving  the pro line 3 years applecare included as a proof-of-quility-and-care protecting you against bad runs of components.

 

cheers

post #51 of 126
It seems that every single Apple product must work and last forever.

And every bit of Apple news is, well, news and click bait.
post #52 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

Is it just me or does this not happen with nVidia? Yes, I'm going there.

 

It's just you. Google 'Nvidia failure." Go ahead, I'll grab a coffee. A big one.

post #53 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamC View Post

It seems that every single Apple product must work and last forever.

And every bit of Apple news is, well, news and click bait.

 

No, but it would be nice if they didn't fail in large batches due to component defects.

post #54 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by sorenbcn View Post

I wish Apple would considergiving  the pro line 3 years applecare included as a proof-of-quility-and-care protecting you against bad runs of components.

According to their 10K filing in 2012, they made $3.4b from software, services and other, which mostly likely includes AppleCare but also repair revenue. This is listed separate from iTunes but it does include 3rd party software sales and will include sales of OS X. They sold 18.1 million Macs that year so deducting sales of OS X Mountain Lion, which would be 28 million copies x $20 = $560m, that's $2.84b or $157 per Mac and there's still 3rd party software to deduct.

If they increased the price of every Mac by say $50, they might be able to offer 3 year warranties on everything. I'd actually rather that they did warranties per person than per product as well as additional coverage for accidental damage and this can be offered to a company based on the number of machines covered.

There could be family plans too and you just pick how many devices you need in the plan. An individual plan would cover 1 Mac, 1 iPhone and 1 iPad with additional charges per device and would cover any device, even used ones that were under 3 years old. You'd never have to deal with getting AppleCare boxes, it would be a subscription service and have an online portal where you could check coverage and register serial numbers. Serial numbers would have to be registered within the first year of ownership.

An individual plan could be $5/month + $5/month optional for accidental damage or charge for additional devices.
A family plan could cover 3 Macs, 3 iPhones/iPods and 3 iPads for $10/month.
Company plans would be based on the number of units.

They can use iTunes billing for it so no new IDs or logins required.
post #55 of 126

The exact same problem happened to my 2000+ EUR iMac 27" from 2011.

 

As a response Apple issued a replacement program for the AMD video cards.

I went to an Authorized Apple Service Provider and I got it changed for free.

 

However, my iMac only worked for a couple of weeks.

 

After sending the iMac again to the service with the exact same issues, I got a reply back from them saying that the logic board needs to be replaced, for 700+ EUR.

 

Frustrated, I emailed Tim Cook and Apple Support. The following day an Executive Relations EMEIA from Ireland called me saying that the problem needs to be discussed on the phone, not on email.

 

He investigated the issue and came back to me after a couple of days telling me that Apple won't replace the logic board for free, or even with a discount.

 

I hate this happening to a very expensive machine which was only used for 18 months, and I'm bugged by the great feedback you can read on the internet about the Apple Service.

Mine was horrific and I will not buy an iMac again, I think more of us should reconsider what we're spending our money on.

From what I can see here, I can deduct that most of their Mac line is compromised

 

I can prove what I wrote above with the emails exchanged between me and the Apple guy.

post #56 of 126

One of the most frustrating things about this issue has been Apple's refusal to acknowledge it as a widespread problem.  In conversations with Genius Bar staff, phone support, and representatives from Customer Relations and engineering, users have been repeatedly told that the graphics issues they are experiencing are uncommon.  The thousands of posts on the Apple Support Communities have been readily dismissed as unreliable.

 

Apple is in the best position to collect data about these issues, from the repairs they have made to affected units and the feedback form that users are encouraged (by Apple as well as forums) to use to report their experiences.  However, apparently whatever data they have collected has not swayed Apple's opinion that these issues are widespread or major enough to be covered under a replacement program like the one they recently announced for 2011 27" iMacs with similar 6000-series AMD Radeon GPUs

 

I am still working my way through scraping information (date, model, GPU, resolution) about affected computers from the 2500+ posts in the major threads on the Apple Support Communities, to get a broader sense of the timeline and trends since these threads began soon after the early 2011 models were released.  It's a pretty epic project (and the threads keep growing, so I'll never really be "done"), and I hope to share the stats from that soon.  I've also been running an informal survey about affected computers since late July 2013 (that Apple's moderators quickly tried to suppress on their forums) that has received over 200 responses so far.  While the data is skewed to reflect largely the most recently affected users, the quick and dirty analytics show some interesting things about the distribution of models, GPUs, and attempts at resolving the problem. 

