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iPad 2 remains Apple's most popular tablet, iPhone 5c demand growing

post #1 of 77
Thread Starter 
Apple's mid-range iPhone 5c is beginning to close the sales gap on the company's flagship iPhone 5s, while the iPad 2 commands the lion's share of the Apple tablet installed base, according to new data from mobile analytics company Localytics.

Localytics iPhone data


The report, which examined 20 million unique devices between Sept. 20 and Oct. 18, says that there are now 2.3 active iPhone 5s units for every iPhone 5c globally, down from 3.3 units one week after the handsets' launch. The numbers are even tighter in the United States, with the iPhone 5s-to-5c ratio dropping from 3.0 one week after launch to 1.9 today.

The iPhone 5c's apparently increasing popularity flies in the face of reports of lackluster sales and slashed production orders for the colorful device. Continually constrained iPhone 5s supplies may be contributing --?Apple retail associates said in September that "the 5C is quite good and a lot of customers who can't get the 5s haven't minded upgrading to a 5c."

Localytics iPad data


Meanwhile, Apple's iPad 2 continues to be the most popular iPad, accounting for nearly 40 percent of active units. The iPad 2's 38 percent share is more than that of the latest iPad 4 (18 percent) and iPad mini (17 percent) combined, according to the data.

The iPad 2 featured an all-new industrial design, and subsequent revisions to Apple's tablet have added higher-resolution Retina displays and incremental hardware upgrades. Localytics suggests this may be a factor in the iPad 2's continued dominance, saying it is possible that "perceived differentiation of the latest-generation tablets is getting smaller with each new release."

Apple is widely expected to unveil a redesigned, slimmer fifth-generation iPad on Tuesday in what one analyst called "the most important refresh of the iPad franchise...since the first iPad went on sale." Cupertino is also --?controversially --?rumored to show off a Retina display-equipped second-generation iPad mini at the event.
post #2 of 77
Localytics statistics apparently had no value before so I'm thinking they must hold no value now.
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post #3 of 77
Still have the iPad 2 myself... I bet that most people waited until the 2 to buy and then didn't see any real benefit to the 3 or the 4...
post #4 of 77

Why anyone is surprised with this is beyond me.

The vast majority who RUSHED to purchase at launch were Apple fans...who buy the best, which is the 5s.

Both phones are good phones.

Many would like to save a couple hundred dollars and consider... then buy the 5c.

It was just a matter of time.

 

Now, need to look at total numbers to determine whether it was a success or not.  I'm guessing it was a success and will continue to be for the year at least.

post #5 of 77
I have an iPad 2, and I am waiting for a Retina iPad Mini. I think most people waited for the 2nd gen iPad. The first iPad was thick and had no front camera, and I just waited for the 2nd gen.

Also, tablets arent like your phone, there is no contract, and you don't necessarily have to upgrade as often as you would your phone. My iPad 2 works great, and I don't think I would ever update to another iPad unless something happened to it.
post #6 of 77
Wow! I think of the iPad 2 as being so old and slow that it surprises me that anyone would choose it. I do know that it is the iPad of choice by companies that are giving away a tablet for promotional reasons. Still...

That the iPhone 5c is gaining on the 5s isn't surprising, there are a lot of buyers that need to wait until their old iPhone comes off contract (myself included) and they may be younger and less affluent than the 5s buyers. Two demographics that may lean toward the more colorful iPhones.
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post #7 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

Still have the iPad 2 myself... I bet that most people waited until the 2 to buy and then didn't see any real benefit to the 3 or the 4...

If you are using an iPad in fairly casual situations... the mini is too small and the retina is overkill.

 

I'm using an iPad 2 as my 'non-work' computer...  With my uncorrected vision (and red-green colorblindness, it works fine in display mode.   I'm lacking a bit of 'zip' that my wife's iPhone 5 has... so I'm seriously contemplating a new iPad (and reusing this iPad 2 as a universal remote and home automation control).

post #8 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

Still have the iPad 2 myself... I bet that most people waited until the 2 to buy and then didn't see any real benefit to the 3 or the 4...

 

Retina display. I guess the reason the iPad 2 still dominate is because it is being sold for more than 2 years now.

