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Strong demand of Apple's iPhone 5 series driving an "anti-fragmentation" of iOS - Page 2

post #41 of 63

But 10+ years ago ScienceBoy obviously was not around...

post #42 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by drblank View Post
 

"Schmidt made similarly hollow predictions about widespread adoption of Google TV and more recently insisted that Android is "more secure than the iPhone," a remark that was met by laughter during a Gartner Symposium earlier this month."

 

 

Meanwhile, back in Cupertino, Tim Cook's reaction to Schmidt's ridiculous statement....

 

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 85

 

Awesome!! :lol:

post #43 of 63
deleted

Edited by Realistic - 10/16/13 at 10:22am
Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
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Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
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post #44 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MagMan1979 View Post

Your entire argument lost all credibility once you typed "and their hardware is undeniably more advanced". They're hardware is NOT more advanced, not by a long shot, especially after the A7 SoC unveiling. And if you think "more advanced" equals a bigger screen, you have no idea what the word "advanced" truly means.

Oh, and saying "Apple is already well on its way to defeat" kinda makes you sound like one of those dipshit, dumbass analysts from Wall Street, and trolls from BGR, who've been saying Apple is Doomed for almost 30 years. STFU!

It's concern trolling. It's about as believable as posting "I've been an Apple fan since 1966 but I can't believe how far behind the competition they are..."

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #45 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScienceBoy View Post

Apple would ignore Android at its peril. I'm not a huge fan of Android, but it has some significant advantages over software, and their hardware is undeniably more advanced. They're also cheaper, which is why they are dominating in most of the world over Apple. You also seem to be ignoring all the good things that Google has done, such as the Google Maps and Earth projects, or big data or epidemic tracking or countless other initiatives that are for the good of all humankind. 

What did Steve Jobs do, exactly? Create a better phone and refuse to give any money to charity. Way to go. Contrast him to Bill Gates in this sense. 

If you don't like Android, fine. But to underestimate your enemy is the first step toward defeat. Of course, Apple is already well on its way to defeat, so this mistake has long been made. The question is whether its too late to stop the tide. 
post #46 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by appleton View Post

Google gets its money by taking your personal information. without Steve jobs and talents from apple you would still be using a feature phone or BB. charity? please. it's called venture philanthropy. when you love apple, it loves you back. when you love google, well, you know what you would end up with. one more thing, if Google doesn't make map and search great, can it still survive? why do some people want to belittle Apple Is beyond me.
post #47 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjwal View Post
 

I call BS on this report.  For the iphone 5 to have that large of share, all the previous modesl of iphones must have been turned off.  No doubt the iphone 5 is successful but I suspect there is a flaw in Chitika's analysis as it doesn't pass a simple sanity check.

 

Stats show new iPhones are making up +90% of sales; the iPhone 4S is around 7%. So most new iPhones are 5-class.

On Android, best estimates show 60% are low end iPhone 4-class or lower devices, and only ~40% are iPhone 4S/5 class.

 

That’s making a vast difference in how "new" the installed base of iOS vs Android is. And if you look at pricing, it’s very clear what Android vendors are selling. If Apple were having a tough time selling its 5-class phones, it would actually be "slashing" prices for them. But it is not. The biggest discounts that phony propagandists are parading out are at most $50 discounts on a $550 phone. Those same hacks don’t seem to realize that the Galaxy S4 "is two for the price of none, please take one here’s a free Galaxy Tab on top." That’s a demand problem. 

post #48 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post
 

 

the Galaxy S4 "is two for the price of none, please take one here’s a free Galaxy Tab on top."

 

I'm not a Samsung fan, but I'd love to know where I can get two Galaxy S4's and a Galaxy Tab for free.  Please link us to this offer when you have the time.

post #49 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeloftroy View Post

From a developer point of view... Why wouldn't you just develop for the users of Android that have 4.x? Won't that prompt users to want to upgrade to take advantage of the better features?

It's not a question of want.  It's a question of how many people can afford to upgrade to a phone that has up-to-date features along with an up-to-date OS.  (Many may be currently locked in a contract signed when they previously got their cheap Android phone.)  

 

Meanwhile, developers already make less $$$ per Android user than per iPhone user.  The last thing they need to do is diminish the number of users to market to.