 

My own early 2011 MacBook Pro is on its fourth logic board, and so far (about a month after the latest replacement), it is finally operating properly.  But I am deeply concerned with the issues experienced with these models, and very interested to find out what is causing them - since the first posts in March 2011, users have speculated on issues caused by the GPU chips, solder, firmware, drivers, fan control, etc.  While several users over the years have proclaimed to have "solved" the issue, so far I have yet to find a solution within the relevant threads that helped every user that tried it.  So I don't think we really know what's going on here, and perhaps we never will if Apple doesn't present a replacement program to resolve these issues once and for all. 

post #57 of 126

@saramwrap even if they acknowledge such problems and issue replacement programs for failing video cards, it might be that the underlying issue (which I guess is heat) might cause other components to fail

 

hence we receive instructions to change our logic boards on our own expenses.

 

It's incredibly frustrating but I think it's mostly our fault - the customers - allowing this to happen.

We keep praising Apple products and they get a lot of credit from the general public regarding their incredible customer service and experience. But we never seem to nail down the bad examples.

 

I think a lot of bad publicity should go around the outrageous warranties that Apple offers in Europe (against the EU regulations), but we as customers only seem to see this when our expensive machines fail.

 

I for myself am on the market to buy a well built PC, with a normal warranty (at least 2 years), and I will exclude any product from Apple's line from my shopping list.

post #58 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by saramwrap View Post

One of the most frustrating things about this issue has been Apple's refusal to acknowledge it as a widespread problem.

I am still working my way through scraping information (date, model, GPU, resolution) about affected computers from the 2500+ posts in the major threads on the Apple Support Communities, to get a broader sense of the timeline and trends since these threads began soon after the early 2011 models were released.

You have to remember that Apple sells 15-20 million Macs every year. One particular product line could have as many as 4 million units. If 2500 people have a fault, that's a 0.06% failure rate. It's impossible to determine the failure rates from forum comments, only Apple knows this data.
post #59 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post


You have to remember that Apple sells 15-20 million Macs every year. One particular product line could have as many as 4 million units. If 2500 people have a fault, that's a 0.06% failure rate. It's impossible to determine the failure rates from forum comments, only Apple knows this data.

 

I agree that it is impossible to determine the percentage of affected units, and whether or not those numbers are statistically significant to Apple. 

 

But many of the Apple responses have been along the lines of "we've never seen this problem before," which is nonsense even if less than 1% of machines are actually affected - their repairs, engineering tests, and feedback form responses must at least show that this is a repeatable issue across (even a relatively small) number of machines.  As an affected customer, I find it insulting to see responses from Apple that deny that other users are having the same issue.  They told numerous 2011 iMac users similar things until they reached some sort of tipping point where it was suddenly worth running a GPU replacement program for affected computers.   One day, Apple claims that your issue is unique and unusual and you have to pay to fix it... then suddenly, that same problem is acknowledged as endemic to the affected model(s) and fixed on Apple's dime.  It's like magic.

 

I'm also very curious about whether the 2011 MacBook Pro issues are related to the 2011 iMac issues that are being (somewhat) addressed by a replacement program - the affected computers all share GPUs from the AMD Radeon HD 6000M Series.  The early 2011 MacBook Pros use the 6490M and 6750M (with users reporting similar issues with both), the late 2011 MacBook Pros use the 6750M and 6770M (thus far, I've only seen reports about issues with the 6750M among these models, but data is sparse), and the mid-2011 iMacs use the 6750M, 6770M, and 6970M (with the 6970M recognized as faulty with an active replacement program).  If issues are shared among three prominent 2011 model lines, that suddenly could represent a much larger share of the 2011 units sold.  In 2012, both lines switched back to using NVIDIA, which had been heavily used in MacBook Pros before 2011 (most famously, in the 2007 and 2008 models that also ended up covered under a GPU replacement program).

post #60 of 126
As this is clearly a developing fault with the hardware that has nothing to do with the consumer, no one should be paying a cent, AppleCare Warranty or not. Apple should be covering this and seeking remedy from AMD.
post #61 of 126
This is happening to my 2011 MBP...I am scheduled to take it in this weekend. The screen randomly goes blank (black) with no way to recover. Have to hard power down sometimes several times before issue is resolved.
post #62 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by HKZ View Post

Funny that. I had my dead keyboard backlight replaced a few months back and I got my logic board replaced for this exact problem just last week. Total cost? About $600. That's a bit more than $350. Seems like you don't really understand economics. AppleCare is a MUST on MacBooks because parts are very expensive for them.