 

I still use my 3rd generation iPad and my son uses my iPad 2. I didn't upgrade to the 4th generation iPad though because the specs bump was not that important to me.


Edited by NasserAE - 10/21/13 at 11:19am
post #9 of 77
I had the iPad 1 and 3. The retina is cool and stuff, especially for reading, but it's a battery drain! one of my favorite features of iPad 1 is its amazing battery life and it was gone on the iPad 3. Simple things like reading on iPad 3 kill the battery.
post #10 of 77
When did the iPad become a franchise, AI ?

Inquiring minds would like to know. 1biggrin.gif
post #11 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

Still have the iPad 2 myself... I bet that most people waited until the 2 to buy and then didn't see any real benefit to the 3 or the 4...

Also education sales of the iPad 2 really took off and sustained even after the 3 was released, perhaps due to the price and also to keep all students on the same platform. That said, I doubt that Localytics would be tracking data from the education market as those devices are probably fairly well locked down.

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post #12 of 77

Wow, even if you take their statistics at face value, their analysis is incredibly stupid. Issues they did not take into account:

 

The iPad 2 was made available through the Apple Store 2.5 years ago AND they still sell it.

 

The 3rd gen iPad was available for about 7 months and then DISCONTINUED. After October 12, 2012 you could not buy a iPad 3.

 

The 4th gen iPad has been only available for a year. 

 

 

The obvious conclusion: iPad 2 has the biggest slice of the install base because it's been sold for BY FAR the most amount of time. 

 

Also, no mention of retailers lowering the price of the 5C????? Ya think that might cause the 5S vs 5C ratio to drop?

 

In summary, this Localytics company is a joke.

post #13 of 77
If Apple retains the current iPad mini and sells it for $229 to $259 then it will soon be the dominant device.

iPad 5 $499
iPad 4 $399
iPad mini 2 $329
iPad mini $249

And the holidays will be sweet for Apple.
post #14 of 77
Interesting. It was the iPad 3 being Retina that I thought really made it an easy upgrade from the iPad 2. It's getting the iPad 4 after having the iPad 3 that was no interest to me.
post #15 of 77
I have the ipad 2 and ipad 3. I love the retina display but I the lighter weight of the 2 is really nice also. My kids love both of them. I purchased both of them from apple refurbished but I can see people saving $100 and just getting the 2. I purchased the 5s as an upgrade from the 4s. I wanted the newest tech with the touch id and improved camera. I can see why the C is appealing, the phone feels very nice to hold and the colors do appeal to me especially ladies. I like the 5s better since it is lighter and just a more classy phone to me but when you can get a iphone for $50 that has lte, long battery life and a 4 in screen I see why folks have started to see it in a new light.
post #16 of 77
I thought the iPad 2 was a major upgrade over the iPad 1 and bought it immediately. I was also issued an iPad 3 by my job since we do tablet publishing. I find I prefer my iPad 2 despite the Retina of the iPad 3 because my iPad 2 is thinner, lighter, and has better batter life. The color temperature of the iPad 3 also seems off (yellow-tint). The iPad 2 is marginally slower than the iPad 3, but in practice I don't notice any difference. And while I can see the difference in resolution between the two devices, I don't find it all that important. The iPad 2 resolution seems fine and in fact most people I know can't tell the difference at all. (They all assume my iPad 2 screen is retina.)

That said, am looking forward to buying the new iPad 5.
post #17 of 77

I think Apple created a problem when it made the 3rd gen iPad fatter and heavier. Weight is really the most important factor with the iPad. In my experience, regular people don't understand the benefits of a retina display. It's something I find really odd, since I've always preferred higher DPI displays, but for some reason it's really hard for people to get a handle on. So you have the iPad 2, which has a better form factor, and is $100 cheaper and the only benefits of the 3rd/4th gen models are the display and CPU/GPU, which people have a hard time getting excited about. Hopefully this will change with the 5th gen model.

post #18 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by drewys808 View Post
 

Why anyone is surprised with this is beyond me.

The vast majority who RUSHED to purchase at launch were Apple fans...who buy the best, which is the 5s.

Both phones are good phones.

Many would like to save a couple hundred dollars and consider... then buy the 5c.

It was just a matter of time.