 

This is a significant problem for Android.

post #50 of 63
IOS is resolution independent the use of pixel based graphics is another issue. Pixel based graphics though make perfect sense in some cases. Sometimes a picture is a far better solution than a vector based solution.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimmyDax View Post

Not at all undignified, comparatively. Unless we hold AI to a higher standard than most print media? The absolute bollocks they print about Apple is ridiculous; this is mainly true, at least.
Oh come on, every single letter AI prints represents the truth. The fact that Appleinsider is a rump more sight doesn't mean any evaluation of what is printed is required on your part.
Quote:
Updates to apps for full screen aka iPhone 5+ use are still lackluster, not sure we're going to be seeing a plethora of screen sizes any time soon. The games especially that have just put colorful frames instead of black borders are just awful. At least on android they have to support stretching around for different screen sizes, much like apple made it mandatory for an app to be able to gracefully quit at a moment's notice without losing data.
Apple has a set of routines in iOS for stretching, scaling or whatever you want to call it. If the developers don't use those routines or don't supply 5 series specific graphics it isn't Apples fault.
Quote:
I can see this, along with Apple's continuous use of pixel-level graphics (not resolution independent) limiting their choices going forward.
This is baloney, Apple uses pixel based graphics where it makes sense. It is never a problem with Apps where the developer gives a damn about his users. Given that a developer can write an app that never uses pixel based graphical objects and thus is resolution independent.

You really don't have a grasp on the technology that Apple has developed in iOS.
Quote:
Of course, with obsolescence comes defragmentation, so Apple are probably in a better position to keep moving forward more than competitors in that regard, at least; iPhone users upgrade.

I really have a hard time grasping what you are whining about. Apparently you have a total misunderstanding of what Apple is responsible for and what developers are responsible for.
post #51 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post
 

No.

Obviously.

Because it isn't software?

This isn't the first place where your so-called argument falls apart but is breathtaking, although it would be breathtaking if you had a clue.

Apple didn't hire Angela Ahrendts, whose current up-market company has particular expertise in China, to help them build a cheaper phone.

 
You have not the slightest clue what Steve Jobs gave to charity. True charity is not seen. Bill Gates is doing a great work though not on his own but driven by his wife Melinda and he's using ill gotten gains to do it.
 

Like you'd have a clue about Apple's thinking!

 

By every metric this is untrue. Do you know how much of the phone market Steve Jobs hoped to corner with the iPhone when released? Your arguments are laughable except for the waste of time taken to reply to them.

And yet you took the time to reply. I think he is the one laughing at you.

post #52 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post
 

It's not a question of want.  It's a question of how many people can afford to upgrade to a phone that has up-to-date features along with an up-to-date OS.  (Many may be currently locked in a contract signed when they previously got their cheap Android phone.)  

 

Meanwhile, developers already make less $$$ per Android user than per iPhone user.  The last thing they need to do is diminish the number of users to market to.

 

 

This is an interesting point. Many argue how developers make less $$$ per Android user. But is that really important? The number of users only affects development effort if the load on server increases proportionally. But this is not the case.

 

Let's argue, for the sake of argument, there are 1B Android users, and 300M iOS users. Then a developer is making more total money off Android than iOS if revenue per Android user is as low as 1/3 of revenue per iOS user. There is an extra cost to development for Android due to fragmentation. But, from personal experience, the incremental effort is not onerous if one picks 10 target Android phones for testing. Also from personal experience, one would test on multiple iOS devices anyhow.

 

All to say, for a developer, the Android v. iOS argument is not as simple as installed base or per user revenue. 

post #53 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post
 

 

I think your figures are off by quite a large margin.  Would you care to offer a source or two for your numbers?

 

Just Bing "android fragmentation" and you'll find plenty of results.

Here's a quote from July 2013: "... the most-used API now is a later version of Gingerbread which only has around 35% share."

 

Full story: "Android Fragmentation Worse Than Ever": 

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/jul/30/android-fragmentation-visualised-opensignal

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post #54 of 63
I
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

"Down on Fraggle Roid."

Brilliant. How many here have heard of Fraggle Rock, I wonder?

I grew up watching Fraggle Rock!
post #55 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

Stats show new iPhones are making up +90% of sales; the iPhone 4S is around 7%. So most new iPhones are 5-class.
On Android, best estimates show 60% are low end iPhone 4-class or lower devices, and only ~40% are iPhone 4S/5 class.