I agree. For me it was a new battery and logic board. My only regret is I can't buy another three years!
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #63 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

I completely forgot about the 8600M GT. I should have said, in the last five years has there been problems with nVidia but that statement could come back to bite me as well because we do not know how the 2012 rMBP will be a few years from now.

 

I had my logic board replaced under this;

 

http://support.apple.com/kb/TS4088

Just say no to MacMall.  They don't honor their promotions and won't respond to customer inquiries.  There are better retailers out there.
Reply
Just say no to MacMall.  They don't honor their promotions and won't respond to customer inquiries.  There are better retailers out there.
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post #64 of 126

Mine has been rock solid.  Watch it fail once my AppleCare expires in June 2014.  Maybe they'll have a recall by then or something.  

post #65 of 126

I had the same issue about 2 months ago.  Only remedy was to replace the logic board for $550 ($350 if you send it out for repair through an Apple Store -- which I couldn't because it takes 3-4 days and this is a work machine).

 

I brought in examples from message boards at the time to show this was a bigger issue, but the store said there is no formal warranty program in place for early-2011 15" Macbook Pros so I would have to pay.

 

Now I see this.

 

I get you never know the failure rate from message boards (where only the problem cases speak out), but clearly this is a bigger issue than normal wear and tear.

 

I had a problem with the battery and it was later found to be a firmware issue so they did refund my $180 battery replacement fee after the fact.  So Apple does make good on their mistakes.  Nobody (no company) is perfect and there is not an unlimited warranty on anything.  

 

But if this is a broader problem then Apple needs to make good for their loyal customers.

post #66 of 126

I had a GPU fail on a 2010 Pro (nvidia). The integrated worked fine, but whenever it would switch to the dedicated gpu, it would artifact and then crash the video card whenever i tried to play video and/or do anything in photoshop/lightroom.

 

It was (eventually) replaced by apple, and failed again about 8 months later. They replaced the entire computer with a 2011 AMD, and it lasted about 12-14 months before failing. Exactly the same every time. I get the feeling this is a "form over function issue" with the unibody enclosures not having enough cooling capacity.

 

Apple was throttling both GPUs and CPUs during the first couple years of the unibody to keep heat down (not sure about 2012 and 2013 models). I don't think they throttled them enough for the limited cooling they use with these computers! Otherwise maybe one of the numerous updates did something to whatever software/firmware was throttling them? The stages of the failure are very consistent with what happens if you put a high-end gaming GPU in a closed mid-tower and don't include any sort of cooling system.

 

It's one thing to try and point the finger at AMD or Nvidia, but I really think in this case, Apple has maybe put form a little bit ahead of function and these processors are just too "hot" for the unibody design. They've obviously had a hard time balancing the "specs" and putting top-of the line processors in their computers to satisfy the "specs" type consumers while also trying to make the computers as thin as possible. Maybe a less powerful/cooler running GPU would've been a better idea than throttling a hotter one?

 

I should note that about half the time, I use my computer with the lid closed and 2 external monitors + a keyboard, which doesn't help much with the heat issue. I'd love it if OSX would allow for having the computer "open", but without the built-in monitor running. Windows does this nicely in "projector mode", but OSX is sadly lacking this feature which means clamshell closed = lots of extra heat.

post #67 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Actually NVidia had a huge problems in MBPs a few years ago. I wouldn't be surprised to find that the move to AMD was the result of that issue. In NVidias case it was a solder joint failure problem. We don't know what is up with the AMD failures but at this point they don't appear to be even close to what owners of those NVidia powered machine experienced.

It will be interesting to see what the root cause is with this stuff. it could be an assembly problem, an AMD design problem or a problem with TSMC processes.

Yeah, I'm one of the users screwed by that nvidia chip package problem. My MacBook Pro 3,1 is now running with no video at all, through screen sharing. This sucks a lot.