 

Now, need to look at total numbers to determine whether it was a success or not.  I'm guessing it was a success and will continue to be for the year at least.

 

I think the bigger issue is Apple's inability to ship the 5s. I have one ordered from AT&T but it won't show as *sold* until it ships as AT&T won't bill me until such time. 

 

I wonder how many outstanding orders are out there for the 5s? 

post #19 of 77

I think Apple should keep both iPads options of Retina and non-Retina. $100 bucks won't be the determining factor for most of us*, but those not needing retina, could save big! 

 

*before I get flamed. By most of us, I mean those of us here in the love of technology where an extra $100 to have the top specs probably won't be the factor. However, saving that $100 on electronics for kids will add up. 

post #20 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

I think Apple should keep both iPads options of Retina and non-Retina. $100 bucks won't be the determining factor for most of us, but those not needing retina, could save big! 

How would the pricey stepping occur? The iPad 2 is currently at $399. If they lower it by $100 it's then $299, or $30 less than the iPad mini. That might work if the iPad Mini can go Retina this year at the same price, but if not then I'd think it would make more sense to drop the iPad 2 altogether and make the slightly heavier and thicker iPad 4 the $399 model over the thinner, lighter and faster iPad 5.
post #21 of 77
I'm sure the fact that you have to wait weeks before getting the 5s and being able to get the 5c quickly plays a part. Some people would rather not wait.
post #22 of 77
I have a bunch of tablets because I'm a developer. The iPad 2 remains my personal machine, I found that while the retina display on the 3 was beautiful I didn't want the additional thickness or poorer battery life, the iPad 2 hit a sweet spot for me.

I lusted after the iPad mini so bought one for my partner and I've spent a bit of time evaluating it. For me the mini is cute but just a bit too fiddly for a lot of uses, but its just right for her.

I still prefer the iPad 2, but in truth its this next iPad that I've been waiting for. If the new design is a little lighter and smaller and with equivalent battery life, I'll jump at it. The camera is weak on the iPad 2 so I'm hoping that will be a lot better too.
post #23 of 77
I have the iPad 2. All full-sized tablets released after the iPad 2 are noticeably heavier so I haven't bothered to upgrade. It looks like the next full-sized iPad will finally go lighter instead of heavier than the iPad 2. I have been buying refurbished iPad 2's for family members. It's the best deal.

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post #24 of 77
I'm also an iPad2 owner, and was/am happy with it, not seeing the need to upgrade.

However, if the update includes a 64-bit A7X, I might be mightily tempted...
post #25 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by daphreev View Post

I have an iPad 2, and I am waiting for a Retina iPad Mini. I think most people waited for the 2nd gen iPad. The first iPad was thick and had no front camera, and I just waited for the 2nd gen.

Also, tablets arent like your phone, there is no contract, and you don't necessarily have to upgrade as often as you would your phone. My iPad 2 works great, and I don't think I would ever update to another iPad unless something happened to it.

Ditto (thanks for saving me some typing!)

post #26 of 77

Tablets differ from the smartphone market in that they are a) less likely to be subsidized and b) are bought in large volumes by education/enterprise/government for mass deployment. 

 

Those factors explain why Android, particularly Samsung, has such a poor showing in tablets, and why tablet pricing has a lower concentration. Fleet buyers are less likely to go with a fancier, higher end tablet unless it offers some unique functionality. 

 

Retina Display is great for medical applications, flight bags and other uses where detail is important. But for many institutional buyers, the basic 2 makes more sense, because they can afford to buy more. 

 

That explains why Apple is developing technologies like Touch ID and the 64-bit A7, because the things that have sold iPhones (nice camera, nice display) aren’t necessarily going to push higher end iPad sales. Convenient security and the ability to run a new class of apps is more likely to upgrade large buyers.  

post #27 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by akqies View Post


How would the pricey stepping occur? The iPad 2 is currently at $399. If they lower it by $100 it's then $299, or $30 less than the iPad mini. That might work if the iPad Mini can go Retina this year at the same price, but if not then I'd think it would make more sense to drop the iPad 2 altogether and make the slightly heavier and thicker iPad 4 the $399 model over the thinner, lighter and faster iPad 5.