That’s making a vast difference in how "new" the installed base of iOS vs Android is. And if you look at pricing, it’s very clear what Android vendors are selling. If Apple were having a tough time selling its 5-class phones, it would actually be "slashing" prices for them. But it is not. The biggest discounts that phony propagandists are parading out are at most $50 discounts on a $550 phone. Those same hacks don’t seem to realize that the Galaxy S4 "is two for the price of none, please take one here’s a free Galaxy Tab on top." That’s a demand problem. 
The post you're responding to was solely about the distribution of iPhone models in the iPhone base. Nothing to do with Android at all.

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post #56 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post
 

And yet you took the time to reply. I think he is the one laughing at you.

From his first post, he posted apologist drivel. He then confirmed his ignorance in later posts. Yes, I didn't want to take time responding and yet did. What's your excuse? He can laugh all he wants, no harm.

Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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post #57 of 63
For Gawd's sake, who wrote this and who did they think they were writing it for? It's patronising to ignore the iPhone 5 suffixes of c or s and instead just call them iPhone 5 (which was last years phone). In fact, the author said:

"The majority of new iPhones sold last year were iPhone 5. That trend is continuing even faster now that Apple sells two iPhone 5 models, representing an increasing percentage of the iPhone installed base with a high-end model."

That's just incorrect. Grammatically as well as factually. Get a grip!!!
post #58 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

Just Bing "android fragmentation" and you'll find plenty of results.
Here's a quote from July 2013: "... the most-used API now is a later version of Gingerbread which only has around 35% share."

Full story: "Android Fragmentation Worse Than Ever": 
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/jul/30/android-fragmentation-visualised-opensignal
You'll certainly find plenty of results but none of which support the poster's statement that less than a third of Android users are on 4.0 or higher.
post #59 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post
 

Good news for Apple, but I believe the development problems with Android fragmentation are overstated; Google Play Services means that developers largely don't need to be concerned with the version of Android on the device.  Security updates (or the lack of them) for older versions of Android is definitely still an issue, but app development not so much.

 

Would be a perfectly fine article without the undignified Android sniping.

 

So, when will Infinity Blade be coming to this Android powerhouse, released in June?

 

How many million "activations" will it count for?

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post #60 of 63
Assumption time!

People who get a phone on contract for free, and then choose the cheapest data contract, who are attracted to the huge number of free attractions on Googplay, may just be interested in not paying for something. Anything. Ever.

People who choose to pay $300 for a phone with a good data allowance contract and seem to use their devices for searching the net and playing gorgeously designed and engineered games may just indicate a different type of person.

Every business in existence must continually increase its profits, being a capitalist society (not assumption, a fact, in fact).

A free operating system being installed on a free phone supported by a minimal data package full of free apps with no regulation or structure may just indicate a flaw in business savvy.

Some other facts:
Apple has repeatedly done things from the ground up to ensure profitability. Once it became profitable to release iOS updates for free, they became free. Android has repeatedly been baffled by the concept of updates, despite the original OS ostensibly being free. The proof is in the pudding, and despite Schmidie's best blustering, has befooled himself.

It's quite sad that more pudding-relevant evidence, such as copycats lacking creativity, are emerging: Xiaomi even uses Apple's Keynote presentation fonts, sounds and effects. I hope such people alter their hiring practices. And develop some dignity.
post #61 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post
 

 

So, when will Infinity Blade be coming to this Android powerhouse, released in June?

 

How many million "activations" will it count for?

No one claimed there isn't hardware fragmentation.  There's hardware fragmentation on iOS as well over six years of iterations, but it's reasonable to assume that people without a high spec handset aren't your market for Infinity Blade.

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post #62 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post
 

No one claimed there isn't hardware fragmentation.  There's hardware fragmentation on iOS as well over six years of iterations, but it's reasonable to assume that people without a high spec handset aren't your market for Infinity Blade.

 

 

...or anything else really, hence the failure of the "marketshare is all that matters" argument.

 

 "Google Play Services means that developers largely don't need to be concerned with the version of Android on the device."

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post #63 of 63

Not sure why you've quoted me there; I still stand by that being correct (to my knowledge, I'm not an Android user or developer) in terms of the software.  Hardware is a different ballgame if you're talking about resource-intensive apps, but an awful lot of apps (most?) aren't that resource-intensive.

 

And whether Android is a worthwhile market to develop for in terms of return is a different question that has little to do with fragmentation.

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