Why does there keep being GPU problems? Are these components just poorly engineered due to the quick turnover of the product on the market?
post #68 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by pwrusr View Post

It's one thing to try and point the finger at AMD or Nvidia, but I really think in this case, Apple has maybe put form a little bit ahead of function and these processors are just too "hot" for the unibody design. They've obviously had a hard time balancing the "specs" and putting top-of the line processors in their computers to satisfy the "specs" type consumers while also trying to make the computers as thin as possible. Maybe a less powerful/cooler running GPU would've been a better idea than throttling a hotter one?

The 2012 NVidia GPUs do a better job and don't seem to overheat at all so from now on, the unibody enclosure shouldn't be a problem. I think they will have at least one model with Iris Pro this time. When you see the real-time performance, it's very close to the 650M/750M:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/7399/215inch-imac-late-2013-review-iris-pro-driving-an-accurate-display/3

The gap widens to as much as 50% difference at higher quality there but NVidia has proprietary anti-aliasing that runs very quickly. Turning off anti-aliasing should help even it out a bit - they have to use the in-game presets for consistent comparisons. OpenCL performance is the same or higher. I could see them going Iris Pro in the whole MBP line and it would be a good move. Any performance hit would be negligible, it would run cooler, last longer on battery life and Intel's CPUs pretty much never fail.

IMO a 14" Retina Iris Pro MBP with a quad-core i7 for $1599 and a 16GB RAM option for $200 (it's soldered) would be a great laptop.
post #69 of 126

I just want to add that i always have been treated well by Apple when having an issue with an iPhone or mac  or even a cinema screen for that matter. The reason why I continue to use macs is among others that the hardware delivers. In the 9 years I have been using mainly mac I only have had issues with one 2007 MBP (one ram slot ceased to work) and now this. And I have had plenty of MBP and Mac Pros in the studio.

 

I am looking forward to hear what their verdict is but I am pretty sure it is the gfx card. And hopefully the repair will not be too expensive.

Does anybody know if flat-rate repair programs covers the 17" MBP?

 

What bothers me most is not getting the applecare since the mbp has 2,5 years. Especially after reading about continuos issues with 15"/17" unibody motherboards.

The late 2011 MBP 15" that I have runs a lot cooler than the early 17"MBP. So hopefully it will not die on me in 6 months.

 

However the fried motherboard/gfx card issues seems to not be mbp only. I have two friends both with a 2012 mba 13" that had to get their motherboards replaced after a certain black screen and dead on reboot happening (Apple did the change at no cost - one even was more than 1 year old but was covered due to the 2 years EU warranty ).

Clearly it is not fair to conclude from such a small test audience. But it worries me if it is the choice of cheaper components that shortens the lifetime (think Samsung, using very cheap capacitors shortening the lifespan of your tv but keeps the price to a minimum).

 

Did anybody notice if the graphics on the 17" MBP looked interlaced? Mine had this interlace issue - every second line was a bit dimmer. ( just like the powerbook g4 1,67ghz some 7 years back...with ati gfx)  Not in clear colors  but in mixed colors it showed up all the time.

post #70 of 126
I've had the discrete GPU problem happen to me THREE TIMES already. And last time I got my computer back from depot, they swapped the screen assembly and put an incorrect one (lower res) on. All in all my computer has been in Apple's possession (and therefore, away from me) for a running total of about 6 weeks now. Completely unacceptable for a machine of this $.
post #71 of 126

I wish this topic would get more traction :|

post #72 of 126

Nothing new.  It's only "sporadic" failures.  Tell me any other laptop won't have this sporadic failures?

2.5 yo laptop needs to be replaced anyway.  $600 logic board replacement is reasonable for an over $1200 laptop.

post #73 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ingo Hoffmann View Post
 

I had this issue 2 months ago. It started with some graphical glitches and it worsen by the week. In the end it would freeze minutes after a reboot.

Took to an Apple Store, PRAM reset got me an extra week until all the problems returned. Had to fork over £400 to get the motherboard replaced :(

 

Should have sold it on ebay after the PRAM reset.

post #74 of 126
Hmmmmmm, now where have I heard of THIS happening before? I seem to remember a class action lawsuit against Apple for this very issue.

Oh no.....wait, I'm wrong. There were TWO class-action lawsuits, two years in a row. My mistake.
post #75 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryn Lowe View Post
 

Speaking as an IT technician that has to fix those $400 notebooks you're full of crap.