 

iPad 2 does not have retina, so why would it be reduce from what it is now? 

post #28 of 77

This is consistent with my long-standing hypothesis that super high resolution (retina) displays are not highly valued by most consumers. I think it's similar to how most consumers (as in 95%) are perfectly happy with 256 kbps AAC files and would never, ever pay extra for lossless. 

 

Also consistent with that hypothesis is the lackluster sales performance of the retina MBP. 

 

I think Apple would be smart to offer retina and non-retina versions of all products, using the "retina" as a way to gouge people who think they need it while making the non-retina versions totally equivalent in all other ways, but at a much more reasonable price. 

post #29 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post

iPad 2 does not have retina, so why would it be reduce from what it is now? 

I'm not sure what a price reduction has to do with it being Retina or non-Retina. It's a year older now. Why should the iPad 2 stay at $399 indefinitely when Apple's modus operandi for iOS-based devices is to drop it by $100 YoY?
post #30 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by akqies View Post

Interesting. It was the iPad 3 being Retina that I thought really made it an easy upgrade from the iPad 2. It's getting the iPad 4 after having the iPad 3 that was no interest to me.

That's how I judged it as well.

 

The retina mini, portability with a bit nicer screen and perhaps a speedier cpu will be of interest. Keeping the 3 for inhome use unless they REALLY blow the doors off with the iPad 5.

post #31 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by daphreev View Post

I have an iPad 2, and I am waiting for a Retina iPad Mini. I think most people waited for the 2nd gen iPad. The first iPad was thick and had no front camera, and I just waited for the 2nd gen.
...
My iPad 2 works great, and I don't think I would ever update to another iPad unless something happened to it.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Wow! I think of the iPad 2 as being so old and slow that it surprises me that anyone would choose it. I do know that it is the iPad of choice by companies that are giving away a tablet for promotional reasons. Still...
 

 

I still have my iPad2 and iPad3. My iPad2 is not noticeably slow running iOS6. But my iPad3 looks visibly better with RD. 

post #32 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post
 

This is consistent with my long-standing hypothesis that super high resolution (retina) displays are not highly valued by most consumers. I think it's similar to how most consumers (as in 95%) are perfectly happy with 256 kbps AAC files and would never, ever pay extra for lossless. 

 

 

I agree somewhat with the first point, but ... the difference between non-RD and RD is much more significant than your audio analogy.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post
 

Also consistent with that hypothesis is the lackluster sales performance of the retina MBP. 

 

Is that a proven fact?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post
 

I think Apple would be smart to offer retina and non-retina versions of all products, using the "retina" as a way to gouge people who think they need it while making the non-retina versions totally equivalent in all other ways, but at a much more reasonable price. 

I think they have been doing that all along?

post #33 of 77
Quote:

From the article:

Continually constrained iPhone 5s supplies may be contributing --?Apple retail associates said in September that "the 5C is quite good and a lot of customers who can't get the 5s haven't minded upgrading to a 5c."

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 

 

I think the bigger issue is Apple's inability to ship the 5s. I have one ordered from AT&T but it won't show as *sold* until it ships as AT&T won't bill me until such time. 

 

I wonder how many outstanding orders are out there for the 5s? 


This was my take from the first report of "overproduction" of the 5c:  Apple knew it was "supply constrained" on the 5s and wanted to be sure it had enough units of "new iPhones" to be able to meet any reasonable demand, knowing that any degree of early overrun had at least a year to be long-ago absorbed by next October...

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post #34 of 77
I think a few people here have nailed it. The iPad 2 is dominant because it's been on the market longer.

Add to that most people wouldn't have looked to upgrade their iPad 2 to the iPad 3, since we're used to a 2 year cycle on phones. (I was tempted for the LTE, but then it turned out the LTE didn't work outside the US - another possible reason for lower uptake.) Then, the iPad 4 wrong footed everyone. Many people probably still saw themselves keeping their iPad 2 for the full 2 years, and it wasn't clear if the 4 would make it a full 12 months.

Plus, another big feature is that Apple still support the iPad 2. It works with iOS 7 (I think rather well, despite a few issues). This is probably because they still sell it, and I don't think Apple would want to ship an OS that didn't run on their entire line of products.