 

Failure rate of MacBook Pros are CONSIDERABLY less than the failure rate of a $400 laptop.

 

There's still the elephant in the room though. That $400 notebook is still running a crap OS... even with Linux on it (Yes I damn well went there).

 

How do you know, when you fix PC notebooks?  Most people bring their Macs into Apple stores, or send them back to the company to get fixed.  Why is every pro-Mac source actually recommending that people buy the extra $250+ warranty plan in case their Retina Macbooks bite the big one?  As for failure rates....that only makes sense given that Apple holds a 6.7% share of the computer market, as opposed to 92.27% on the PC front.  If your competitor sells 1,000,000 units in a year, and you sell 10,000, guess who is going to have a higher list of reported failures?
 

Simple math, Mr. I.T. Technician.

post #76 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by ipen View Post
 

Nothing new.  It's only "sporadic" failures.  Tell me any other laptop won't have this sporadic failures?

2.5 yo laptop needs to be replaced anyway.  $600 logic board replacement is reasonable for an over $1200 laptop.

 

Tell it to my wife who is still happily soldiering on with her rock-solid MSI G laptop that she bought in fall of 2008.  Not a single hiccup, crash, lockup, or hardware issue.  

post #77 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by bz101 View Post
 

I had the same issue about 2 months ago.  Only remedy was to replace the logic board for $550 ($350 if you send it out for repair through an Apple Store -- which I couldn't because it takes 3-4 days and this is a work machine).

 

I brought in examples from message boards at the time to show this was a bigger issue, but the store said there is no formal warranty program in place for early-2011 15" Macbook Pros so I would have to pay.

 

Now I see this.

 

I get you never know the failure rate from message boards (where only the problem cases speak out), but clearly this is a bigger issue than normal wear and tear.

 

I had a problem with the battery and it was later found to be a firmware issue so they did refund my $180 battery replacement fee after the fact.  So Apple does make good on their mistakes.  Nobody (no company) is perfect and there is not an unlimited warranty on anything.  

 

But if this is a broader problem then Apple needs to make good for their loyal customers.

 

 

You obviously werent' around during the 2008/2009 twin-year class action lawsuits against Apple for these very same GPU issues.  Macbooks and iMacs were arriving by the truckloads to users who reported yellow-tinted or corrupted screens, or D.O.A. GPUs.  They refused to fix these problems, prompting the class action lawsuit.  Precisely one year later during the 2009 Christmas season, it happened AGAIN.  Apple making good on their mistakes?  Hardly.  When something goes wrong, I expect my company to honor their warranties, not say "you were holding it wrong."

post #78 of 126
Quote:
Originally Posted by ipen View Post
 

Nothing new.  It's only "sporadic" failures.  Tell me any other laptop won't have this sporadic failures?

2.5 yo laptop needs to be replaced anyway.  $600 logic board replacement is reasonable for an over $1200 laptop.

 

I'm not sure that most of the affected users would consider their experiences "sporadic" - a machine that only boots to a pinstriped screen, or crashes whenever you run anything graphics-intensive can render a computer completely useless.  I'm not sure the title of this thread really captures the experiences documented by thousands of posts over the last 3 years.  Perhaps it's "sporadic" in that users are suddenly affected after months or years of ownership? 

 

And while this is just getting more visibility now, there were plenty of affected users in 2011 and 2012 as well.  I don't think it's reasonable to expect a $2000 laptop to need $600 repairs within a year or two after purchase.  Personally, I also don't think a 2011 MacBook Pro should need replacing already - these are still very capable machines, and the hardware in them should last a lot longer than 2 years.  Mechanical parts such as hard drives or fans may have a limited average lifespan, but a GPU/logic board that fails after a couple of years is not the quality of hardware that I'd expect to find in a $2000+ Apple laptop.  Those parts should not rapidly degrade within the first few years of use, especially not in thousands of units.

post #79 of 126

Any chance we will see an extended repair program like the C2D Macbook Pro's from a few years ago?

 

Pretty disappointing to have 2 $3000 laptops in a row that need logic board replacements from faulty components.

post #80 of 126
All right, I will admit when I'm wrong. No one quoted the second post I made however. I had said that I believed nVidia hadn't had issues since 2008 but I was wrong there too as it was pointed out to me that the GeForce 330M had issues as well.

*shrugs* It is what it is.
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