So I fully expect the iPad 2 will be dropped after tomorrow, and will not be supported for iOS 8 when that becomes available. Instead, they will move the iPad 4 and iPad mini (possibly including the original mini, which is an iPad 2 really) into the low end.
post #35 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by StruckPaper View Post
 

 

I think they have been doing that all along?

 

Not really -- in fact, not at all. There is no non-reitna version of the iPhone 5s, in fact there is no non-retina iPhone on sale now at all. 

 

Regarding iPads, there is no non-retina equivalent of the iPad 4. The iPad 2 is inferior to the iPad 4 along several dimensions. 

 

Regarding MBPs, the retina MBP has a better form factor and weight than the legacy MBP. 

 

To do what I suggest, Apple would offer a non-retina version of current iPhones, iPads, and MacBooks that are equivalent in all other ways (though they could have a less beefy GPU, given the smaller number of pixels). For example, there would be a new full-sized retina iPad with an A7X and a new full-sized non-retina iPad with an A7 (but otherwise equivalent to the retina iPad). And the retina feature would cost an extra, say, $100. 

post #36 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post
 

Tablets differ from the smartphone market in that they are a) less likely to be subsidized and b) are bought in large volumes by education/enterprise/government for mass deployment. 

 

Those factors explain why Android, particularly Samsung, has such a poor showing in tablets, and why tablet pricing has a lower concentration. Fleet buyers are less likely to go with a fancier, higher end tablet unless it offers some unique functionality. 

 

Retina Display is great for medical applications, flight bags and other uses where detail is important. But for many institutional buyers, the basic 2 makes more sense, because they can afford to buy more. 

 

That explains why Apple is developing technologies like Touch ID and the 64-bit A7, because the things that have sold iPhones (nice camera, nice display) aren’t necessarily going to push higher end iPad sales. Convenient security and the ability to run a new class of apps is more likely to upgrade large buyers.  

On that basis, what feature(s) would attract a company to purchase a new iPad 5 versus a Bay Trail device with Windows 8.1?

Examples

 

Sharp Mebius Pad:  10.1 inch 2560x1600 IGZO display, Z3770 Bay Trail, Windows 8.1 + free MS Office 2013, IP5X/IPX5/IPX7 certified (dust/water proof), active digitizer, optional LTE via Intel's new chipset, etc.  The tablet will apparently sell start between $500 and $600.

 

-or the more basic (and less expensive)-

ASUS T100: 10.1 inch 1366x768 IPS display, Z3740 Bay Trail, Windows 8.1 + free MS Office 2013, included keyboard dock with USB 3.0, microSD, etc. The device costs $349 for the 32GB and $399 for the 64GB.


Edited by LAKings33 - 10/21/13 at 1:35pm
post #37 of 77

Apple stopped selling iPad3 after launching iPad4, but kept selling iPad2. Effectively, it took iPad(3+4) ~ 18 months to equal 30 months of iPad2 sales. During 12 of those 18 months, consumers also had the additional choice of iPad Mini. So, all in all, iPad(3+4) sales has been pretty good.

post #38 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 

 

I think the bigger issue is Apple's inability to ship the 5s. I have one ordered from AT&T but it won't show as *sold* until it ships as AT&T won't bill me until such time. 

 

I wonder how many outstanding orders are out there for the 5s? 

 

 

I know several people who were interested in the 5s but went with the 5c due to their inability to walk out of their network's store with one when they needed a phone.

 

I also am amused by all this bad stuff written about the 5c sales.  Here in NYC and Brooklyn I see a lot of them in the wild.  

post #39 of 77
Just last week the iP5C was a flop. What changed?!? Oh yeah, most analyst love to dis Apple by always releasing doom and gloom reports even though there is little to substantiate their claims...lol.
post #40 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by akqies View Post


I'm not sure what a price reduction has to do with it being Retina or non-Retina. It's a year older now. Why should the iPad 2 stay at $399 indefinitely when Apple's modus operandi for iOS-based devices is to drop it by $100 YoY?

 

 

Ok, let me start from the top. I think Apple should keep a non-retina iPad for both models. I don't care if it is last years, this years, or next years. They have done this with the MBP and rMBP, and I think the same should be for the iPad. Sorry for any confusion made on my part. 


Edited by Richard Getz - 10/21/13 at 1:54pm
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